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Full text of "Year book ... City of Charleston, So. Ca"



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ALLEN COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY 



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Gc 975.702 C3Sy 1903 

Year book city of 

Charleston, S. C. 



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YEAR BOOK 



«*«*1903**** 




CITY OF CHARLESTON, 



SO. CA. 



Allen County Public Library 
900 Webster Street 
POCi 

...2270 



Press of 

The Daggett Printing Company, 

Charleston, S, C. 

1904. 




Hon. J. Adger Smyth, 
Mayor. 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 



MAYOR AND ALDERMEN, 



Elected Dec. 12th, 1899. Inaugurated Dec. 18th, 1899. 



MAYOR, 
Hon. J. Adger Smyth. 



MAYOR PRO TEM 



1900— R. G. Rhett. 
1901— C. W. Kollook. 
1902 — Jas. R. Johnson. 
1903 — Samuel Lapham. 



ALDERMEN. 

Ward 1.— Geo. W. Williams, Jr., F. Q. O'Neill 
Ward 2.— Ii. G. Rhett, Dp. F. L. Frost. 
Ward 3.— W. B. Wilson, Thomas Roddy. 
Ward 4. — Samuel Lapham, R. M. Masters, 
Ward 5.— C. S. Gadsden, John F. Rafferty. 
Ward 6. — A. F. C. Cramer, Jas. R, Johnson. 
Ward 7.— W. E. Holmes, Patrick Galvin. 
Ward 8.— Dr. C. W. Kollock, F. S. Hanckel. 
Ward 9.— Theo. Melchers, A. J. Riley. 
Ward 10.— A. W. Petit, Theo. Poppen. 
Ward 11.— T. Allen Legare, Jas. F. Hanley. 
Ward 12.— H. W. Bischoff, J. A. Storfer. " 



( ' '// Goi'i rnnu ill. 

STANDING COMMITTEES OF CITY COUNCIL. 

Appointed December L8th, 1899. 



Ways and Means. — Chairman. Samuel Lapham; R. G. 
Rhett, George W. Williams, Jr., A. F. C. Cramer, F. Q. 
I I'Neill, J. R. Johnson, and the Mayor. 

Streets.— Chairman, C.S.Gadsden; W. E. Holmes, H. 
W. Bischoff, E. L. Frost, A. J. Riley, F. S. Hanckel, and 

the Mayor. 

Lighting the City.— Chairman, W. B. Wilson; C. S. 
Gadsden, R. M. Masters, C. W. Kollock, Theo. Poppen. 

Water Supply. — Chairman, C. W. Ivollock; F. S. Hanc- 
kel, R. M. Masters. 

Sewerage of the City. — Chairman, A. F. C. Cramer; Jas. 
F. Hanky, J. A. Storfer, J. F. Rafferty, and the Mayor. 

Railroads. — Chairman, Geo. W. Williams, Jr.; R. G. 
Rhett, Samuel Lapham. 

Electric Wires. — Chairman, J. F. Rafferty; Theo. Poppen, 
W. B. Wilson, F. S. Hanckel, and the Mayor. 

Tidal Drains.— Chairman, J. A. Storfer; J. F. Rafferty, 
Theo. Poppen. 

Accounts.— Chairman, Frank Q. O'Neill; W. E. Holmes, 
and the Mayor. 

Engrossed Bills. — Chairman, A. J. Riley; J, A. Storfer, 
Thomas Roddy. 

Journals and Vacant Offices. — Chairman, W. E. Holmes; 
A. W. Petit, P. Galvin. 

Printing. — Chairman, T. Allen Legare; Thomas Roddy, 
F. L. Frost. 







< \> 






City Government. v. 

Legislative Matters.— Chairman, F. L. Frost ; W. B. 
Wilson, A. W. Petit, R. M. Masters, and the Mayor. 

City Hall Clock and Chimes. — Chairman, R. M. Masters; 
T. Allen Legare, C. W. Kollock. 

City Lands. — Chairman, Thomas Roddy ; J. A. Storfer; 
J. F. Hanley. 

Public Buildings. — Chairman, Theo. Melchers; R. M. 
Masters, James F. Hanley. 

Contracts— Chairman, R. G. Rhett ; II. W. Bischoffand 
the Mayor. 

Wood and Brick Buildings.— Chairman, H. W. Bischofi; 
Theo. Melchers, J. F. Raflerty. 

Fire Escapes. — Chairman, P. Galvin; Theo. Melchers, J. 
F. Hanley. 

Claims. — Chairman, Theo. Poppen; T. A. Legare, Theo. 
Melchers, J. F. Rafferty, and the Mayor. 

Steam Engines- — Chairman, A. W. Petit; Thos. Roddy, 
Theo. Melchers. 

Artesian Well and Lot — Chairman, F. S. Hanckel ; P. 
Galvin, A. W. Petit. 

Port and Harbor Improvements — Chairman, J. F. Han- 
ley; T. A. Legare, P. Galvin. 

Official Bonds — Chairman, James R. Johnson; Theo. 
Poppen and the Mayor. 

CLERK OF COUNCIL. 
W. W. Simons. 

MAYOR'S SECRETARY AND CUSTODIAN OF CITY 

HALL. 

Robert G, O'Neale. 



\ i. ( '<!>/ Qua vivnient. 

CITY COURT. 

Ri corder— Theodore I >. Jervey. 
Corporation Counsel — Geo. II. Moiled. 
Sh< ritl — -( rlenn E. Davis. 
Clerk— Robert G. O'Neale. 

CITY OFFICERS. 

Treasurer — I. ( )rrin Lea. 
Assessor — D. L. Sinkler. 

Superintendent of Streets— James B. Keckley. 
City Survi'vor — I. II. Dingle. 
Vssistanl City Surveyor — I). C. Barbot. 
Sewerage Engineer — John Gadsden, Jr. 
City Electrician — Ton Simons. 
Tidal Drain Keeper — Wrn. P. McMahon. 

POLICE OFFICERS. 

W. A. Boyle, Chief of Police. 
.John P. Dunn, 1st Lieut. 
.1 . II. Steenken, 2nd Lieut. 
Edward P. Cantwell, 3rd Lieut. 

[nspector and Surveyors of Timber — J. C. Budds, P. 
Devereux, C. S. Jenkins, C. F. Steinmyer. 

Chimney Contractors — Wards 1 and 2, J. J. Kiley; Wards 
3 and 4. F. L. < Weill ; Wards 5 and 6, D. Melfi ; Wards 7 
and 8, J. B. W. Philips; Wards 9 and 10, J. J. Noland ; 
Wards II and 12, George Worrell. 

BOARD OF HEALTH. 

T. R, McGahan, Chairman; Charles M. Rees, M. D., C. 
W. Kollock, VI. I)., W. H. Huger, M. D., C. P. Aimar, A. 
Sydney Smith, Hall T. McGee, W. F. Carrington, St. John 
p". Kinloch, G. M. Pollitzer, Jas. F. Redding. 



("if// Government. vii. 

Health Officer and Secretary of Board — J. Merceir Green, 
M. B, 

Clerk — J. Faber Poreher. 

Sanitary Inspectors—District No. 1, Oilman Courtenay; 
District No. 2, A. W. Mitchell; District No. 3 ? M. Ilogan ; 
District No. 4, D. P. Johnston. 

Health Detective— F. Nipson. 

City Dispensary Physicians — Wm. Mazyck, M. D., District 
No. 1; Rowland Alston, M. D., District No. 2; A. C. Wild- 
hagen, M. D., District No. 3; H. W. DeSaussure, M. D., 
District No. 4: J. P. Galvin, M. D., District No. 5; J. La- 
Koache Wilson, M. D., District No. 6. 

FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

Board of Fire Masters — F. S. Rodgers, Chairman; Chas. 
R, Valk, A. J. Riley, R. M. Masters, Theo. Poppen, A. M. 
Lee and the Mayor. 

Chief— 0. G. Marjenhoff. 

Assistant Chief — L. Behrens. 

COLLEGE OF CHARLESTON. 

Trustees — Hon. C. H. Simonton, President; Hon. John F. 
Ficken, V. P., Hon. J. Adger Smyth, Mayor, Ex-Officio, 
Hon. G. Lamb Bnist, G. H. Sass, H. A. M, Smith, A. C. 
Kaufman, Henry P. Archer, J. E. Burke, Hon. D. S. Hen- 
derson, J. Adger Smyth, F. Q. O'Neill, C. S. Gadsden, W. 
St. Julien Jervey, J. P. K. Bryan, Theo. D. Jervey, City 
Recorder. 

Secretary and Treasurer — Arthur Mazyck. 



y\\\ i Got'i niint III . 

1 [ K ; 1 1 SCHOOL OF CHARLESTON. 

Trustees Julian Mitchell, President; G. W. Mclver, F. 
(J. O'Neill, \h\ C. \V\ Kollock, James R. Johnson, J. 1*. K. 
Bryan, Kdwin 1*. b>6st, [Ion. James Simons and the Mayor. 

Secretary — R. < '. < >'Neale. 



City Government. ix. 

DEPARTMENT OF CHARITIES, 



WILLIAM ENSTON HOME. 

Trustees — Wm. E. Huger, President; Wm. Enston But- 
ler, 1st Vice-President; Dr. C. P. Aimar, 2nd Vice-Presi- 
dent; F. E. Taylor, 3rd Vice-President; J. P. K. Bryan, 
Geo. W. Williams, C. R. Valk, E. H. Pringle, A. W. Taft, 
T. S. Wilbur, Arthur Lynab, M. B. Paine and the Mayor. 

Trustee Emeritus — Hon. Wm. A. Courtenay. 

Secretary — M. B. Paine. 

Superintendent — Mrs. M. H. Westmoreland. 

ORPHAN HOUSE. 

Commissioners — F. J. Pelzer, Chairman; Dr. J. S. Buist, 
Vice-Chairman; V. C. Dibble, A. F. C. Cramer, I. W. 
Hirsch, Rbbt. C. Lebby, Dr. B. A. Muckenfuss, A. T. 
Smythe, T. A. Wilbur, F. Q. O'Neill, S. G. Stoney, Geo. 
W. Williams. 



PRESENT OFFICERS. 

Miss A. K. Irving, Principal and Superintendent. 

Physician of the Institution — Dr, W. H. Huger. 

Secretary and Treasurer of the Board — St. John P. Kin- 
loch. 

Engineer — Ashley L. Barton. 

CITY ORPHAN ASYLUM. 

Commissioners — T. M. Mordecai, Chairman; B. H. Rut- 
ledge, Secretary and Treasurer; Geo. D. Bryan, Geo. S. 
Legare, Charles Litschgi, Andrew J. Riley, Jas. F. Redding. 

Physician — Edward Rutledge, M. D. 



\ . ( 'it// ( i '(>/"< 'I'linn ill . 

CITY I10SPTT \L. 

Commissioners — Zimmerman Davis, Chairman; Hall T. 
McGee, \ ice ( 'liaii'inan : Stephen E, Welch, Secretary ; T. 
T. Hyde, G. M. Pollitzer, F. S. Hanckel, Thos. S. Sinkler, 
-I. E. Cogswell, 11. W. Fuseler, Simon Fogarty. 

Superintendent — Chas. L. DuBos. 

ALMS HOUSE. 

Commissioners — Herman Klatte, Chairman; E. W. Per- 
cival, Yice-Chairman; A. W. J,ager, Secretary; J. C. II. 
Claussen, M. Harris. Robert P. Evans, Theo. Poppen, C. H. 
Blase, Theo. W. Passailaigue, F. S. Hanckel, J. T. Roddy, 
A. W. Petit. 

Master — I ulius Sehroeder. 

Matron — Mrs Julius Sehroeder. 

Clerk— W. S. Darrell. 

ASHLEY RIVER ASYLUM. 

Commissioners — R M. Masters, Chairman; L. J. Hol- 
lings, Yice-Chairman; II. W. H. Buck, Secretary; R. H, 
Simons, Patrick Carter, Jno. PL Tietjen, II. N. Pregnall, 
Jno. W. Messervey, Jno. I). Harbers, Jno. II. Wellbrook, 
C. C. Leslie, W. J. Parker. 

Steward — Thomas Osborne. 

Matron— Mrs. W. E. McNeil. 

MARKETS AXD GREEN GROCERS, 

Commissioners — IT. A. Molony, Chairman; W, II. 
Welch, Yice-Chairman; S. H. Wilson, J. C. Blohme, T. 
Allen Legare, G. C. Schmetzer, Dr. R. S, Cathcart, H. C. 
Wohlers, T. H. Reynolds, R. M. Masters, P. II. Gadsden, 
R. 11. Simons, A. W. Todd. 



City Government. xi. 

Chief Clerk— Jno. P. O'Neill. 

Assistant Clerk — Oscar Prause. 

Clerk Weights and Measures — John Duncan. 

MARION SQUARE. 

Commissioners — Col. A. Coward, Chairman; A. F. C. 
Cramer, Geo. B. Edwards, A. W. Marshall, Edward Ander- 
son, C. M. Trott, Henry Schachte. 

COLONIAL COMMON AND ASHLEY RIVER 
EMBANKMENT. 

Commissioners — Caspar A. Chisolm, Chairman; Samuel 
S. Buist, Secretary; Eugene P. Jervey, John M. Rivers, 
Wilson G. Harvey, C. E. Steinmeyer, J. R. Rohertson, R. 
P. Evans, W. E. Roherts, Dr. Manning Simons, the Mayor 
ex-officio. 

BATHING HOUSES. 

Commissioners — Zimmerman Davis, Chairman; A. W. 
Petit, L. E. Williams, John T. Roddy, Theo. Melchers, A. 
J. Riley. 

MANAGEMENT, CARE AND CUSTODY OF 
CONVICTS. 

Commissioners — J. H. Thayer, Chairman; John F. Riley, 
Vice-Chairman; G. C. Schmetzer, Secretary; Alderman 
Theo. Poppen, Alderman T. Allen Legare. 

PARK. 

Commissioners — Samuel Lapham, Chairman; W. P. Car- 
rington, Frank R. Frost, Chas. R. Valk, A. F. C. Cramer, 
Wm. M. Bird, A. A. Kroeg, W. J. Storen, G. W. Williams, 
J. Adger Smyth, Mayor, Secretary, W. G. Jeffords, Jr. 



xii. City Government. 

SEWERAGE DEPARTMENT. 

Commissioners — T. Grange Simons, M. I)., Chairman; 
(Carle Sloan, A. I>. Murray, Secretary; II. F. Bremer, 8. 
G. Stoney, J .Adger Smyth, Mayor, ex-officio; J. Mercier 
Green, M. D., Health Officer, ex-officio. 

FREIGHT BUREAU. 

Commissioners — (J. Walter Mclver, Chairman; W. B. 
Wilson, II. V. Bremer, Geo. B, Edwards, F. S. Hanckel, C. 
Bissel Jenkins, .1. C. Hesse, E. C. Hesse. 

Manager — IT. R. Jackson. 

[NDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR COLORED ORPHANS. 

Commissioners— A. F. C. Cramer, F. R. Frost, 0. C. 
Beckman, Dr. E. F. Parker. 

PLANTING AND PROTECTION OF SHADE TREES. 

Commissioners — Zimmerman' Davis, Chairman; C. A. 
Chisolm, Chas. R. Valk. 

POLICE RELIEF AND PENSION FUND. 

Commissioners — Theo. Melchers, Hugh Ferguson, J. 
Adger Smyth, Mayor Ex-Officio. 

WATER COMMISSIONERS. 

Samuel Lapham, R. G. Rhett, John. F. Rafferty. 





./' 



■i :.■??■■ ■-.■■. m. 






Wm 



:,, 



W. W. Simons, 
Clerk of Council. 



INDEX. 

Page. 

CITY GOVERNMENT iii 

Mayor Smyth's Annual Review xv 

City Treasurer's Report 1 

City Assessor's Report 20 

City Sheriff's Report 41 

Street Department's Report 44 

CORPORATION COUNSEL— 

Report of 51 

CITY SURVEYOR— 

Report of 54 

CITY ELECTRICIAN- 

Report of , 64 

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH— 

Report of 67 

Meteorological Summary for 1903 99 

FIRE DEPARTMENT— 

Report of 106 

CHIEF OF POLICE— 

Report of 130 

PLEASURE GROUNDS— 

Park Commissioner's Report 143 

Marion Square 150 

Colonial Common and Ashley River Embankment 1"1 

BUREAU OF FREIGHT AND TRANSPORTATION— 

Report of 152 

SEWERAGE COMMISSIONERS— 

Report of ' 173 

TIDAL DRAIN KEEPER— 

Report of 184 

PUBLIC MARKETS - 

Report of Commissioners 186 



\iv. Index. 

Page. 

m w \<;i:\ii:.\t of convicts 

Report of Commissioners 187 

l'l \ \ riNCJ OF SHADE TREES 

Report of ( Jommissioners 190 

PORT OF CHARLESTON 

Report of I [arbor Commissioners . . 192 

DEPARTMENT OF CHARITIES 

Charleston Orphan House 195 

Oitj Orphan Asylum 214 

Shirras Dispensary 225 

City Hospital 2;») 

Alms House 249 

William Enston Home 253 

Industrial School 258 

COMMISSIONERS OF PUBLIC LANDS— 

Report of 259 

EDUCATION IN CHARLESTON- 

Superintendent Archer's Annual Report.. . 261 

High SchoM. of Charleston 273 

College of Charleston 279 

ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF CHARLESTON RATIFIED 
DURING THE YEAR 1903 28S 

ACTS OF GENERAL ASSEMBLY PASSED IN 1903 RELATIVE 
TO CHARLESTON 289 



APPENJHX. 

Page. 

Official Action of City Council on Death of Dr. R. B. Rhett 3 

Official Action of City Council on Death of Dr. H. B. Horlbeck 7 

Official Action of City Council Reception Flag— Presented by Alder- 
man C. W. Kollock 9 

Official Action of City Council on Death of B. O'Neill and G. W. 

Williams 12 

An Original Poem by Edward (). G. Brale in 1804 14 




R. G. O'Nealk, 

Mayor's Secretary. 



Mayor Smyth's Annual Review. 



To the City Council of Charleston. 

The Mayor, in accordance with the requirements of the 
City ordinances herewith submits the Annual Report of the 
various departments for the year ending December 31st, 
1903. 

THE DEPARTMENT OF THE CITY TREASURER, 

It is with great pleasure that your attention is again called 
to the financial condition of the City of Charleston, as 
shown in the report of that most reliable and efficient 
officer, the City Treasurer. You will find upon examining 
it that not only has the credit of the City of Charleston been 
fully maintained, but also that the interest on the bonds 
and all other obligations have been either anticipated, or 
paid promptly at maturity. 

PAYMENT OF TAXES. 

The total tax levied and turned over to the City Treasurer 
for collection on the assessment of $17,951,409 00 at 26 

mills, amounted to $466,736 64 

Total amount collected and satisfied during 

the fiscal year 1903 458,102 80 

Leaving balance unpaid Dec. 31, 1903 8,633 84 

Total Levy $466,736 64 

This leaves the very small percentage of .018 unsatisfied 
at the end of the year, and shows that 98.2 per cent of the 
entire levy has been collected and satisfied. From the re- 
ports that have reached us certainly no other city surpasses 
this record. It speaks well for the adminstration and we 
trust will be satisfactory to the taxpayers. 



wi. Mayor Smyth's Annual Review. 

LICENSES. 

Received during the year from business licenses in 1 ( .M):> was. . $77,111 75 
tved during the year from licenses on vehicles was 8,521 00 

Total from Licenses $ 85,632 75 

The decrease in these amounts as compared with those 
received in L902 arises chiefly from the large number of 
new and transient enterprises in operation during the 
Exposition and which were discontinued at its close. 

LIQUOE DISPENSARIES. 

The receipts from the State Liquor Dispensaries show a 
decrease over those for 1902. This falling off is due in a 
large degree to the with-holding of the 1 city's share of the 
profits of Charleston County by the arbitrary action of the 
State Board of Control. 

There was collected and turned over to the City Treasurer by the Clerk of 
the City Court for fines imposed for violations of the City Dispensary 
ordinance $4,975 00 

The expenses incurred for detectives, etc was 1,767 16 

Total net Income to the City $3,207 84 

INTEREST ON DEPOSITS. 

Received in 1903 $7,040 40 

COMMISSIONERS SINKING FUND. 

The transactions in this fund in 1903 were the purchase 
of $10,000 00 City 4 per cent bonds, duly cancelled and de- 
stroyed by order of City Council and the transfer from the 
City to the Commissioners of the Sinking Fund by resolu- 
tion of City Council of the house and lot on the corner of 
Broad, Logan and New Streets. 

TRUSTEES ORPHAN HOUSE FUNDS AND ESTATE. 

The following donations were received by the Trustees of 
the Orphan House Fund in 1903. 
From Estate of Geo. W. Williams ; .$5,000 00 



Mayor Smyth's Annual Review. xvii. 

The assets of this fund are as follows: 

City of Charleston 4 per cent Bonds $197 700 00 

State of South Carolina 4£ per cent stock 38,176 20 

Cash in Bank at 4 per cent interest on daily balances 8,662 36 

The interest from this fund is placed to credit of the 
Orphan House for current expenses. 

THE PUBLIC DEBT. 

The Public Debt has been decreased by the purchase and 
retirement by the Sinking Fund Commission of $10,000 00 
4 per cent bonds due on July and January 1909. 

The total bonded indebtedness of the City of Charleston is 

now " $3,788,200 00 

With a yearly interest of 155,393 00 

CITY ASSESSOR'S REPORT. 

From this valuable report we learn that the assessed 
values for 1903 were as follows; 

Real Estate .$12,593,233 00 

Personal Estate 5,358,176 00 

Total for 1903 $17,951 ,409 00 

An increase of $157,824 00 over 1902. 

The increase in personal returns in 1903 of $93,514 00 is 
especially noteworthy, as it shows a continual yearly in- 
crease in the returns of personal property ever since the 
present Assessor has had charge of this important depart- 
ment. It is the best proof of the energy and unwearied 
attention shown to the city's interests by this efficient and 
devoted official. Especial attention is called to his re- 
commendations, first in reference to an amendment to the 
City Charter extending the limit now fixed to the amount 
of licenses that can be levied hy the City for the reasons 
given by him, and second as to the renumbering of the City, 
which is of the greatest importance. 



wiii. Mayor Smyth's Annual Review. 

\ AUK OF CITY REAL ESTATE. 

This table is repeated as given in the Year Book for 
L902, as furnishing important information. 

City Uea] Estate and Values as report to City Council July 
I, 1901, by Board of Assessors appointed to Assess 
( 'it v Property. 



White Poinl Gardens, South and Eas1 naileries * 185,000 

N"os. 35, 37 South Battery adjoining West 2,000 

Nos. 12, 14 Price's Alley (sewerage dept.) 3,500 

No. 14:5 Broad Street Broad, Logan and New streets) 3,500 

No. 145 Broad Street lot (S. W. corner Broad and New) 800 

Nine Water Lots west end Tradd street 2,000 

Colonial Lake 15,000 

Mill Pond, adjoining Colonial Lake 7,000 

No. 1!) Magazine Street I used by street department) 1,000 

No. 63 Queen Street (used by health department) 1,800 

Nos. 1 14, 116 Meeting street, engine houses 8,800 

No. 46 John street, engine house 2,00() 

Nos. 262, 264 Meeting street engine houses 24,000 

No, 48 Wentworth street, engine house 1450 

Nos. 81, 8:5 Queen Street engine houses 3,000 

Nos. 5, 7 Cannon street, engine houses 10,000 

Central .Market and Dock 16,000 

Alms House 20,000 

Wragg's Square 10,000 

Wragg's Mall 6 000 

Keystone Park 1,000 

Police Station 52 500 

No. 41 '2 King street (used by police department) 5,000 

High School and Grounds 22,000 

Plum Island 430 

Lot Magnolia Cemetery 140 

Chieora Park 30,000 

Givham's Ferry 2,700 

Cannonsboro Wharf and Mill property 2,500 

Hampstead Mall 15,000 

College and Campus 75,000 

Old Folks Home, Potter's Field and Butcher Pens 7,500 

Artesian Well and Lot 5,000 

Bennett's Mall, Lucas street, east 2,000 

No. 18 Vanderhorst street (formerly Upper Market) 1.500 

City Hall and Washington Square 75,000 




Theo. D. Jervky, 
City Recorder. 



Mayor Smyth's Annual Review. 



xix. 



Orphan House and Grounds 150,000 

Cannon's Park and Auditorium 48,000 

City Hospital 100,000 

Riverside Infirmary 25,000 

Nos. 135, 139 Line street (used by street department) 5,000 

Powder Magazine 7,000 

Washington Race Course 32,500 



The following Pieces of Property the Assessors 
unable to Locate : 



220 



were 



W 



iter Lot West End Calhoun Street 

" East End Tradd Street. 
" " " Pinckney street. 
" " " Queen street. 
' " " Society street. 
" " " Calhoun street. 
'' " " Charlotte street. 
'• " " Chapel street. 
" ' " Columbus street. 



XX. 



Mayor Smyth's Annual Review. 



At the close of eighl years services as Mayor, it is a pleas- 
ant duty to render most grateful thanks to the heads of all 
the City Departments, and to their entire corps of assistants 
and to the various Boards of Commissioners for their loyal 
support and to testify to their constanl and unvarying de- 
votion to the interests to the municipality entrusted to their 
care, [n parting from them, and from you, Gentlemen of 
City Council, it is a great happiness to offer to each one ol 
you the hand clasp of sincere friendship and to wish for you, 
oik- and all. health, prosperity and happiness. 

J. ADGER SMYTH, 

Mayor. 




J. O. Lea, 
Citv Treasurer. 






Financial Department. 



CITY TREASURER'S REPORT. 



Treasury Department, January 25, 1904. 

To the Honorable The Mayor and City Council, of Charles- 
ton^. C.: 

Gentlemen : — I respectfully submit the annual statements 
of this department for the fiscal year ending December 31, 
1903, as follows: "Transactions of the Treasury Depart- 
ment," "Commissioners General Sinking Fund," "Com- 
missioners Sinking Fund, Forfeited Lands," "College of 
Charleston," "Trustees Orphan House Funds and Estate," 
"Commissioners Police Relief and Pension Fund," all ex- 
amined and certified to as correct by their respective com- 
mittees. 

Herewith you will also find a consolidated statement from 
the report of transactions Treasury Department, an itemized 
statement of net receipts and expenditures as per appropria- 
tions for the current year, statement of Public Debt, and 
statement of Refund Tax for current year to the different 
manufactories exempted under Ordinance of March 24, 1896. 
Very respectfully, 

J. O. LEA, 
City Treasurer. 



Mayor Smyth's Annual Review 



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Mayor Smyth's Annual Review. 
Consolidated Statements 1903. 



Surplus from L 902, per Balance Sheet $ 32,642 1 ] 

Net Income for 1903 582,826 28 



$_615,468 35 
Net Expenditures as per Appropriations : 

For Current Fear 1903 $ 596,393 09 

Surplus to 1904 19,075 26 

$ 615,468 35 

Net Receipts from all sour. 

Income Account, Balances brought forward, and Trust 

Funds * 669,359 37 

Balance Cash .January 1st, 1903 212,7:5:5 55 



||_W2,092 92 

Net Expenditures for all purposes: 

Appropriations for Current Year 1908, 
Balances brought forward, and Trust 

Funds $ 755,853 63 

Balance Cash, January 1st, 1904 120,239 29— 882,092 92 

Surplus made up as follows : 

( Jasli December 31st $ 126,239 29 

amount due, Trust Funds 107,164 03 



Surplus to 1904 $ 19,075 26 

Total Amount Appropriated = 609,000 00 

Net Amount Expended 596,393 09 

Unexpended balances carried back to In- 
come Account $ 12,606 91— ij> 6 09 000 00 

Respectfully submitted, 

J. O. LEA, 

City Treasurer. 



Financial Department. 9 

Net Receipts Income Account and Net Expenditures as per 
Appropriations for Fiscal Fear Ending December 31st, 
1903. 

Beoeipts. 

To Board Health, rent, etc $ 98 00 

County Dispensaries 21,422 55 

Dispensary Cases, Fines City Court 3,257 84 

Fire Department, Fines per Pay Roll, 25 00 

Interests on Deposits 7,040 40 

Licenses 85,113 20 

Markets 3,366 05 

Miscellaneous 3,421 42 

Penalties 66 79 

Police Department Fines Recorders Court $ 5,575 80 

Sale Clubs 3 00 

' ' Unclaimed Property . . 41 65 

Overpaid on Pay Roll 10 04 

" " Fines from Corporation 

Counsel 73 50 

5,703 99 

Powder Magazine Rent 569 25 

Sheriffs Costs 90 38 

Taxes „ 452,651 41 



$ 582,826 28 
Surplus from 1902 32,642 07 



Expenditukes. $ 615,468 35 

GENERAL GOVERNMENT. 

By City Hall Clock and Chimes $ 1,909 19 

" Incidental Expenses Executive and Treasury 

Department 1,963 00 

" Printing and Stationery 1,324 13 

" Evening Post, publishing proceedings City 

Council and Advertising „ 588 00 

" Mayors' Animal Report (369. 11 was paid from 

Incidental Expenses, Total Cost $1,269.11). . 900 00 

" Salaries City Officers 27,441 67 

$ 34,125 99 



FINANCE. 

Assessors Department, Extra Clerical Help, ac- 
count Licenses and Taxes 350 00 



It) Major Smyth's Annual Review. 

City Bills Redeemed 20 15 

('.muni's Sinking FuimI purchase of $10,000, 4 

per cent Bonds 10,051 75 

Miscellaneous I 362 87 

- * 11,784 77 

CHARITIES. 

By Aim- House (white) $ 9,392 51 

" Board of Health Dispensary 

Physicians 2818 30 

'• Board of Health Druggists 5100 00 

Small Pox Cases and 

Amount Paid City Hospital 2080 05— 9,998 35 

l'.\ City Hospital (white and colored) 23,990 97 

•• Comm'rs Public Lands (Colored Old Folks 

Home) 4,749 02 

" City Orphan Asylum (white) 6 000 00 

" Florence Crittendon Home (white) . . .. 100 00 

" Industrial School Colored Orphans 500 00 

•• Orphan House (white) 10,857 32 

" Piedmont Flood Sufferers 1,000 00 

" Transportation Paupers. 294 4: 



07,192 50 



32 25 




401 44 




800 00 




3,968 G9 




4,314 36 




10,000 00 




27,265 93 




1,399 79 


$48,242 46 



PUBLIC CONVENIENCES. 

By Artesian Well and Lot 

" Commissioners Marion Square 

Planting Shade Trees 

" Freight Bureau 

,; Markets 

" Park Commissioners 

" Street Department (not including cleaning 

streets and seavengering) 

" Surveyor'- Department 



PUBLIC SAFETY. 

By Board of Health (not including Phvsicians, 

Druggists and Small Pox Cases) 9,650 79 

" Charleston Light, Water & Power Co (water 

for Fire Hydrants) 24,999 96 

" City Hospital, Building Insane Ward 1,696 30 

" Commissioners Management Convicts (Chain- 
gang; 4 708 45 

" Lighting City 33,172 00 

" Fire Department 52,600 00 

" Police Department 85,496 32 



Financial Department. 11 

By Street Department, Sea vengering. $25,003 03 

" " " Cleaning 16,088 80—41,09189 

" Rhett Memorial Room City Hospital for 

Surgical Operations, Balance to complete 722 95 

" Tidal Drains ' 5,864 87 

" Sewerage Department 3,576 51 

" Water Commissioners 390 08 

$263,970 12 

EDUCATIONAL. 

(Not including the one mill Statutory Tax 
paid over to Commissioners Public Schools.) 

By Alice Carey Kindergarten Association, (col'd) 100 00 

" Charleston Library Association 100 00 

" College of Charleston, 4,050 00 

" " " Museum 500 00 

" High School 4,500 00 

" McCrady's History 175 00 

" S. C. Military Academy (5 Scholarships)... 1,500 00 

" S. C. Kindergarten Association 300 00 

f 11,225 00 

PUBLIC INDEBTEDNESS. 

By Interest on Bonds $ 155,793 00 

EXTRAORDINARY EXPENSES. 

By City Ordinance Codifying 1,900 00 

" Municipal Election 1,910 35 

" Daughters of the Confederacy 248 90 

$ 4,059 25 

$ 596,393 09 
Surplus to 1904 19,075 26 

f 615,468 35 

Respectfully submitted, 

J. O. LEA, 

City Treasurer. 



I- 



Mayor Smyth's Annual Review. 



Estimates as Submitted and Amounts Allowed For L903 
and L904. By Committee Ways and Means. 



For What Furpose. 




Alms House 

Artesian Well and Lot 

Assessors Office 

\ lice Carey Kindergarten . . 

Board of Health 

City Hall Clock and Chimes.. 

City Hospital 

' ity Hospital, Insane Ward. . 

City Ordinances 

city Hills Redeemed 

City Orphan Asylum 

City Surveyors Department... 

City < Officers 

Charleston Water Works 

Charleston Library 

College of ( 'harleston 

" " " Museum 

Commr's Sinking Fund .... 

( ommr's Puhlie Lands 

Commr's Flant'g Shade Trees 
Commr's Managem'l Convicts 
Commr's Marion Square.. 
Daughters of Confederacy. 

Evening Post 

Fire Department 

Freight Bureau 

Florence Crittendon Home 

High School 

Incidental Fxpenses 

Interest Public Debt 

Endust'l School Col'd Orphans 

Lighting the City 

.Mayors A nnual Report 

Markets 

Miscellaneous Expenses.!! 

Municipal Flection 

Mci'rady's History 

Orphan House. . .* 

Park Commissioners 
Piedmont Sufferers. 

Police Department 

Printing and Stationery..., 
Khett Memorial 
s. C. M i 1 i tary Academy !!'.'. 
s C. Kindergarten Ass'n 

Sewerage Department 

street Department 

Tidal Drains . ..! ' 

Transportation 

Water Commissioners 



$10,500 00 

50 00 

450 00 

100 00 

'JO, 5111) 00 

2,000 oo 

20,000 00 

1,783 43 

1,900 00 

20 15 

6,000 00 

1,400 00 

27,441 67 

33,500 00 

100 00 

4,050 00 

500 00 

10,051 75 

5,500 00 

1,000 00 

4,800 00 

500 00 

250 00 

600 00 

52,600 00 

5,000 00 

500 00 

4,750 00 

2,000 00 

155,703 00 

1,000 00 

33,278 00 

1,000 00 

4,400 00 

1,432 00 

3,000 00 

175 00 

11,500 00 

15,000 00 

1,000 00 

87,000 00 

1,500 00 

725 00 

1,500 00 

500 00 

3,850 00 

75,000 00 

6,000 00 

500 00 

1,000 00 



$9,500 00 

50 00 

350 00 

100 00 

20,000 00 

2,000 00 

21,000 00 

1,710 35 

1,900 00 

20 1 

6,000 00 

1,400 00 

27,441 67 

33,500 (-0 

10 I 00 

4,050 00 

500 00 

10,051 75 

5,500 00 

800 00 

4,750 00 

500 00 

250 00 

600 00 

52,600 00 

4,000 00 

400 00 

4,500 00 

2,000 00 

155,793 00 

500 00 

33,278 00 

900 00 

4,400 00 

1,432 00 

3,000 00 

175 00 

11,275 00 

10,000 00 

1.000 00 

85,500 00 

1,325 00 

725 00 

1,500 00 

300 00 

3,850 00 

68,358 08 

5,950 00 

400 00 

775 00 



$9,392 51 

32 25 

350 00 

100 00 

19,049 II 

1,900 11) 

23,999 97 

1,696 30 

1,900 00 

20 15 

6,000 00 

1,399 79 

27,441 07 

24,999 90 

100 00 

4,050 00 

500 00 

10,051 75 

4,749 92 

800 00 

4,708 45 

461 44 

248 90 

588 00 

52,000 00 

3,968 69 

400 00 

4,)00 00 

1,963 00 

155,793 00 

500 00 

33,172 00 

900 00 

4,314 36 

1,362 87 

1,910 35 

175 00 

10,857 32 

10,000 00 

1.000 00 

85.496 32 

1.324 13 

722 95 

1,500 00 

300 00 

3,576 51 

68,357 82 

5,864 87 

294 43 

300 08 



$629,000 00' $600,000 00 $596,393 09 $610,950 00 $590,000 00 



$10,350 00 

50 00 

1,250 00 

150 00 

•20,0(111 (Ml 

2,000 00 
28,300 00 



7,500 00 

1,525 (to 

27,750 00 

10,850 00 

100 00 

4,050 00 

500 00 

5,250 00 

1,000 00 

4,800 00 

500 00 

600 00 

52,650 00 

6,500 00 

600 00 

4.325 00 

2,000 00 

155,393 00 

500 00 

32,250 00 

1,600 00 

4,400 00 

1,957 00 



11,275 00 
15.000 00 

90,350 00 
1,200 00 

1,500 00 
500 00 

3,800 00 
65,000 00 

2,625 00 
500 00 
500 00 



$9,000 00 


25 00 


1,100 00 


100 00 


19,950 00 


1,900 00 


2(5,500 00 


0.000 oo 


1,500 00 


27,750 00 


40,800 oo 


100 00 


4,050 00 


250 00 


5,000 00 


500 00 


4,750 00 


400 00 


600 00 


52,000 00 


6,000 00 


450 00 


4,250 00 


2,000 00 


155,393 00 


500 00 


32,000 00 


1,100 00 


4,400 00 


1,957 00 


11,000 00 


10,000 00 


88,fJ)0 00 


1,200 00 


1,500 00 


400 00 


3,800 00 


60,000 00 


2,500 00 


400 00 


375 00 



Financial Department. 13 

Statement Public Debt, December 31st, 1903. 



4 Per Cent Bonds due January 1909 $1,498,700 00 

4 Per Cent Bonds due July 1909. $ 999,000 00 

4 Per Cent Bonds due July, 1909 

(clean bonds) 854,000 00— 1,853,000 00 

#3,351,700 00 

5 Per Cent Bonds due October 1 1922 50,000 00 

5 Per Cent Bonds due October 1, 1923 56,000 00 

5 Per Cent Bonds due October 1, 1924 62,500 00 

5 Per Cent Bonds due October 1, 1925 90,000 00 

5 Per Cent Bonds due October 1, 1926 55,000 00 

$ 313,500 00 

5 Per Cent Stock College .' 23 000 00 

4£ Per Cent Bonds due April 1, 1928 90,000 00 

U Per Cent Bonds due October 1, 1928 10,000 00 

— $ 100,000 00 

$3,788,200 00 
Interest on Debt for 1904, $155,393 00. 



Note. — The Public Debt has been decreased during the 
year by the purchase by the Commissioners Sinking Fund, 
of $10,000, 4 per cent Bonds, which were cancelled and 
destroyed. 

Respectfully submitted, 

J. O. LEA, 

City Treasurer. 



11 Mayor Smyth's Annual Review. 

REFUNDED TAXES L903. 

The following amounts were refunded under the ordi- 
nance ratified March 24th, 1896, to Exempt Manufactories. 

Atlantic Woodenware Co., 3rd year exempted $ 78 00 

Anderson Spool & Bobbin Co., 1st year exempted :'>1 20 

( Jonsumers 1 tee ( lompany, 2nd year exempted 527 80 

Charleston Door, Sash & Lumber Co., 3rd year exempted 209 00 

Citizens Ice Company. 3rd year exempted 452 40 

Charleston Canning Company, 1st year exempted 150 00 

Charleston Iron Works, 3rd year exempted G5 00 

Com bahce Fertilizer Company, 2nd year exempted 104 00 

American Cigar Company, 1st year exempted 1 ,-500 00 

Mutual lee Mfg. & City lee Company, 5th year exempted 780 00 

Palmetto Manufacturing Company, 3rd year exempted 200 00 

Percival Manufacturing Company, 3rd year exempted 78 52 

Royal Bag cV Yarn Mfg. Company, 2nd year exempted 2,800 00 

Riverside Box Manufacturing Co., 4th year exempted 96 20 

Simons-Evans Manufacturing Co., 4th year exempted 520 00 

Southern Hardware Company, 4th year exempted 260 00 

$ 7,868 12 

Note. — $306.38 additional was refunded under authority City Council to 
sundry persons for over assessments. 

Respectfully submitted, 

J. O. LEA, 

City Treasurer. 



Financial Department* 15 

Cash Transactions Commissioner's Sinking Fund. From 
January 1st, 1903, to December 31st, 1903. 

Dr. 

To Cash from last annual Statement $ 1.007 57 

" Appropriation Account : 

Amount appropriated by City Council 10,051 75 

" Commissioners Sinking Fund . 

Amount transferred from City to this Fund by 
resolution City Council, May 26th 1903, to 

take up outstanding past due Bonds $ 2.000 00 

Commissioners Sinking Fund Forfeited Lands 200 00— 2,200 00 
To Rent Account : 

Amount transferred from Fire Loan Fund by 

resolution City Council, Nov. 10th, 1903 172 42 

Rent property Cor. Broad and Logan and New 

Streets 37 50— 209 92 

To Interest Account : 

Interest on Jonds purchased 220 00 

Ce. $1 3,689 24 

By Bond Account : 

$10,000.00, 4 per cent Bonds purchased $10,051 75 

" Real Estate : 

Broad, Logan and New Streets 544 77 

' ■ Rents : 

State Taxes 26 65 

Repairs 26 75— 53 40 

' ' Cash Balance 3,039 32 

$13,689 24 
MEMO : — 

Bonds outstanding to be paid by this Fund. 

$1,000 00, 6 per cent Bonds due October 1883. .$ 1,000 00 

500 00. 7 per cent Bonds due October 1888. . 500 00 

300 00, 7 per cent Bonds due October 1893 . . 300 U0 

2,000 00, Fire Loan Bonds at 25c 500 00 

649 75, Old 6 per cent stock 649 75 

$ 2,949 75 

Note. — The $10,000 00, 4 per cent bonds purchased were cancelled and 
destroyed as per report to City Council, December 8th, 1903. 

Respectfully submitted, J. O. LEA, 

Examined and found correct. City Treasurer. 

SAM'L LAPHAM, 
Chr. Com. W. and M. and Commr. Sinking Fund. 



1»; Mayor Smyth's Annual Review. 

i Jash Transactions Commissioners Sinking Fund. (Forfeited 
Lands) from January 1,1903 to December 31, 1903. 



Dr. 

To balance from last annual statement $ 101 42 

" Bond State South Carolina $ 364 39 

" Slate Taxes 35 61 400 00 

$ 501 42 
Cr. 

By amount turned over to the Commissioners Sinking 

Fund .ft 200 00 

" C. 1). Clancy, Repairs Fence 2 00 

" State Taxes 47 52 

• Balance 251 90— $ 501 42 

Assets. 

Gash $ 251 90 

Real Estate, State Assessment 3,585 00 

Personal Bond 115 00 



Respectfully submitted, 

J. O. LEA, 

City Treasurer. 
Examined and found correct. 

SAM'L LAPIIAM, 
Chairman W. and M. Committee. 



Financial Department. 17 

Receipts and Disbursements Police Relief and Pension 
Fund from January 1, 1903 to December 81, 1903. 

Dk. 

To Amount received from Permanent Fund $ 1,550 28 

" Amount received from Aged and Decrepit Fund 775 13 

k Amount received from Interest Account 50 21 

% 2,375 62 

Ce. 

By Amount paid from Aged and Decrepit Fund . . , $ 79 25 

Balance 2,296 37 



$ 2,375 62 



As required by Ordinance ratified December 9th, 
1902, the amount of $ 246.09 has been carried to 
the principal of the Permanent Fund being the 
amount of Aged and Decrepit Fund in excess 
of $500 00, and interest: so that the Funds 
have now to their credit : 

Permanent Fund $ J ,796 37 

Aged and Decrepit Fund 500 00 

ft 2.296 37 



Respectfully submitted, 

J. O. LEA, 

City Treasurer. 
Examined and found correct. 

TIIEO. MELCHERS, 
HUGH FERGUSON, 
Commissioners Police Relief and Pension Fund. 



I s Mayor Smyth's Annual Review. 

Cash Transactions of the Trustees Orphan House Funds and 
Estate, from January 1, 1903 to December 31, 1903. 



Dr. 

To Cash from last annual statement $ 8 54 

I donation Account : 

Estate Geo. W. Williams 5,000 00 

Interesl Account : 

12 months interest, $196,200, 4 per eent. 
bonds $ 7,848 00 

6 months interest $1 500, 4 per cent bonds 30 00 

12 months interest $38,176 20, 4^ per cent 

State stock 1 ,717 95— 9,595 95 

Interest on Deposits 153 82 

$ 14,758 31 

Ck. 

By Bond Account : 

Purchased $1,500, 4 per cent. City of 

Charleston Bonds * 1 500 00 

Interest Account : 

Paid over to the City for current expenses 

Orphan House 9.595 95 

Balance 3,002 36 

$ 14 758 31 

Assets. 

Cash $ 3,602 36 

4 per cent, Bonds City of Charleston 197,700 00 

4i per cent Stock State of South Carolina 38,176 20 

Respectfully submitted, 

J. O. LEA, 

City Treasurer. 
Examined and found correct. 

FRANCIS J. PELZER, 
Chairman Commissioners Orphan House and Trustee 
Orphan House Fund and Estate. 



Financial Department. 19 

Cash Transactions of the City College Fund from January 
1, 1903 to December 31, 1903. 

Dk. 

To Appropriation Account : 

Current expenses $ 4,000 00 

Lights 50 00— $ 4,050 00 

Interest Account: 

12 months interest on $75,500 4 per cent bonds 3,020 00 

12 months interest on $23,000 5 per cent stock 1,150 00— 4,170 00 

$ 8,220 00 

Ce. 

By amound paid Arthur Mazyck, Treasurer 8,220 00 

Assets. 

4 per cent Bonds, City of Charleston $75,500 00 

5 per cent Stock, City of Charleston 23,000 00 

Respectfully submitted, 
J. O. LEA, 

City Treasurer. 
JExamined and found correct. 

CHARLES II. SIMONTON, 
President Board Trustees College Charleston. 






20 Mayor Smyth's Annual Review 



CITY ASSESSOR'S REPORT. 



Charleston, S. C., December 31st, 1903. 

To the Honorable the Mayoi and City Council of Charleston, 
South Carolina : 

Gentlemen- I have the honor to submit my annual report 
of this department for the fiscal year ending December 31st, 
1903. 

The assessed value of real estate and personal property 
returned for taxation is as follows: 

Real Estate $12,593,233 

Personal Property 5,358,170 

Total $17,951,409 @ 26 mills— $466,736.63 



As compared with the assessments for the year 1902, the 
following differences are shown: 

Real Estate— Increase $64,290 00 

Personal Property — Increase 93,514 00 



Total increase for 1903 as compared with 1902 $157,804 00 



The amount for regular applications for Licenses issued is. .$ 77,111 75 

The amount of Licenses assessed is $1,230 00 

The amount of Penalty assessed is 246 00 



Total amount of assessed Licenses and Penalties $ 1,476 00 

The number of permits issued during the year 1903 for the 
erection of new buildings, and old buildings improved, are: 

New buildings 94 permits. Reported cost $180,035 00 

Old buildings improved.. ..103 permits. Reported cost.... 60,960 00 

Total 197 permits. Reported cost $240,995 00 



A detailed statement showing number of permits issued 
in the different wards accompanies this report, to which I 
refer. 




Dan 'i. h. Sinkler, 
Citv Assessor. 



City Assessor's Report. 21 

The record of sales of real estate during the past year 
shows 323 pieces, assessed at f 373,755 ; sold for $645,710 ; an 
advancement of 72.40 per cent over assessments; and 15 
pieces, assessed at $31,495, sold for $23,410, a decrease of 
25.67 per cent on assessments. 

The falling off of the green grocer licenses of several 
hundred dollars is due to some of them forming a combina- 
tion and having a mandamus issued, restraining the city 
from collecting the same. The case came up before Hon. 
Y. J. Pope, Chief Justice of the State, early in February, and 
was ably argued by Mr. George H. Moffett, Corporation 
Counsel, but for some inexplicable reason the decision has 
never been rendered, thereby causing the city the above loss. 
Your attention is called to the fact that our city is being 
operated under a charter which was adopted in 1783, when 
our present progressive city was a provincial town. This 
charter limits our scope in certain matters of considerable 
interest and may well receive consideration from those in 
charge of our city's interest. The maximum charge for a 
license is $500, and heretofore numbers of corporations have 
been charged and regularly paid that amount. In recent 
years, more particularly in the immediate past, there has 
been an amalgamation ^f a number of these large concerns, 
with the result that instead of securing a license of $500 
from each, I am restricted to a single license of that amount ; 
the city's revenue from this source thereby being consider- 
ably decreased, and the burden of revenue falling more on 
those less able to bear it. 

I earnestly recommend the importance of having the city 
re-numbered, The cost of this work would be slight in com- 
parison with the assistance it would give the office, as well 
as being a great public convenience. 

Accompanying the report, I beg to hand the following 
annexed statement, to which I invite your attention. 
All of which is respectfully submitted. 

DAN'L L. SINKLER, City Assessor. 



Mayor Smyth' 's Annual Review. 



A. 

Statemenl of the Description and Value of Personal Prop- 
cii \ Returned for Taxation for 5Tear L903. 



1,160 Morses and Mules $ 74.110 00 

126 Cows 2,840 00 

238 Dogs 2,035 00 

529 Gold and Silver Watches and Plates 40,484 00 

334 Piano Fortes, Melodeons and Cabinet Organs 29,280 00 

298 Carriages, Buggies, etc 23,685 00 

017 Wagons, Drays, Carts, etc 29,100 00 

Merchandise, Money and Credits pertaining to business of 

merchants . 1,512,864 00 

Materials, Machinery, Engines, Tools and Fixtures of 

.Manufacturers 485,645 00 

Moneys ,Bank Bills and Circulating Notes on hand or 

deposited, and all Credits 271,711 00 

Receipts of Insurance Agencies 851,990 00 

Receipts of Express Telegraph and Telephone Companies.. 60,610 00 

Returns of Banks 674,775 00 

Returns of Phosphate Companies 36,872 00 

Stocks and Bonds of all other Companies, Corporations 

and Persons 766,923 00 

Vessels, Boats and other Floating Property 66,490 00 

All other Property, including Household Furniture.. .. 422,76200 

Total value of Personal Property $5,358,176 00 

DAN'L L. 8INKLER, City Assessor. 
Charleston,, S. C, December 31st, 1903. 



City Assessor's Report 23 



B. 



Statement of the Returns of Real and Personal Property 

Assessed for City Taxes for Years 1902 and 1903. 



1902. 

Real Estate $12,528,923 00 

Personal Property 5,264,062 00 



Total Peal and Personal 

Property $17,793,585. 00 @ 28% mills— $507,117 17 

1903. 

Real Estate $12,593,233 00 

Personal Property 5,358,176 00 



Total Real and Personal 

Property $17,951,409 00 @ 26 mills— $466,736 63 

As compared with Assessments for 1902: 

Increase on Real Estate $64,310 00 

Increase on Personal Property 93,514 00 



Total increase for 1903 as compared with 1902 $157,824 00 



DAN'L L. SINKLER, City Assessor. 
Charleston, S. C, December 31st, 1903. 






Jl 



Mayor Smyth's Annual Review. 



<:. 



Applications for City Licenses Issued by City Assessor for 
War L903. 



BUSINESS. 



CLASS I. 

Agences or Companies, each. 

Burglar Alarm Companies, eaeii . . .. 

Bagging Manufacturing Companies 
each 

Breweries, or Agencies of Breweries 
each 

Building and Loan Associations, eacl 

Express Companies, each 

Electric Light Companies, each.. .. 

I >il Refineries, each 

Gas Companies, each 

Mercantile Agencies, each.. .... ., 

Railroad Companies, each 

Railroad Ticket Agencies. beins* all 
persons buying or selling "Railroad 
Tickets other than authorized 
Agents of "Railroad Companif 

Steam Cotton Press, where one 1 
located and worked, each 

Steam Ferry Boat Agencies or Com- 
panies, each 

Steamboat Companies or Agencies foi 
each Steamboat 

Steamship (other than regular lines) 
and Sailing Vessels combined. Com- 
panies or Agencies, each 

Street "Railway Companies, each.. 

Telephone Companies or Agencies. 
each 

Telegraph Companies or Agencies 
each for business done exclusively 
within the City of Charleston, but 
not including any business done to 

or from points without the State 
and not including any business 
'lone for the Government of the 
United States, its Officers or 
Agents, each 

Terminal Warehouse Compani 
Ag< ncies, each 

Water Works Companies, each 



nes or 




$ 25.00 

400.00 

100.00 
50.00 
500.00 
500.00 
75.00 
500.00 
150.00 
500.00 



200.00 
200.00 

150.00 

50.00 



150.00 

500.00 

500.00 



500.00 



500.00 



$ 25.00 

400.00 

100.00 
1,100.00 
500.00 
500.00 
150.00 
500.00 
300.00 
1,000.00 



200. 00| 

200. 00 1 

150.00! 
150.00, 



450.00 
500.00 

1,000.00 



1,000.00 



500.00 



500. 00 500. 00| 



City Assessor's Report. 



25 



Licenses Issued 1903. — Continued. 













BUSINESS. 




@ 


Amount. 


Total. 


Kerosene Oil Companies or Agencies, 










having stationary tanks for re- 










ceiving and storing of oil, each .... 


1 


$500.00 


$ 500.00 


$ 


Agencies of Steam Bakeries, each. . . 


1 


75.00 


75.00 


9,800.00 


CLASS 2. 










Fire and Life Insurance Companies 










or Agencies whose gross premiums 










are $1,000 or less, each 


38 


50.00 


1,900.00 




Those whose gross premiums exceed 










$1,000 but are less 'than $2,000 










each 


17 


100.00 


1,700.00 




Those whose gross premiums exceed 










$2,000 but are less than $3,000, each 


13 


150.00 


1,950.00 




For each additional $1,000 or frac- 










tional part of $1,000 of gross premi- 










ums, each @ $10; 4 @ $160; 4 @ 










$170; 6 @ $180; 4 @ $200; 1 @ 










$210; 1 @ $220; 1 @ $240; 1 @ 










$250; 3 Z $260; 1 @ $280; 1 @ 










$320; 1 @ $360; 1 @ $410; 5 @ 










$500 


34 




8,770.00 




Insurance Companies, other than Fire 






and Life whose gross premiums 










are $2,000 or less 17 @ $50; 2 @ 










$65; 3 @ $80 


22 




1,220.00 


15,540.00 


CLASS 3. 




Phosphate Rock or Manufacturing 










Companies or Agencies, also Fertil- 










izer Companies or Agencies, whose 










gross business is 10,000 tons per 










annum or less, each 


1 


200.00 


200.00 




Those whose gross business exceeds 






10,000 but is less than 20,000 tons 










per annum 


1 


300.00 


300.00 




Those whose gross business is less 






than 50,000 tons per annum 


1 


400.00 


400.00 




Those whose gross business is 50,000 










tons or more per annum 


2 


500.00 


1,000.00 


1,900.00 


CLASS 4. 










Banks, State or Savings, those 










whose capital, surplus and undi- 










vided profits are $200,000 or over. . 


1 


500.00 


500.00 




Those whose capital, surplus and un- 










divided profits are $100,000 or over. 










but less than $200,000 


4 


400.00 


1,600.00 





2G 



Mayor Smyth's Annual Review 



Li< 



s Issued L903. < ouMihhmI. 



BUSINESS. 



1- 



Those whose capital, surplus and un 
divided profits arc $50,000 or over 
bill less than $100,000 

Those whose capital, surplus and un- 
divided profits arc under $50,000 . 

(LASS 5. 



' I ;i w ii Brokers, each 

Money Lenders, Loan, Co-Operative 
or Aid Association, who as contem- 
plated by this Ordinance is one 
who carries on the business of lend- 
ing Ids own or other people's money, 
not as a stock or bond broker, char- 
tered bank, private banker, nego- 
tiator of loans on realty, real es- 
tate agent, or linn of such agents, 
or deals in bonds and stocks as 
herein provided, but who carries on 
the business of lending money on 
persona] security or personal prop 
erty other than stocks and bonds, 
each 



CLASS 6. 

Auctioneers, Real Estate Brokers or 
Stocks, Bonds and other personal 
property, at auction or private sale, 
each 

Brokers, Street 

Brokers, Dealers in Chemicals, Fertil- 
izer Materials 

Brokers in Rice and Cotton 

Rent Agents 

Brokers or Agents, buying and sell- 
ing Futures on a margin, each. . . . 

Merchandise Brokers, dealers other 
than Cotton, Rice or Fertilizer who 
sell only on brokerage or on com- 
mission, here each broker or re- 
cognized firm of brokers not ex- 
ceeding two members 

Coast Ship Brokers 



CLASS 7. 



each 



@ 

$3 

200.00 

400.00 



500 . 00 



75. 
50. 

50. 
50. 
25. 



Amount . 

$1 ,500.00 
100.00 

2,000.00 



100.00 



25. 
25. 



2r,. (Ml 



3,500.00 



00 900.00 
00 100.00 



150.00 
250.00 
300.00 

200.00 



700.00 
50.00 



175.00 



Total. 



4,000.00 



5,500.00 



2,650.00 



375.00 



Billiard or Pool Tables, for 

Ta ble. 

*There are seven Pawn Brokers, two got transferred Licenses from 
Class 5-1. 



City Assessor's Re-port. 



27 



Licenses Issued 1903. — Continued. 





u*? 








BUSINESS. 


En 


@ 


Amount. 


Total. 


CLASS 8. 










Boarding Houses or Hotels, other 










than Sailor, having less than 10 










rooms, each 


$5 


$ 10.00 


$50.00 




Other than Sailor, having less than 




20 rooms, each 


1 


30.00 


30.00 




Other than Sailor, having less than 










50 rooms, each 


1 


50.00 


50.00 




Other than Sailor, having less than 










100 rooms, each 


3 


75.00 


225.00 


355.00 


CLASS 9. 








Bakeries, Steam, each 


1 
21 


75 . 00 


75.00 
525.00 




Bakeries, other than Steam, each .... 


25^00 


GOO. 00 


CLASS 10. 










Barbers, for each chair 


80 


2 . 50 


200.00 


200.00 


CLASS 11. 










Distribution of Advertisement . . ... 


2 


20.00 


40.00 




Bill Posters and Distributors 


2 


35.00 


70.00 


110.00 


CLASS 13. 










Contractors, or firms of such, taking 










or offering to take contracts, not 










exceeding in the aggregate more 










than $500 per annum, each 


41 


5.00 


205.00 




Contractors, or firms of such, taking 










or offering to take contracts not ex- 










ceeding in the aggregate more than 










$1,500 per annum, each 


9 


15.00 


135.00 




Contractors, or firms of such, taking 










or offering to take contracts not ex- 










ceeding in the aggregate more than 










$5,000 per annum, each 


5 


25.00 


125.00 




Contractors, or firms of such, taking 










or offering to take contracts ex- 










ceeding in the aggregate more than 










$5,000 per annum, each 


2 


50.00 


100.00 


565.00 


CLASS 15. 










Academy of Music, Theater or Opera 










House, each 


2 


200.00 


400.00 


400.00 


CLASS 16. 








Cook Shops, each 


25 


10.00 


250.00 


250.00 



28 



Mayor Smyth's Annual Review. 



Licenses Issued L903. -Continued. 



Bl SINESS. 



CLASS 17. 
Sliij) Yards. .Marines or Slips. 

CLASS 19. 
Dye Houses, each 



CLASS 20. 

Green Grocers, or Dealers in Fresh 
Meats (sold elsewhere than in the 
Market) on production of receipl for 
one year's rent in the Market, in 
advance, each 

Other Dealers in Fresh Meats (sold 
elsewhere than in the Market )and 
not Green Grocers, and who are not 
required under the provisions of this 
Ordinance to take out any other 
license 



CLASS 21. 

Dealers in Upland Cotton, and Deal- 
ers in Lice in Barrels, or the equiv- 
alent in Sacks 

Those buying or selling less than 
2.500 bales of cotton, each 

Those buying or 'selling less than 
5.000 barrels of rice. each.. .. 

Those buying or selling 2,500 bales 
of cotton and less than, 5,000 bales, 
each 

Those buying or selling 5,000 barrels 
of rice and less than 10,000 barrels, 
each 

Those buying or selling 5.000 bales of 
cotton and less than 10,000 bales, 
each 



■- - 



CLASS 22. 

Dealers in Sea Island Cotton, or Long 
Staple Cotton: 

Those buying or selling less than 
1,000 packages, each 

Those buying or selling 1,000 pack- 
ages and less than 2,500 packages, 
each 



22 



(a 



50.00 



10.00 



100.00 



Amount. 



50.00 



40.00 



2,200.00 



150.00 300.00 



50.00 
50.00 



100.00 



100.00 



200.00 



50.00 



100.00 



200.00 
100.00 

200.00 

300.00 

200.00 



200.00 



300.00 



Total. 



50.00 



40.00 



2,500.00 



1,000.00 



500.00 



City Assessor's Report. 



29 



Licenses Issued 1903. — Continued. 



BUSINESS. 



u 3 

Sg 



CLASS 23. 

Cotton Pickeries or Buyers and Pack 
ers of Loose Cotton, each 



CLASS 24. 

Agents for or Dealers in Sewing Ma- 
chines, each 

Agents for or Dealers in Bicycles, 
each 

Agents for or Dealers in Bicycles for 
hire, other than regular dealers . . 

Agency, meaning resident person who 
represents non-resident dealers or 
manufacturers, and not to be con- 
strued as meaning regular brokers, 
each 



CLASS 26. 

Dealers in Ice, Coal, Oil, etc., from 
carts or wagons on street, for each 
cart or wagon, exclusive of cart 
license , 

Dealers in Books and Pictures, on 
streets, or canvassers for same.... 

Organ Grinders or Street Musicians, 
per month 

Rubber Balloons, dealer in or on the 
streets, per month 

Dealers in Peddling Goods around 
the city per week, each 

Dealers in Poultry, Fish, Vegetaoies 
or Fruit, on the street, per month. 

CLASS 27. 

Livery Stables 

Dealers in Horses, Mules or Cattle . . 
Stock Yards, for the Feeding of 
Cattle 



@ 



CLASS 28. 

Dealers, whose stock never exceeds 
in value the sum of $50 each 

CLASS 30. 

Dealers in Fruits and Peanuts, with 
stand on street, each.. 



142 



213 



75.00 



40.00 



Amount 



15.00 



25.00 



10.00 

5.00 
5.00 
5.00' 

5.00! 

l.ooi 



50.00 
50.»00 j 

50.00 



5.00 



20.00 



75 00 



80 00 



25.00 100.00 



15.00 



25.00 



20.00 
15.00 
45.00 
20.00 
35.00 
142.00 



100.00 
350.00 

50.00 



1,065.00 



Total. 



75.00 



220.00 



277.00 



500.00 



1,065.00 



20.0ol 



30 



Mayor Smyth's Annual Review. 



Licenses Issued L9U3. Continued. 





U 3 








IUSIN ESS. 




@ 


Amount . 


Total. 












Dealers in Hides and Tallow, Furs 










and Wool, each 


2 


50.00 


100.00 




Dealers in Ice. from Branch [ce 










House, each 


8 


10 . 00 


80 . 00 




Dealers in [ce or Ice House, each.. .. 


3 


100.00 


300.00 




Dealers in lee Cream or Lee (ream 










Saloons, each . 


5 


15.00 


75.00 




Dealers in Junk, wholesale, each.. .. 


2 


75.00 


150.00 




Dealers in Soda Water, sold from 










founts, and Milk Shakes, each.. .. 


70 


10.00 


700.00 


1,425.00 


CLASS 31. 










Dealers in Coal, or Coal "Sards, and 










all importers of coal (except such 










as imported directly by official or 










mechanical or manufacturing or in- 










dustiial enterprises for use by such 










establishment) and all persons 










selling coal from wharves or ves- 










sels shall be deemed liable to a 










coal yard license, each 


4 


100.00 


400.00 




Branch Offices and Yards of Dealers 










in Coal, who have paid the $100 










license and conduct the business of 










branch yards under the same firm 










name, each 


2 


50.00 


100.00 


500.00 












Dealers in Poultry and Country Pro- 










duce, and any and every article of 










trade or merchandise not specially 










named elsewhere in this Ordinance. 










whose annual sales do not exceed 










$2,000, each 


336 


20 . 00 


6,720.00 








Whose annual sales are over $2,000 










and less than $5,000, each 


47 


30.00 


1,410.00 




Those whose annual sales are over 










$5,000 and less than $10,000, each. . 


27 


35.00 


945.00 




Those whose annual sales are over 










$10,000 and less than $15,000, each. 


27 


50.00 


1.350.00 




Those whose annual sales are over 










$15,000 and less than $20,000, each. 


14 


60.00 


840.00 




Those whose annual sales are over 










$20,000 and less than $30,000, each. 


10 


75.00 


750.00 




Those whose annual sales are over 










$30,000 and less than $50,000, each. 


16 


100.00 


1,600.00 


_ 



City Assessor's Report. 



31 



Licenses Issued 1903. — Continued. 



BUSINESS. 



Those whose annual sales exceed 
$50,000, for each additional $1,000, 
$1; 1 @ $110; 1 @ $120; 2 @ $125; 
3 @ $150; 2 @ $1.60; 2 @ $200; 
1 @ $250; 1 @ $350; 1 @ $500 

CLASS 33. 

Fairs, Promenade Concerts, Parties, 
Public Balls, Glass Blowing, Operas, 
Minstrels, Vaudeville and every 
kind of public entertainments of a 
like nature, and to be under police 
regulation, per day or night, each. . 

CLASS 34. 

Foundries and Machine Shops, whose 
gross business does not exceed 
$75,000 



CLASS 35. 

Factories — 
Basket or Crate Factories, operated 

by power other than hand, eacli .... 
Bag (other than Paper) Factories, 

each. . . . 

Barrel Factories, operated by power 

other than hand, each 

Candy Factories, each 

Cotton Tie Factories, each 

Clothing Factories, each 

ITarness Factories, each 

Mattress Factories, each 

Sash and Blind Factories, each 

Soap and Candle Factories, each .... 
Soda Water Factories and Bottlers of 

Soda Water, each 

Furniture Factories, each 

Ice Factories, each 

Paper Box and Envelope Factories . . . 
Metallic Goods Factory, each 

CLASS 36. 

Engravers and Watchmakers, each . . 
Gunsmiths. Locksmiths and Bicycle 

Eepairers, each 

Plumbers and Gasfitters, each 



u 2 



11 



120 




5.00 



4 75.00 



lj 50 . 00 1 
1 100. 00 1 



Amount. 



100.00 
15.00 
10.00 
15.00 
15.00 
15.00 
40.00 
35.00 

25.00 
25.00 
50.00 

20.00J 
15.00 



2,750.00 



21 10.00 

14| 10.00 
161 25.00 



600.00 



300.00 



50.00 
100.00 

100.00 
75.00 
10.00 
30.00 
45.00 
15.00 

120.00 
35.00 

125.00 
25.00 

250.00 
20.00 
15.00 



20.00 

140.00 
400.00 



Total. 



16,365.00 



600.00 



300.00 



1,015.00 



32 



Mm/or Smyth's Annual R< m w. 



Licenses Issued L903. — Continued. 



BUSINESS. 



Painters or Tinners, each 

Shoemakers,each 

I | liolsterers, each 

Artists. Ambrotypists, Daguerreian 01 
Photographers 



( LASS 37. 
Intelligence Office or Shipping Master 

CLASS 38. 

Laundries, Steam, each 

Laundries, Washing and Ironing 
Houses, each 



u ~ 
I - 

eg 



( LASS 39. 

Lumber Yards, Lumber Ponds, othei 
than thorc attached to mills, each. 

CLASS 40. 

Lawyers. Physicians, Dentists and 

Professions: 
Whose gross business does not exceed 

$600, each 

Whose gross business does not exceed 

$1,000, each 

Whose gross business does not exceed 

$3,000, each 

Whoso gross business does not exceed 

$5,000, each 

Whose gross business exceeds $5,000, 

each 

Veterinary Surgeons, each 

Architects, Civil Engineers or Sur- 
veyors, each 



(LASS 41. 

Marble Yards, each 

CLASS 42. 

Mills, Grist, other than horse power, 
each 

Mills. Planing, each 

Mills, Saw, each 

Mills, Pace, doing a business of 20,000 
packages and under, each 



@ 



10.01) 

5.00 

10.00 

25.00 



25.00 

75.00 

37 . 50 

GO . 00 



10.00 

25.00 

50.00 

75.00 

100.00 
20.00 

10.00 



20.00 



30.00 
60.00 
GO. 00 



Amount 



90.00 
70.00 
40.00 

75.00 



25.00 

225.00 
525.00 

GO. 00 



530.00 

725.00 

400.00 

150.00 

300.00 
20.00 

10.00 
60.00 



60.00 

60.00 

120.00 



ll 250.001 250.00 



Tut; i 



835.00 



25.00 



750.00 



60.00 



2,135.00 



69.00 



City Assessor's Report. 



33 



Licenses Issued 1903. — Continued. 



BUSINESS. 



Mills, Rice, doing a business of 30,- 
000 packages and under, each 

Mills, Spice oit Coffee, Sea Foam, 
Self-liaising or Prepared Flours, as 
special business, each 



CLASS 43. 



Newspapers, Daily, Morning , 

Newspapers, Daily, Afternoon. . . . 
Neswpapers. worked by hand, each. . 

Printing Offices, Job 

Printing Offices, Job, hand power. . . . 

Coupon System and Mutual Advertis 

ing Companies or Agencies, each. . 

CI ASS 44. 

Restaurants, Saloons and Cafes, each. 



CLASS 46. 
Stevedores, each. 
CLASS 47. 



Tailors and Merchant Tailors: 

Those employing not over 3 hands. . 

Those employing more than 3 hands, 
and less than 10 hands, for each 
hand employed 

Tailor Shops, not merchants 

CLASS 48. 

Undertakers and Cabinet Makers, 
whose business does not exceed 
$1,000, each 

Whose business does not exceed 
$2,000, estch 

CLASS 50. 

Warehousemen and Wharfmen, who 
are all persons, firms or corpora- 
tions receiving any articles of trade 
or merchandise on storage, either 
on^ wharves, wharf warehouses, 
buildings or stores in any part of 
the city, or who have! piers or 
wharves used for landing or ship- 
ping goods from vessels: 

3 




400.00 
20.00 



150.00 
75.00 
25.00 
50.00 
15.00 

50.00 



30.00 



50.00 



15.00 



5.00 
5.00 



25.00 
50.00 



Amount. 



400.00 



20.00 



150.00 
75.00 
25.00 
50.00 
90.00 

50.00 



180.00 



50.00 



30.00 



110.00 
25.00 



200.00 

50.00 



Total. 



910.00 



540.00 



180 . 00 



50.00 



165.00 



250.00 



i! 



Mayor Smyth's Annual Reoiew. 



Licenses Issued L903. — Continued. 



BUSINESS. 



h 



Whose gross receipts do not exceed 
$3,000, each 

Whose gross receipts do not exceed 
$20,000, each 

CLASS 51. 



Wheelwright and Blacksmith Shops-. 

Wheelwright, one forge, each 

Blacksmith Shops, one forge, each..| n 
Blacksmith Shops, for each addition 

al forge 

Coach, Carriage and Buggy Maker 

and Repairers 



CLASS 52. 

Wood Yards (all parties having paid 
for wood yard licenses, and licenses 
for carts, shall have the privilege 
of offering wood in the streets with- 
out the addition of a huckster's li- 
cense; provided, however, the names 
of the owners of such carts be 
painted thereon), each 

Dealers in Wood, other than keepers 
of regular wood yards, who sell 
from a stock on hand, shall in addi- 
tion to the wood cart license, pay, 
each 



Special Licenses 

Total Classified and Special Licenses 




10. 00 

10.00 

5.00 

25.00 



30.00 



15.00 



80.00 
110.00 

5.00 

25.00 



270.00 



135.00, 



Total. 



250.00 



220.00 



405.00 

1 ,799.75 
$77,111.75 



DAN'L L. SINKLER, City Assessor. 
Charleston, S. C, December 31st, 1903. 



City Assessor's Report. 



35 



D. 

Assessed Returns for Licenses Turned Over to the City 
Treasurer for Year 1903. 



BUSINESS. 



CLASS 2. 

Fire Insurance Companies and also 
Life Insurance Companies having in 
this city one agency or one office 
(local or general), whose gross pre- 
miums, including the renewals de- 
rived through the same, are respec- 
tively $4,000 or less 

CLASS 6. 

Merchandise Brokers 

CLASS 7. 

Billiard or Pool Tables, for each 
Table 

CLASS 8. 

Boarding House or Hotel, other than 
Sailor, having less than 10 rooms, 
each 

CLASS 9. 

Bakers, other than Steam, each. . . . 

CLASS 10. 

Barbers, for each chair 

CLASS 13. 

Contractors, or firms of such, taking 
or offering to take contracts not 
exceeding in the aggregate more 
than $5,000 per annum, each 

CLASS 16. 

Cook Shops, each 






(aj 



Amount. 



160.00 
25.00 

25.00 

10.00 

25.00 

2.50 

25.00 
10.00 



160.00 
175.00 

25.00 

10.00 
50.00 
10.00 

25.00 
60.00 



Total. 



160.00 
175.00 

25.00 

10.00 
50.00 
10.00 

25.00 
60.00 






Mat/or Smyth's Annual Review. 



Assessed Returns for Licenses for L903. Continued. 



BUSINESS. 




in 


\moiinf 


CLASS 26. 






Dealers in lee from Carts on Streets. 


1 


10.00 


10.00 


(LASS 27. 








Stock Yards, for the Feeding of Cattle 


1 


50.00 


50.00 


CLASS 28. 








Dealers, whose stock never exceeds in 
value the sum of $50, each 


8 


5.00 


40 . 00 


(LASS 30. 








Dealers in Tee. from branch iee houses, 
each 


3 

5 


10.00 
10.00 


30.00 
50 . 00 


Dealers in Soda Water, sold from 
founts, and Milk Shakes, each . . . . 


CLASS 32. 








Dealers, whose annual sales do not 
exceed $2,000. each. 


7 


20. 00 


140.00 


(LASS 35. 








Factories : 
Clothing Factory 


1 
1 


15.00 
40 . 00 


15.00 
40 . 00 


Sash and Blind Factories 


CLASS 36. 








Plumbers and Cas Fitters, each. . .. 

Painters, each 

Upholsterers, each 

Photographers, each 


3 
3 
1 

1 


25 00 
10.00 
10.00 
25.00 


75 . 00 
30.00 
10.00 
25.00 


CLASS 40. 








Lawyers. Physicians, Dentists. Chem- 








ists and Professions, whose gross 
business does not exceed $000, each 


4 


10 00 


40 00 


CLASS 41. 








Marble Yards, each 


1 


20.00 


20.00 


CLASS 43. 








Printing Office. Job. hand power, 
each. . 


1 


15.00 


15.00 



Total. 



10.00 



50.00 



10.00 



x 



140.00 



15.00 



1 10.00 



40 . 00 



20.00 



15.00 



City Assessor's Report. 



37 



Assessed Returns for Licenses for 1903. — Continued. 



BUSINESS. 


U 3 

C QJ 


@ 


Amount. 


Total. 


CLASS 47. 










Tailor Shops, not merchants 


1 


5.00 


5.00 


5.00 


CLASS 51. 










Wheelwrights, one forge, each 

Blacksmith Shops, one forge, each. . 


8 
1 


10.00 
10.00 


80.00 
10.00 


90.00 


CLASS 52. 










Dealers in Wood, other than keepers 
of regular wood yards, who sell 
from a stock on hand, shall, in addi- 
tion to the wood cart license, pay, 








< 


each 


1 


30.00 


30.00 


30.00 
9.4fi on 


Penalty 20 per cent 








i ' 


Total Assessed Licenses and Penalties' 




' 1. .$1,476.00 



DAN'L L. SINKLER, City Assessor. 
Charleston, S. C, December 31st, 1903. 



38 



Mayor Smyth's Annual Review. 



E. 

Statemenl <>l" the Number of Permits [ssued for New Build- 
ings and <>I<1 Buildings [mproved for the Year 1!)(K>. 



NKW IU!ILI)IN(!S. 



94 Permits — Reported Cost 

Distribution in the City as follows: 

Ward 1 1 Permits. 

Ward 2 

Ward 3 2 



$180,035 



Ward 
Ward 
Ward 
Ward 
Ward 
Ward 
Ward 

Ward 11 48 

Ward 12 14 



Reported Cost $ 10,000 

Reported Cost 

Reported Cost 72,095 

Reported Cost 300 

Reported Cost 1,000 

Reported Cost 11,700 

Reported Cost 2,200 

Reported Cost 14,100 

Reported Cost 4,400 

Reported Cost 9,970 

Reported Cost 47,035 

Reported Cost 7,235 



Total 94 



Total Reported Cost. .$180,035 



City Assessor's Report. 



39 



OLD BUILDINGS IMPROVED. 

103 Permits— Reported Cost $60,960 

Distribution in the City is as follows: 



Ward 


1 


Ward 


2 


Ward 


3 


Ward 


4 


Ward 


5 


Ward 


6 


Ward 


7 


Ward 


8 


Ward 


9 


Ward 


10 


Ward 


11 


Ward 


12 



1 6 Permits. 

6 

11 

9 

6 

12 

9 

7 

7 



16 



Total. 



103 



Reported Cost $ 2,780 

Reported) Cost 2,175 

Reported Cost 6,425 

Reported Cost 27,705 

Reported Cost 2,790 

Reported Cost 3,625 

Reported Cost 2,380 

Reported Cost 3,065 

Reported Cost 705 

Reported Cost 3,900 

Reported! Cost 2,260 

Reported Cost 3,150 

Total Reported Cost. . .$60,960 



TOTAL OF NEW BUILDINGS AND IMPROVEMENTS. 



New Buildings 94 Permits. 

Old Buildings improved. .. .103 Permits. 



Reported Cost $180,035 

Reported Cost 60,960 



197 Permits. Total Reported Cost. $240,995 



DAN'L L. SINKLER, City Assessor. 
Charleston, S. 0., December 31st, 1903. 



10 



Mayor Smyth's Annual Review. 



F. 

Comparisons of Assessments Willi Sales of Real Estate for 
the Year L903. 



w \i;ds. 


Number 
of 
Pie< 


Amount 
of 

Sales. 


Amount 
of 

Assess- 
ment s. 


Advance 
over 

Assess- 
ments. 


■+■5 

C 
o 
o 


Ward 1 


15 
is 
17 
17 
17 
18 
19 
21 
22 
20 
86 
53 


$ 60,270 

55,830 
69,200 
63,660 

50,845 
44,575 
45,130 
15,155 

2:;, (is:, 
21,405 
86,810 
79,145 

$645,710 


$ 34,655 
39,400 

37,525 
40,650 
32,980 
28,400 

21,885 
29,200 
14.220 
14,385 
48,160 
32,295 


$ 25,615 
16, 130 
::i ,675 
23,010 
17.865 
16,175 
23,245 
15,955 
9,465 
7,020 
38,650 
46,850 


7:;. in 


Ward 2 


41 .70 


Ward 3 


84.41 


Ward 4. . . 


56.65 


Ward 5 


53.62 


Ward 


56.95 


Ward 7 


106.21 


Ward 8 


54.G4 


Ward «) 

Ward 10 


66.56 

48.80 


Ward 11 


80.25 


Ward 12 


145.06 






Toalt : .... 


323 


$373,755 


$271 955 


72.40 


323 Pieces sold above Assessments 




. .$645,710 
. . 373,755 


$271,955 


Amount of Sales 

Amount of Assessments 




Per Cent of Sales above Assessments. . 


$ 


72 40 


15 Pieces sold below Assessments 


8,085 00 


Amount of Assess] 
Amount of Sales 


ICllI - 


.$31,495 
. . 23,410 




ve Sales 






25 67 













DAX'L L. SIXKLKK. City Assessor 
Charleston, S. <\. December 31st, 1903. 



Glenn E. Davis, 
City Sheriff. 



City Sheriff's Report. 41 



CITY SHERIFF'S REPORT. 



Office of City Sheriff, 
Charleston, S. 0., January 1st, 1904- 

To the Honorable the Mayor and City Council: 

Gentlemen — I respectfully submit the following report of 
the business of this office for the year ending December 31st, 
1903 : 

Tax executions for the year 1903 have only recently been 
placed in my hands. 

Taxes marked "Nulla Bona" by order of the Committee of 
Ways and Means were for over assessments, duplicate re- 
turns, and property removed from the city prior to issuing 
of executions. 

Over four hundred informations, commitments and jury 
summons in connection with trials by City Court for viola- 
tions of Dispensary Ordinance, were served through this 
office; The lines imposed were collected promptly, and in 
only one case had the alternate sentence of imprisonment to 
be enforced. 

Very respectfully, 

GLENN E. DAVIS, City Sheriff. 



Mayor Smyth's Annual //« vu w. 

Collected l»v City Sheriff During the Fiscal Year 
Ending December :Usi, L903. 



COLLECTIONS l\ MONTHS. 

January. . .'Pax 1900 $ 

January. . .Tax 1901 

January. . .Tax: 1902 

February.. Tax 1901 

February. .Tax! 1902 

March Tax 1901 

March Tax 1902 

April Tax 1.901 .. .. 

April Tax 1902 

May Tax 1900 

May Tax 1901 

May Tax 1902 

,lune Tax 1901 

Juno Tax 1902 

-Inly Tax 1900 

July Tax 1901 

July Tax 1902 

August Tax 1901 

August Tax 1902 

September. Tax 1902 

October Tax 1900 

October Tax 1901 

October.... Tax 1902 1,404 31 

November . Tax 1901 203 95 

November .Tax 1902 45 92 

November .Tax 1903 3,373 81 

December.. Tax 1901 9 00 

December. .Tax 1903 3,040 02 



17 


hi; 


4 80 


1,298 


L9 


17 


55 


846 


35 


2 


(HI 


1 .054 


05 


2 00 


748 00 


130 


60 


22 


so 


(502 


2:» 


48 00 


101 


92 


29 50 


30 


on 


414 42 


25 


00 


1 3!) 


27 


1 H 


53 


27 


29 


23 


90 



SCHOOL TAX COLLECTED. 

January. . . Tax 1901 $ 16 

January. ..Tax 1902 42 25 

February. .Tax 1901 59 

February.. Tax 1902 27 95 

March Tax 1902 29 67 

April Tax 1902 25 30 

May Tax 1900 1 60 

May Tax 1901 45 

May Tax 1902 35 71 

June Tax 1901 1 60 



$13,873 09 



City Sheriff's Report. 



43 



Taxes Collected by the City Sheriff During the Fiscal Year 
Ending December 31st, 1903. — Continued. 



June Tax 1002. 








6 40 




July Tax 1900. 








15 




July Tax 1901. 








1 00 




July Tax 1902. 








14 42 




August Tax 1902. 








82 




September. Tax 1902. , 








4 65 




October Tax 1900. 








2 05 




October.... Tax 1901. 








1 07 




October Tax 1902. 








47 16 




November .Tax 1901. 








3 23 




November .Tax 1902., 








8 12 




November . Tax 1903 . , 








120 00 




December. .Tax 1901. 








27 




December. .Tax 1902. 








50 




December. .Tax 1903. 








108 63 

$ 


483 81 


Penalties and costs collected. . . . 








186 47 


License executions collected. . . . 






322 50 


Judgments — Tax 1894 


and 1895, 


includ 


ing school 






tax 










558 24 


Collections for fines : 


imposed by City 


Court for 






violations of Dispel 


isary Ordinance. . 




. 


5,025 00 


Total 


.$20,449 11 


Executions marked "~. 


Nulla Bona" for reasons assigned. . . 
with City Treasurer 


. 4,990 86 


Total settlement , 


$25 439 97 




RECAPITULATION. 






Tax 1894 






$ 


149 82 
350 88 
211 05 
389 00 
6,859 21 
6,413 83 




Tax 1895 










Tax 1900 










Tax 1901 










Tax 1902 










Tax 1903 










School Tax 








541 35 

186 47 

322 50 

5,025 00 




Penalties and costs. . 










Licenses 










Fines City Court. . . . 




















$20,449 11 








Nulla Bona 










4,990 86 












$25,439 97 



Respectfully submitted, 

GLENN E. DAVIS, City Sheriff. 



II Mayor Smyth's Annual Review. 



STREET DEPARTMENT. 



Office of Superintendent of Streets, 

Charleston, S. C, January 1st, !!)<)'/. 

To the Mayor <nt<l Aldermen of the City of Charleston: 

Gentlemen — I have the honor to submit my annual reporl 
of receipts and expenditures, and the work done by this 
department for the year L903. 

RECEIPTS. 

Balance carried from last year $ 600 84 

General appropriation Maintenance account.. .. 35,000 00 

Genera] appropriation — Scavenger account 25,000 00 

Miscellaneous accounts — Betterment account. . . . 21)7 75 

Extra appropriation — Betterment account 3,358 08 

Genera] appropriation — Betterment account 5.000 00 

Talk improvement — Betterment account 25.672 54 

Repairs to Streets — Plumbers, etc 174 26 

Repairs to Streets— Bell Tel. & T. Co 219 69 

Repairs to Streets— Am. Pipe Mfg. Co 490 12 

Condemned mules and carts sold 210 05 

Manure sold 115 00 

County Charleston — For oyster shells 6 00 

C. A. Chisohn — For cement gravel 7 50 

Park Commissioners — For cement gravel 141 25 

B. 11. Rut ledge— For filling 5 00 

Superintendent Lights — For repairs to streets.. 17 00 

So. E. Lime & C. Co. — For crushed rock 00 

.1. M. Connelley- For crushed rock '.) 50 

('.('. Ry. G. & E. L. Co.— For paving King street. . 1,888 95 

C. C. Ry. G. & E. L. Co.— For raising Calhoun St. . 363 17— $98,591 70 




J. B. Kkckeley, 
Superintendent of Streets. 



Street Department. 45 



EXPENDITURES. 

Scavenger Department- -General $ 4,957 43 

Scavenger Department — Forage 0,000 83 

Scavenger Department — Repairs 1 ,552 22 

Scavenger Department — Labor 12,214 10 

General Police 10,088 80 

General Repairs 4,000 94 

Lumber account 584 56 

Brick account 401 60 

Hardware and brooms 182 38 

Expense account 1,880 35 

Meeting Street Shell Road 409 10 

Concord Street Shell Road 244 15 

Shell, gravel and sand 564 61 

Sidewalks— Brick— Repairs 795 95 

Sidewalks— Flagstone— Repairs 342 83 

Roadways— Block 774 42 

Roadways— Cobble 232 28 

Roadways— Cement Gravel 2,077 66 

Roadways — Macadam 235 18 

Drains— Brick 041 21 

Drains— Pipe 057 18 

Lime and cement 400 65 

Curb and Crossings— Wood 801 20 

Curb and Crossings — Stone.. .. 193 51 

Filling streets and sidewalks 1,565 17 

Hudson Street improvement 305 70 

Crushed rock account 1.941 25 

Granite block account 180 15 

New Pipe Drains — Fishburn lot 1,457 77 

New Pipe Drains — President Street 352 72 

New Pipe Drains— Short Street ,. . . 73 30 

New Pipe Drains — Court House Square 06 25 

New Pipe Drains— Ashley Avenue 498 12 

New Block Road— King below Tradd 3,750 70 

Vitrified Brick Road— George Street .. 2,045 40 

New Macadam Road — Ashley Avenue 4,241 56 

New Macadam Road— South Street 2,134 12 

New Macadam Road — Reid, Meeting to King. . . . 1,092 90 

New Macadam Road — Reid, Hanover to America . . 520 82 

Widening Ashley Avenue 2,006 75 

Rep. Block Roads, Meeting, Rutledge, Calhoun... 1.082 53 

Raising east end Calhoun Street 2,289 45 

Improvement Franklin Street 988 25 

Improvement Montague Street 80 00 



MJ Mayor Smyth's Annual Review. 

New concrete sidewalks 11,630 51 

Sea wall 'Ira. 1,1 Street 513 55 

Mixing Plant Line Shoot '359 30 

I'pper Market lot DO 15 

Mara. lam Una. I Pitt Shoot 1,153 04— $98,591 44 

Balance in Treasury 20 



With the amount received for bettermenl account the 
following new work has been accomplished: 

NEW ROADS. 

Sq. Yds. 

King Street, from Tradd to Ladson, Belgian Blocks 1,741 

( teorge Street, from Meeting to Anson, Vitrified Brick 1,366 

Ashley Avenue, from Bull to Calhoun, Macadam 2,408 

South Street, from America to Drake, Macadam 1,055 

Pitt Street, from Baufain to Wentworth, Macadam 877 

Reid Street, from Meeting to King, Macadam 1,306 

Reid Street, from Hanover to America, Macadam.. ..Not completed 

TERRA COTTA PIPE DRAINS. 

Size Pipe, Length 

Inches Feet. 

Fishburn Lot 18 330 

Fishburn Lot 12 3,676 

Fishburn Lot 8 1,124 

President Street 18 400 

President Street 8 71 

Short Court 12 210 

Court House Square 10 150 

Ashley Avenue, from Bull to Calhoun 12 700 

Ashley Avenue, from Bull to Calhoun 8 131 

CONCRETE SIDEWALKS. 

Sidewalks. Gateways. 

Sq. Yds. Sq. Yds. 

E. Church, between Broad and Tradd 415.28 23.40 

S. Hasell, front Trinity Church 91.88 

N. Chalmers, between Church and engine house . . 185.66 18.40 

N. Beaufain, between Archdale and Coming 316.69 

E. Legare, between Tradd and Lamboll 464.10 45.60 

S. Tradd, w. of Legare 133.00 8.40 

E. Rutledge, s. of Broad 159.19 24.33 

E. Savage, s of Broad 86.46 30.00 

W. Logan, "between Broad and Queen 265.12 24.18 



Street Department. 47 

W. Smith, between Bull and Montague 250.99 37.41 

E. Legare, from I^amboll south 100.62 10.44 

S. Bull, from Coming to Pitt 308.10 36.87 

E. Meeting, front Commercial Club 213.70 

S. Vanderhorst, from St. Philip to Coming 187.50 27.74 

E. St. Philip, from Vanderhorst to Radcliffe 233.80 52.20 

N. Laurens, e. of Bay 404.00 20.90 

E. America, from South to Amherst 293.30 38.92 

N. Warren, from St. Philip to Thomas 429.19 153.69 

E. Rutledge, n. of Calhoun 334.95 8.38 

W. Rutledge, between Spring and Bogard 201.43 44.55 

N. Spring, between Coming and Rutledge 293.00 26.00 

W. Rutledge, between Bogard and Line 204.11 56.98 

N. Wolfe, between King and Railroad 178.02 36.70 

N. Spring, between Laurel and Rose Lane 164.64 18.41 

N. Wolfe, between Railroad and Meeting 216.73 60.01 

S. Charlotte, between Alexander and Washington. 229.25 66.19 

N. Laurens, Concord to Wharf Street 95.37 3.82 

N. W. Cor. Calhoun and Alexander 98.91 

E. Savage, a of Broad 219.11 29.67 

S. Wentworth, between Rutledge and Ashley.. .. 313.07 30.32 

7,087.17 933.90 

Sq. Yds. 

Sidewalks were laid 4 inches thick 7,087.17 

Gateways were laid 5 inches thick 933.90 

Total 8,021.07 

MISCELLANEOUS WORK. 

Purchase of property to widen Ashley Avenue. 

Repairing block road, Meeting, Rutledge and Calhoun. 

Raising Calhoun street from Alexander to East Bay. 

Raising Franklin Street from Broad to Queen Street. 

Relaying sidewalks from Broad to Queen Streets. 

Reparing Sea Wall at foot of Tradd Street. 

Erecting mixing plant for tar, &c, Line Street. 

Removing building Upper Market and fencing lot. 

Laying shell road, Concord, from Market to Pinckney. 

Laying brick sidewalk, N. Warren, from Thomas to Smith. 

Relaying sidewalk and curbing W. America, from South 
to Reid ; 

In justice to the retired Committee on Streets, I would 
state that I have on hand a considerable amount of material 



1:8 Mayor Smyth 1 s Annual Review. 

which will be available for use by their successors, and which 
1 es1 iinate as follows: 

Belgian Blocks 3,000 

Castings pounds 9,000 

Crushed rock cubic yards GOO 

MAINTENANCE ACCOUNT. 

The increase in wages paid to street sweepers and the 
number of paved streets to be kept in order, required a 
greater sum to be expended for maintenance 1 account proper 
than in former years, but 1 have been able to make the follow- 
ing improvements, besides making all necessary repairs to 
streets and sidewalks, curbs and crossings, cleaning and 
repairing, drains, &c. 

Filling and raising Ogier Street, from Calhoun to Vander- 
horst. 

Filling and raising Gadsden Street, from Montague to 
X. End. 

Raising sidewalk and roadway, Aiken Street, from Cooper 
to Mall. 

Filling and curbing sidewalks around Royal Hag Factory. 

MEETING STREET SHELL ROAD. 

To keep this road in order, 5,464 bushels of oyster shells 
were used, which, together with the labor of hauling, distrib 
uting and spreading the same, all of which was done by the 
Scavenger Department, and only the wages of the carter 
charged to the road, made the cost of maintenance #4(1!) 
10-100. 

SCAVENGER DEPARTMENT. 

With the sum appropriated for maintenance of this depart- 
ment T have been, able besides paying all the running ex- 
penses, to make the following purchases, which were much 
needed : 

New Carts 17 

Mules 4 

New Wheels Pair 12 

New Harness Sets 20 

Saddle Pads Dozen 2 



Street Department. 49 



DEAD ANIMALS MOVED. 

The following dead animals were moved beyond the city 
limits and disposed of during the year : 

Horses 283 

Cows 48 

Calves 22 

Sheep 1 

Camel 1 

Deer 1 

Total 35G 

In conclusion, I append a statement from Mr. Jervey, 
Superintendent of Scavenger Department, or work done 
during the year, which speaks for itself. 
Very respectfully, yours, 

J. B. KECKELEY, 
Superintendent of Streets. 



50 Mayor Smyth's Annual Review. 



REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT OF CITY SCAVENGER 
DEPARTMENT. 



Charleston, S. C, January 1st, 1904. 

Mr. J. li. Keclceley, Superintendent of Streets: 

Dear Sir — I respectfully submit the following work done 
by this department for the year ending December 31, 1903: 

Loads Hauled. 

( [arbage 41,483 

Sweepings 6,815 

Sand Filling 7,493 

Bricks in 187 

Bricks out 181 

Debris 3,144 

Curbing 100 

Flags 68 

Paving Blocks 112 

Cinders 1,300 

Pipes 563 

Gravel 386 

Miscellaneous.. 6,232 

Shells 641 

Cobbles 21 

Paper , 2,828 

Sawdust 101 

Pavers Cart 700 

Total 72,355 

I cannot close this report without thanking Messrs. T. S. 
McCarrel and O. H. Wilson for the efficient and zealous 
manner in which they have assisted me in carrying out this 
work. 

Respectfully submitted, 

J. D. JERVEY, 

Superintendent Scavenger Department. 




George H. Moffett, 
Corporation Counsel. 



Corporation Counsel's Report. 51 



CORPORATION COUNSEL'S REPORT, 



Office of the Corporation Counsel,, 
Charleston, S. C, December 31st, 1903. 

To the Honorable the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of 
Charleston, 8. C: 

Gentlemen — I have the honor to submit my report as 
Corporation Counsel for the year ending December 31, 1903. 

I have been consulted by the Mayor, by certain Aldermen 
of the city and by the heads of the various departments of the 
city, from time to time, and have given fifty-six written opin- 
ions on matters submitted to me throughout the year. 

LITIGATION. 

The following litigated matters have had my attention for 
the past year : 

The State, ex relatione J. D. Welch vs. the City Council of 
Charleston. 

An Alternative Writ of Mandamus and Injunction was 
issued against the City Council in this suit, at the instance 
of J. D. Welch to test the validity of that portion of the 
License Ordinance for 1903, relating to Green Grocers. It 
was claimed that the requirement of stall rent from Green 
Grocers doing business outside of the Market was unconsti- 
tutional. The application was made before Chief Justice 
Pope and the hearing had at Chambers in February, 1903. A 
decision has not as yet been filed and the case is still pending 
ia the Supreme Court. 

Sophia F. S. Marion vs. The City Council of Charleston. 

This was an action for the cancellation of the deed exe- 
cuted by Mrs. Marion to the City Council of Charleston 
whereby she conveyed certain streets to the city of Charles- 
ton through her property lying north of Shepherd street and 
extending from King Street to Rutledge Avenue, and for 



Mayor Smyth's Annual Review. 

damages in the sum of one hundred thousand ($100,000) 
dollars. In this case there was interposed a demurrer, which 
was overruled and appeal taken to the Supreme Court. The 
argument was had in the Supreme Courl in November. A 
decision has not been filed and the case is still pending in 
the Supreme < Jourt. 

The State vs. Anna Pattani. 

This was an appeal from the Police Courl to the Courl of 
General Sessions, in which it was claimed thai the ad creat- 
ing the Police Courl of the city was unconstitutional, and 
thai the Police Courl really had no existence in law. The 
case of the city was represented by {he Corporation Counsel 
on appeal and the ad establishing the court was held to be 
constitutional. 

The State vs. R. V. Lilleston, Jr. 

This was a proceeding on the bond of the defendant given 
in the Police Court. A compromise was effected and the 
sum of $73.50 collected and turned over by me to the City 
Treasurer. 

TITLES EXAMINED. 

The following titles for the city have been examined and 
when necessary I have drawn and superintended the execu- 
tion of the deeds of conveyance. 

1. Market Hall. 

2. Upper Market. 

3. Property at the corner of Calhoun and Mill and Lucas 
Streets. 

4. Property east side of Ashley Avenue purchased from 
A. IT. C. Boette. 

5. Rhett Farm. 

6. Property purchased from Atlantic Coast Line adjoining 
Chicora Park. 

CONTRACTS AND AGREEMENTS. 

I have prepared in duplicate or triplicate when needed the 
following contracts and agreements: 

Right of way Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Company 
through Chicora Park. 



Corporation Counsel's Report. 53 

J. T. Snelson Contracting- Company for concrete paving. 

Deed Oitv Council of Charleston to Mrs. Mattie Reynolds 
Riggs, property on Wall Street. 

Agreement Board of Park Commissioners and New York 
Continental Jewell Filtration Company. 

Lease R. L. Gilliland— Broad and Logan Streets. 

Evening Post Publishing Company — Contract for print- 
ing. 

Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company — Agree- 
ment as to poles used by the city. 

ORDINANCES. 

Prom time to time throughout the year Ordinances have 
been prepared by me when requested by his Honor the Mayor, 
or by the various departments of the city. 

In addition to this, under resolution of Council, together 
with the Clerk of Council and the Mayor's Secretary, I have 
prepared the revision of the Ordinances of the City, and pre- 
pared the special report with recommendations for changes 
in the Ordinances made by the Special Committee, appointed 
by Council, consisting of his Honor the Mayor, the Chairman 
of the Committee of Ways and Means, and myself. All the 
Ordinances of the City have been carefully revised and the 
necessary changes made for the enforcement of penalties and 
the elimination of those Ordinances or portions thereof 
which have been declared unconstitutional by the courts or 
have been repealed by subsequent legislation. 

Under the resolution of Council, reports have been made 
monthly of the disposition of Dispensary cases placed in my 
hands by his Honor the Mayor. During the past year ses- 
sions of the City Court have been held monthly, and convic- 
tions secured on Informations taken out by the Corporation 
Counsel for violation of the Dispensary Ordinances of the 
City in one hundred and three cases. 

Respectfully submitted, 

GEORGE H. MOFFETT, 

Corporation Counsel. 



»l Mayor Smyth's Annual Review 



CITY SURVEYOR'S REPORT. 



Charleston, S. C., December 31st, 1903. 

To the Honorable the Mayor and City Council : 

Gentlemen : — In conformity with Section 658, General 
Ordinances, I have the honor to submit herewith my 
Annual Report of the transactions and business of this de- 
partment for the year 1903. 

Allow me in presenting this Report to acknowledge on 
behalf of myself and my associates your many courtesies 
and to express our appreciation of the consideration of 
which we have been the recipients in the discharge of the 
duties of the office. 

Very respectfully, 

J. H. DINGLE, 

City Surveyor. 




J. H. Dingle, 
City Surveyor. 



City Surveyor's Report. 55 

REPORT OF CITY SURVEYOR'S DEPARTMENT, 

1903. 

Appropkiations. 

Office Assistants $1,080 00 

Care Fare, Stationery, Drawing Material, etc 220 00 

Type-writer 100 00 



$1,400 00 

EXPENDITURES. 

Office Assistants $1,060 00 

Oar Fare, Stationery, Drawing material, etc 219 79 

Type-writer 100 00 

Balance 21 

$1,100 00 
DRAINS (LAID OR CONTEMPLATED) 

For which levels were taken, profiles furnished and grade pegs set ; 

Anson Street from Pinckney to the northward 237 feet 

Ashley Avenue " Bull. ... "Calhoun 700 " 

Carolina Street " Perry -'Tracy 405 " 

Carolina Street ... " Tracy ... "St. Philip 689 '• 

Coming Street " Fishburne " Sumter 578 " 

Court House Square. . . " Meeting., "westward 150 " 

Exposition Park 224 " 

Exposition Park 288 " 

Fishburne Street from Rutledge. .to Perry 343 " 

Fishburne Street " Tracy...." St. Philip. 689 " 

Nassau Street " Cooper..." Sheppard ....150 " 

President Street " Cannon..." Spring 403 " 

Sheppard Street " Nassau..." Meeting 407 " 

Short Court " President westward 220 " 

CURBS AND SIDEWALKS. 

For which levels were taken, profiles furnished and grade pegs set : 

America Street both sides from South to Reid 200 feet each side 

Ashley Avenue both sides from Bull to Calhoun 923 " " " 

Bull Street, south side from Coming to Pitt 443 " 

Alexander Street, east side from Calhoun to northward. .200 " 
Alexander Street, east side from Calhoun to southward. . .200 '' 

Calhoun Street, both sides from East Bay to Wall 750 " 

Charlotte St,, south side from Alexander to Washington. 533 " 

Franklin Street both sides from Broad to Queen 519 " 

Ogier Street both sides from Calhoun to Vanderhorst 595 " each side 

Rutledge Avenue east side from Broad to Tradd 715 " 

Savage Street both sides from Broad to Tradd 950 " " " 

Warren Street north side from Thomas to Smith 300 " 

Wentworth Street south side from Ashley to Rutledge. . .426 " 
Woolfe Street north side from Meeting to King 693 " 



56 



Mayor Smyth's Annual Review. 



For w lii.h levels were tak 

Alexander Street from 

Alexander Street " 

Ashley Avenue '' 

Calhoun Street '• 

Calhoun Street " 

Cooper Street " 

Franklin Street " 

Gadsden Street " 

George Street " 

Harnpstead, east and North 

1 lasell Street. from 

King Street " 

Line Street " 

Line Street " 

Montague Street ... . " 

Morris Street " 

Pitt Street " 

Radcliffe Street " 

Reid Street " 

Reid Street " 

Reid Street " 

Rutledge Avenue. ... " 

Savage Street " 

South Street " 

St. Philip " 

Water Street " 



ROADWAYS, 
en, profiles furnished and grade pegs sel : 

Calhoun northward 400 

Calhoun southward . 400 

Bull to Calhoun 923 

Meeting ' Rutledge 3,105 

East Bay. ..." Wall H00 

Meeting " Bay 2,057 

Broad " Queen L62 

Beaufain " Halsey's Mills 1,500 

Meeting .... " Anson 550 

of Mall 431 



feet 



Meeting . 

Tradd... 

Meeting. 

King 

Rutledge 

King. . . . 

Beaufain 

King. . . . 

Hanover. 



to King 578 

'• Ladson 723 

" Aiken 979 

" St. Philip 40* 

" Ashley 473 

" St. Philip 437 

il Wentworth... 370 

" Rutledge 2.350 

" Drake 075 



Meeting " King 450 



Hanover. 
Broad . . . 
Broad. . . , 
America . 
Spring . 



America 450 

Spring 5.787 

Tradd 974 

Drake 480 

Line 869 



Meeting and East Bay 



946 



STREETS GRADED. 

For which levels were taken, profiles furnished and grade pegs 
Carolina Street from Rutledge to King 



Cleveland Street. 



Coming Street. . . 
Fishburne Street. 
Perry Street 
Sheppard Street. . 
St. Philip Street.. 

Sumter 

Tracy Street 



Rutledge to westward and 
approaches to Hampton Park 

Sheppard northward 

Rutledge. . .to King 



u Sheppard. 

" Rutledge.. 

" Sheppard . 

" Rutledge.. 

" Sheppard . 

STREETS EXTENDED. 



Sumter. . . . 

Tracy 

Carolina.. . 

King 

northward. 



set ; 

1,612 

1,944 
1,063 
,1,710 

..873 
. 771 
. 583 
1,492 
1,050 



fee 

feet 



Cleveland Street from Rutledge to Ashley. 

G idsden Street from Halsey's Mill Gate to Calhoun. 

Bennett Street from Ashley to Gadsden Street extended. 



City Surveyor's Report. 57 



STREET LTNES LOCATED. 

Alexander Street, 8. W. Cor. Chapel. 

Ashley Avenue, between Broad and Tradd. 

Ashley Avenue, E. S. between Huger and Moultrie. 

Ashley Avenue, center line between Bull and Calhoun. 

Ashley Avenue N. W Cor. Kennedy. 

Ashley Avenue between Mount and Congress. 

Bull Street N. S. between Rutledge and Smith. 

Chapel Street S. S. between Alexander and Elizabeth. 

Cleveland Street both sides Ashley to Rutledge. 

Cleveland Street S. S. from King to Rutledge. 

Cleveland Street S. W. Cor. King. 

Cleveland Street S. W. Cor. Tracy. 

Drake Street N. E. Cor. Cooper. 

Fishburne Street S. S. between Rutledge and Ashley. 

Francis Street S. S. from King to Rutledge. 

Francis Street N. W. Cor, Tracy. 

Hanover Street N. E. Cor. Center, 

Huger Street N. S. between King and Rutledge. 

Huger Street N. S. from Rutledge to Ashley. 

King Street W. S. from Francis to Maverick. 

King Street N. W. Cor. Moultrie. 

King Street S. W. Cor. Maverick. 

King Street N. W. Cor. Maverick. 

King Street N. W. Cor. Cleveland. 

King Street N. W. Cor. Francis. 

King Street S W. Cor. Francis. 

Legare Street W. S. between Tradd and Gibbs. 

Line Street K E. Cor. Ashley. 

Line Street S. E. Cor. Ashley. 

Maverick Street S. S. from King to Rutledge. 

Maverick Street N. W. Cor. Tracy. 

Meeting Street E. S. from City boundary to Willimau. 

Meeting Street between Queen and Horlbeck. 

Meeting Street E. S. Lee to Williman. 

Moultrie Street S. S. from Ashley to Rutledge. 

Moultrie Street S. S. between King and Rutledge. 

Nassau Street cor. Hill. 

Radclifte Street S. S. between King and St. Philip. 

Rutledge Avenue W. S. from Huger to Moultrie. 

Rutledge Avenue E. S. from Grove to Moultrie. 

Rutledge Avenue S. E. Cor. Cleveland. 

Rutledge Avenue N. E. Cor. Francis. 

Rutledge Avenue S. E. Cor. Francis. 

Rutledge Avenue N. W. Cor. Fishburne. 

Rutledge Avenue N. E. Cor. Maverick. 



58 



Mayor Smyth's Annual Review 



Rutledge Avenue S. E. Cor. Maverick. 

ftutledge A \ emir N. E. Cor. Moultrie. 

St Philip Street E. S. between Radcliffe and Warren, 

SL Philip Street N. W. Cor. Vanderhorst. 

Tradd Street N. S. between Rutledge and Ashley. 

Tracy Street S W. Cor. Francis. 



MEASUREMENTS— ROADWAYS. 

( FOE ESTIMATES.) 

Ashley Avenue. . . from Bull to Calhoun 3 984 sq. 

Calhoun Street E. A: W. of Alexander ) „ . Q tl 

Alexander Street N. & S. of Calhoun J 

Calhoun Street from Meeting ... to llutledge 10,738 " 

Cooper Street " Bay "Meeting 6,130 " 

Franklin Street " Broad " Queen 1,907 " 

George Street " Anson " Meeting 1,387 " 

Hampstead, East and North of Mall 1,331 " 

Hasell Street from King to Meeting 



yds 



King Street ' 

Line Street ' 

Line Street. ' 

Morris Street ' 

Pitt Street ' 

Radcliffe Street. ... ' 

Reid Street " 

Rutledge Avenue. . ' 

Savage Street " 

South Street " 

St. Philip Street. . " 

Water Street " 



Ladson. . 
King.. . 
Meeting. 
King.. . 
Beaufain 
King.. . 
Hanover. 
Broad. . . . 

Broad 

America . 



1,995 
1,816 
1,233 
2,791 
1,670 



Line " Spring 

Meeting.. . " East Bay. . 



Tradd 

St. Philip 

Aiken 

St. Philip 

Calhoun 7,343 

Rutledge 11,380 

Drake 2,785 

Spring 26,614 

Tradd 2,338 

Drake 1,336 

.... 3,434 
.... 2,353 



MEASUREMENTS— ROADWAYS. 

(finished woek.) 

Alexander Street from Calhoun, northward j 

Calhoun Street from Alexander to East Bay. ... > 1,116 sq. yds 

East Bay Street fiom Calhoun Southward * 

Ashley Ave. from Bull to Calhoun. . .Bituminous Macadam. 2, 408 sq. yds 
George Street from Anson to Meeting. .Vitrified Brick. ..... .1,366 

King Street from Ladson to Tradd Granite Blocks 1,741 

Pitt St. from Beaufain to Wentworth. .Bituminous Macadam. .877 
Reid Street from King to Meeting. ..." 1 ,:'><>(> 

South Street from America to Drake. " " 1,056 



City Surveyor's Report. 



59 



MEASUREMENTS— CURBS. 



Coming Street. . . E. S. 

John Street N. 8. 

Meeting Street... W. S. 
Morris Street.. . .N. S. 

Morris Street S. S. 

Radcliffe Street... S. S. 

Smith Street E. S. 

Smith Street.... W. S. 



(for estimates.) 

from Vanderhorst to Warren 809 feet 

" Meeting. ... '• Elizabeth 565 " 

" Queen " Southward 116 " 



Coming 
Coming . 
King.... 
Calhoun 
Calhoun. 



Rutledge 1,297 

Rutledge 1,300 

Thomas 1,542 

Radcliffe 1,314 

Radcliffe 1,313 



Warren Street S. S. " Coming 



Thomas. 



607 



MEASUREMENTS— SIDEWALKS. 

(for estimates.) 



Alexander Street 


..W. S. 


. . from Calhoun . . . 


. to Northward . 


. 607 


America Street . . 


.E. S., 


, . * ' Hampden . 


. " Mary.. , 


. 8,294 


Ashley Avenue . . 


.E. S.. 


. " Bull 


. ' ' Calhoun 


. 6,504 


Ashley Avenue . . 


.W. S, 


,. " Bull 


. " Calhoun 


. 7,218 


Beaufain Street. . 


.N. S., 


, . " Archdale. . . 


. " Pitt 


. 6,045 


Bull Street 


..s. s., 


, . " Coming.... 


. " Pitt 


. 3,226 


Calhoun Street. . 


. .N. S. 


" Alexander. 


. " Westward. . 


. 923 


Calhoun Street.. 


..s. s.. 


. " East Bay.. 


. " Washington. 


. 2,322 


Calhoun Street. . 


..Both, 


" Smith 


. ' ' Rutledge . . . 


. 8,500 


Chalmers Street. . 


.N. S.. 


. " Church 


. " Eastward. . . 


. 1,799 


Charlotte Street. , 


,.s. s.. 


. " Alexander. . 


. •' Washington 


. 6,450 


Church Street . . , 


. .E. S.. 


. " Broad 


. " Water 


. 8,383 


Cooper Street. . . 


..N. S. 


. " Meeting 


. ' ' Hanover . . . 


. 3,420 


Cooper Street 


..Both. 


. •' Aiken 


. " America. . . . 


. 2.880 


George Street 


.N. S. 


. ' ' Coming .... 


" King 


. 4,345 


Hasell Street 


.8. s.. 


.front of Trinity Church 


. 827 


John Street , 


,.N. S. 


.from Elizabeth... 


. to Westward. . 


. 2,359 


King Street 


.Both., 


, " Tradd 


. " Ladson 


. 4,800 


Laurens Street . . 


,.N. S. 


. " East Bay... 


. " Wharf 


4,698 


Legare Street .... 


.E. S. 


between South Bay and Tradd 


. 4,618 


Legare Street 


.E. S.. 


from Tradd 


. to Northward. 


. 1,015 


Logan Street... . 


..w. s. 


" Queen 


. ' ' Broad 


. 2,587 


Montague Street , 


,.N. S. 


. ' ' Rutledge. . . . 


. " Pitt 


. 6,036 


Morris Street. . . . 


.8. S... 


" King 


. " St, Philip... 


2.400 


Pitt Street 


t E. S.. 


. " Beaufain 


. " Went worth. 


. 2,450 


Pitt Street 


,E. 8.., 


, ' ' Montague. . . 


. " Bull 


. 1,400 


Pitt Street 


.W. S.. 


' ' Montague. . . 


. to Wentworth. 


. 1,050 


Pitt Street 


.W. s.. 


" Bull 


. " Calhoun 


. 2,100 


Radcliffe Street. , 


..S.S.. 


' ' King 


. " Coming 


. 2,450 


Rutledge Avenue. E. S. . 


" Broad 


. '■' Montague . . 


.10,000 


Rutledge Avenue 


i.E. S.. 


" Bennett 


. " Calhoun 


. 2,000 



sq. ft. 



60 Mayor Smyth 's Annual Review. 

Rutledge Avenue. W S. from Broad to Queen 8,600 sq, 

Rutledge Avenue. W. S. " Beaufain " Montague 2,800 " 

Rutledge Avenue. W. S. " Bennetl " Calhoun 2,000 " 

Rutledge Avenue. E. S.. " Calhoun " Radcliffe 4,800 " 

Rutledge Avenue. E. S. . " Broad 'Southward.. 1,385-' 

Rutledge Avenue E. S. between Calhoun and Vanderhorst. . . 8,057 " 

Rutledge Avenue W.S..from Spring to Line 7,0(54 " 

Savage Streel E. B. . " Tradd " Northward... 4,617 " 

Savage Streel E. 8.. " Broad "Tradd 6,602 " 

Savage Street W.S.. " Broad " Tradd G 428 " 

Smith Street W.S. . " Wentworth. . " Bull 5,024" 

Spring Street N. S. . " Coming " Rutledge 8 108 '* 

St. Philip Street.. E. S... " Vanderhorst. " Radclifife.... 2,528 " 

Tradd Street S. S. .Between Legare and Greenhill 1,939 " 

Vanderhorst St. . .S. S. . .from St. Philip. . . to Coming 2.033 " 

Warren Street.... N. S.. " St. Philip... " Smith 11,310 " 

Water Street S. S. . " Meeting " East Bay 7.200 " 

Wentworth Street.. S.S.. " Ashley " Rutledge 3.102 " 

Wentworth Street. .N. S. " Smith « Rutledge 3,619 " 

Woolfe Street N. S. " King "Meeting 4 907" 



City Surveyor's Report. 



01 



MEASUREMENTS— FINISHED WORK. 

Curbs, Sidewalks and Gateways. 







3d 
w 

E 
W 

N 
S 
N 
N 
S 
E 
E 
W 
s 

E 

N 

N 

E 

E 

W 

W 

N 

E 

S 

E 

E 

W 

W 

E 

E 

W 

N 

N 

E 

S 

s 

N 

s 

N 

N 


From 


To 




■4J 

o> 

td 1> 

a 


601 

80 


a 

3-i . 

2540 

723 

'746 


be 
P 

> • 

X ** 

id C7 1 
Orj) 

262 


<x>'Jj 
u 

u 

2640 

2850 
2773 
890 
1671 
2063 
3738 

'827 

3636 
858 

4177 
906 

2386 

1924 
381 

1433 

3014 
1813 
1837 
778 
1972 
2258 
2635 
1482 
2104 
1197 
1688 
3863 
2818 
1602 
2372 


Brick 
Gates 


Concrete 
Gates 


STREET 


c 
6 
% 

8 
4 

6 

7 

'2 


718 
257 

365 

422 

"96 






5 

"*2 

7 
4 

'4 
1 

8 
2 
5 

'3 

'4 
1 
7 
8 
5 
5 
6 
4 
3 
8 
1 
5 

21 
3 
6 
2 




Alexander] 






1033 
197 

ios 




East Bay., j 
America.... 
America v .. 

Ashley 

Beaufain.... 

Bull 

Calhoun.. .. 


South .... 

South 

Wentworth. 
Archdale... . 

Coming: 

Alexander . 

Church 

Alexander . 

Broad 

Broad 

Broad 

M'd'n Lane. 
bet. Hasell.. 
East Bay. .. 

Concord 

bet. Tradd.. 

Lamboll 

Broad 

Court H. Sq 
bet Ashley. 

Calhoun 

America 

Broad 

bet Calhoun 
Spring .... 

Bogard 

bet. Broad., 
bet. Broad.. 
Montague .. 

Coming 

Laurel 

Vanderh'rst 
bet. Legare. 
St. Philip... 
St. Khilip... 
Rutledge — 

King 

Meeting 


Reid 

Amherst.. .. 
Montague... 

Coming 

Pitt 

Westward . . 


'356 

382 














166 


Charlotte,.. . 


Washington 

Tradd 

Northward . 
Northward . 
Eastward... 
& Wentw'h. 

Concord 

Wharf 

& Lamboll.. 
southward . 










596 


Church 

Franklin.... 
Franklin — 

Hasell 

King 

Laurens 

Laurens 

Legare 


*261 
484 

'12 


*379 
170 


7 
'l88 


2868 
3338 


211 

188 
34 

410 
91 


Logan. 

Meeting 

Montague. .. 

Oyier 

Reid 

Rutledge . .. 
Rutledge.. . 








218 


Northward.. 
& Rutledge. 
Northward . 
Westward . . 
Southward . 
& Vand'h'st 
Bogard 


"44 


*204 


*228 


943 


252 
2i9 










75 


Rutledge 

Hutledpe. .. 
Savage 








401 


Line. 

& Tradd 




513 

270 


savage 

Smith . 


& Tra d 

Bull. 










267 
337 


Spring 

Spring 

St. Philip... 

Tradd 

"Vanderhorst 


Laurel 

Rose Lane 
Radcliffe.... 










231 
166 










470 


&Greenhill. 
Coming 










76 
250 


Warren . 


Thomas . . . 










1383 


Wentworth. 


Ashley 










273 


Woolfe 

Woolfe... 


Sou. R. R... 
Sou. R. R... 










331 
124 

















MEASUREMENTS— CRUSHED ROCK. 

31 Car loads 760 cubic yards 

SPECIAL SURVEYS. 

Ashley Avenue, Bull Bennett, Calhoun and Gadsden for extensions. 

Ashley Avenue between Line and Kennedy for widening. 

Bay Street from Amherst to Reid. 

Columbus Concord, Chapel and Bay, low lands. 

Bay and Chapel Street railway tracks. 

Francis, Rutledge, Moultrie and King, Street lines. 

Meeting from Court House Square northward— sidewalk improvement. 

St. Philip corner Vanderhorst — Upper Market lot. 



62 Mayor Smyth's Annual Review. 

SPECIAL WORK. 
( Ihicora Park. 

Design and Construction of Trestle and Bridge. 

Laying out Railroad Avenue profiling, cross-sectioning and moving earth. 
Maintenance of Nursery for trees and plants. 
Superintendence of Water Works Plant, Drainage, Roads etc. 
Property lines and encroachments on same. 

Hampton Park. 

Plat of Park (Library Section). 

Plans for Station. 

Levels for Grading. 

Lines for Roadways. * 

MISCELLANEOUS. 
Indexing. 

Examination of Plats and Records. 
Blue Printing. 

Levels etc., for Art Building. 
Examination of grand stand at Base ball Park. 

Cement Testing-8 brands cement.. . ) TM number briquetteg broken _ 325 
1 brand lime ) 

CARE OF STREET SIGNS. 

Under ordinance ratified November 25th, 1902 the care of street signs 
was placed with this department. The following is a Report of the work 
done : 

Number of General Inspections 2 

Number of Signs repaired 49 

Amount expended $21.15 

Extra signs on hand 438 

House numbers on hand 2809 

INFORMATION CONCERNING THE CITY. 

Area, high land 3.76 square miles 

Marsh and mud flats 1 36 " 

Total 5.12 " 

Streets : 

Material for roadway. 

Asphalt 73 miles 

Granite Blocks 17.11 " 

Clay Gravel 6.87 " 

McAdam 4.09 " 

Shell 1.62 " 

Pyrites cinders 32 " 

Cobble stones 3 74 " 

Vitrified brick 38 " 

Unimproved 33.59 " 

Total length of streets, exclusive of lanes and alleys 68.45 •* 



City Surveyor's Report. 63 



Public Parks 



Chicora Park 318.1 Acres 

Colonial Lake (including pond) 9.29 " 

White Point Gardens 6 88 " 

Marion Square 5.78 ' 

Hampstead Mall 3.67 

Cannon Park (including Auditorium) 2.85 " 

Wragg Mall 1.23 " 

Wragg Square .89 " 

Washington Park 94 " 

Lucas St. Park. 50 " 

Market St. Park 30 " 

Keystone Park .10 " 

Hampton Park about 317.00 " 

Drains: (Brick.) 

Tidal drains (3 ft. 6 in. by 5 it. 9 in.) 5.51 miles 

Other * brick drains with sectional area of from 0.5 sq.ft. to 

9sq. ft 18.03 ' 

Vitrified Pipe : 

24 inch 0.09 miles 12 inch 19.82 miles 

18 inch 3.45 « 10 inch 2.15 " 

15inch 3.25 « 8 inch 2.34 " 

ELECTRIC STREET RAILWAYS. 

Double track 10 45 miles 

Single track 1.90 " 

Total mileage (10.45 multiplied by 2) plus 1.90 22.80 " 



J. H. DINGLE, 

City Surveyor. 



<>1 Mayor Smyth's Annual Review. 

CITY ELECTRICIAN'S REPOR 



To the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of Charleston: 

Gentlemen I beg leave to submil for your consideration 
in\ eighth Annual Report for the year L903: 

REPORT. 

Eighteen permits were issued and two hundred and thirty- 
five poles set by the Soul hern Bell Telephone and Telegraph 
Company during the year L903. 

Eight permits were issued and thirty-nine poles set by the 
Gordon Telephone Company during the year L903. 

Eleven permits were issued and forty-six poles set by the 
Charleston Consolidated Railway, Gas and Electric Com- 
pany during the year 1903. 

One permit was issued and one pole set by the Western 
Union Telegraph Company during the year 1903. 

One permit was issued and one pole set by the Postal Tele 
graph Company during the year 1903. 

MUNICIPAL INSPECTION. 

I have commenced the fifth year of municipal inspection of 
wiring. I have during the year issued 485 permits to do elec- 
trical construction, including old and new installations; is- 
sued 465 certificates, covering 2,420 incandescent lights, 9 
alternation arc lights, 447 fans, 28 motors (equivalent to 
10fvJ4 horse power). 

The Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company have 
completed their underground system, and have moved all of 
the old poles and wires from the streets named in section 5 
of the underground ordinance, except the poles that are used 
by the city for the use of the Fire and Police Telegranh wires. 

The police alarm system has given perfect satisfaction dur- 
ing the year 1903. 

There was added to the system on May 2nd, 1903, one addi- 
tional box No. 36 at Hampton Park, and one additional box 




Ton Simons, 
City Electrician. 



City Electrician's Report. 65 

No. 52, at the corner of Carolina and Coming Streets. The 
Sumter Telephone instruments have given perfect satisfac- 
tion during the year. The purchase of these instruments has 
saved the city about two hundred and fifty dollars. 

This year the repairs on the telephones amounted to 
eighteen dollars and seventy-two cents. 

The cost of running the police system during the year 1903 
is as follows: 

Supplies $185 94 

Labor 312 00 

Total expenses $497 94 

Appropriation $500 00 

Expenses 497 94 

Balance on hand $ 2 06 

Calls received over the system during the year: 

Telephone calls 89,888 

Wagon calls 1,688 

Total.. 91,576 

Very respectfully, 

PON SIMONS. 
City Electrician. 



66 Mayor Smyth's Annual "Review. 

To tin Mayor and Aldermen of flic City of Charleston: 

Gentlemen — I beg leave to submit for your consideration 
my report on the lighting of the streets of the City of Char- 
leston, S. C. 

REPORT. 

The streets of the city are now lighted by 175 arc lights, 
1,200 normal candle power; 400 gas lights, 60 candle power; 
nil* carbon lights, 60 normal candle power; 30 Kitson lights, 
1,200 normal candle power. 

175 arc lights $16,715 43 

Deduction per Police reports 97 84 

Amount paid for year $1(5,017 59 

•100 gas lights $ 9,352 83 

Deduction per Police reports 45 9G 

Amount paid for year $' 9,306 87 

102 carbon lights $2,62140 

Deduction per Police report 24 21 

Amount paid for year $ 2,597 19 

30 Kitson lights $ 2s,70O 00 

Deduct ion per Police reports 51 98 

Amount paid for year $ 2,648 02 

Miscellaneous bills for moving lamps, etc 373 13 

Total amount expended for lighting the city $31,542 80 

During the month of March there were seven (7) arc lights 
put into service and five (5) during the month of April, this 
making 175 arc lights in the service- 
Very respectfully submitted, 

TON SIMONS. 
City Electrician and Superintendent of Street Lighting. 




f 








J. Merceir Green, M. D., 
Health Officer. 



Department of Health. 67 



REPORT OF HEALTH OFFICER FOR 1903. 



City op Charleston, S. C, 
Department of Health, January 1st, 1904. 

To the Honorable the Mayor and Aldermen: 

Gentlemen — I have the honor to submit this, my annual 
report, with the Meteorological Observations and table of 
vital statistics, and such proceedings connected with this 
department which have been undertaken for the benefit of 
the city during the year just passed. 

It is a source of great gratification for me to again report 
that the general health of the city has been good and pre- 
vailing diseases too, have been of a mild type. 

Diseases of a contagious nature have been less, with the 
exception of small-pox and diphtheria, and on the whole there 
has been a lessened mortality than for some years. 

Whether this is due to increased efforts on the part of our 
department or not cannot of course be said, but I can con- 
scientiously say and feel that we have earnestly endeavored 
to do our duty in the interest of the community. 

One thing which seems quite evident is the lack of certain 
ordinances which should give us power and authority to act 
in matters which pertain to the public welfare. Working 
with this idea in view, I have drawn up and submitted a set 
of ordinances which will be more effective and which will 
give us authority to act and punish before Recorder's Court 
any violators against the rules and regulations of the Board 
of Health, fines or imprisonment being the penalties. 

To establish our department upon a high plane means 
much; that is, the people must be taught that the laws of 
health must be recognized and obeyed. 

And now that we are assured of a good and plentiful 
supply of water, I am of the opinion that typhoid fever will 
certainly decrease; but at the same time, there are certain 
conditions which must be required of property holders, and 
that is, connections should be made with the mains, so as to 



,;s Mayor Smyth's Annual Review. 

have each and every house in the city provided with this 
water; next, all cisterns which are not built above, ground 
should be condemned and done awa\ with, and all wells, a 
great many of which are stil) in Charleston, filled up. Con- 
taminated cisterns and well water is undoubtedly respon- 
sible for our cases of typhoid fever, and it should not be 
permitted, being always a menace and a souce of infection 
in this form of fever. 

Next should come our sewerage system with the filling up 
and abolishment of all privy vaults and cess-pools. 1 have 
said so much about this in my last two annual reports that 
there is hardly any need this year to again go into detail and 
show the absolute necessity lor the construction of this all- 
important requisite in our city. Charleston must have a 
system, and the sooner the better, for we are as dependent 
upon this for our future prosperity, as much, or I should 
say. more so, than anything else which has been brought to 
our attention in the last fifty years. 

Sanitary conditions, mortality, and the general health or 
places are the first thing inquired into by investors, capi- 
talists and promoters. Frequently there comes to my office 
requests for the health reports of the city, for people look 
into these questions far more than is generally thought. If 
we can show them that we have a plentiful supply of water, 
a good sewerage system, I can assure you that it will add 
greatly to our chances of success. 

And now, as regards the inspection and examination of 
food stuffs. Milk, meat, including meats of all kinds, salt 
and fresh, fish, vegetables, fruits, should all be examined and 
confiscated, when found not suitable for food. For cattle 
slaughtered for our market, there should be one central abat- 
toir, where the cattle should be systematically and scien- 
tifically examined before and after being killed. Milk brought 
into the city or found, in the city should be examined and 
when found adulterated, confiscated, and party or parties 
dealt with accordingly. Dairies where milk is sold should be 
inspected, to see that they are kept clean and sweet. Milk 
is such a common article of food and used so extensively for 
infants, that the most stringent safeguards should be placed 
around its production, distribution and consumption. 



Department of Health. 69 

It should be made a crime for any unwholesome food or 
any article of diet to be exposed and offered for sale. Other 
cities are very strict about these matters and unhesitatingly 
condemn and confiscate, besides summoning before Re- 
corder's Court, where a tine or imprisonment is imposed. 
Feed, defined by Dr. Atwater as follows : "Food is that 
which, when taken into the body, builds up its tissues and 
keeps them in repair, or which is consumed in the body to 
jield energy in the form of heat to keep it warm and create 
strength for its work." From this we must see that a phis- 
iologic law demands that all food taken into the body should 
be pure and unadulterated, free from any disease or putre- 
factive changes, because of the dangers that arise from im- 
proper food materials, and their injurious effects on the 
animal economy. 

Diseases which render cattle unfit for food are, epidemic 
pi euro-pneumonia, foot and mouth disease, Texas fever, rin- 
derpest, anthrax, actinomycosis and tuberculosis, dropsical 
and inflammatory conditions; in the hog Ave have, anthrax, 
inn co-enteritis, hog-cholera, tuberculosis, cystericus cellu- 
losa, measles, and trichina, 

All large cities having abattoirs, where cattle are slaugh- 
tered, both for home and foreign consumption, are under the 
supervision of an inspector appointed by the government. 

Inspection in all cities should be made, and every safe- 
guard should be thrown around the health and welfare of 
our citizens, and every means adopted against the ill-effects 
which might arise from improper and diseased food stuffs 
which might be thrown upon the market. 

The dealers themselves are ignorant of diseased and adul- 
terated food, and I am sure would heartily support any 
measure tending to the correction of this evil, when it ex- 
ists. 

Referring to the matter of garbage and its removal, while 
the present system is adequate, I do not think it perfectly 
satisfactory, for several reasons : Viz., the carts are not suit- 
able, and the colored drivers are too careless in handling it. 
tli ere are too often carts reeking with decomposing material 
passing through our streets, which is easily prevented by 



7<> Mayor Smyth's Annual Review. 

tlic city furnishing proper and suitably covered wagons 
which do no1 permit of exposure or einil any odor. Eacli 
household should have proper and suitably covered recep- 
tacles for i he deposition of its garbage, which should be 
kept closed and covered, and the contents carefully removed 
to the garbage wagon. 

Cremation should be its final means of disposal. T hope 
to see the day when all of our garbage is treated in this 
manner. 

Many needed reforms in sanitary conditions in our city 
should be looked after, to which I have called especial at- 
tention to in another part of my report. 

As to the need of a plumbing inspector, it appears to me 
all the more necessary now, since we are about to introduce 
our new water supply. 

As regards the medical inspection of schools, which I 
recommended last year, 1 can only reiterate what I have 
said, and in addition more strongly urge that this be car- 
ried into effect, for T am of the opinion, judging from re- 
sults elsewhere, that it will accomplish a great deal, and 
protect many who are innocently exposed. 

I am glad to say that it has been possible to control small- 
pox, without extra appropriation from the city, there too 
having been a greater number of cases than for many years 
previous, but with very little mortality. 

Having personally inspected a great many of the low lots 
in the city, I find it impossible to have same filled (the law 
in regard to same does not allow this department to have 
lots filled, where owners refuse after notice, except at its 
own expense, which must afterwards be collected before a 
court), as it would use up all of our appropriation, so they 
have remained and nothing done to them. All low lots 
ought to be tilled up and drained and not allowed to remain 
accumulating with water which soon becomes stagnant and 
a breeding place for mosquitoes. 

In the revision of the ordinances, I prepared an ordinance 
to the effect, ''that all places must be filled in and drained 
before any house or houses are built upon said lot." This, 
I think will be very advantageous and will, if carried into 



Department of Health. 71 

effect, be the means of improving the sanitary conditions in 
this respect. 

During my term of office I have earnestly looked into the 
many problems which confront the sanatarian, each requir- 
ing a special study, both from a practical and an economical 
standpoint. Although I must admit that it is "poor econo- 
my" to allow the matter of money to stand in the way, when 
the health of a community demands it, still at the same time, 
it has to be considered, and we must deprive ourselves of 
needed reforms for lack of this. 

There is certainly a need of a milk and food inspector, 
and as the water supply is about to be furnished, of a plumb- 
ing inspector; the establishment of a modern abattoir; col- 
lection of all garbage and refuse, by means of sanitary wag- 
ons; crematory for the burning of this refuse; proper and 
suitable means for the removal of night-soil, etc. 

All of these I most heartily endorse and recommend to 
your most honorable body, believing that they will be of ma- 
terial benefit to the sanitary conditions and welfare of our 
city. 

As health officer, I attended the meeting of the American 
Public Health Association, held in Washington, October 
26-30th. Attendance upon these meetings is both interest- 
ing and instructive, and an exchange of ideas is had with 
the most prominent men in sanitary affairs, from all over 
the country. The mosquito was accepted as being the factor 
in the spread of yellow fever, many papers being read bear- 
ing upon this point, municipal sanitation, disposal of garb- 
age and city refuse. 

CONTAGIOUS DISEASES. 
SMALL-POX. 

Last year there were reported 49 cases, with but 2 deaths. 

This year we have had reported a much larger number 
than for many years previous, there being in all 136 cases, 
7 white, 129 colored. There have been deaths, colored, 9; 
white, 0. 



7_' Mayor Smyth's Annual Review. 

This number of cases should not be surprising, as we 
have been actually surrounded by it. The greater number 
of cases being imported and were, so to speak, dumped upon 
the city. These cases had, of course, to be cared for so as 
not to endanger the lives of our citizens, consequently were 
immediately removed to the pest house. 

It seemed to 'some quite strange that the city did not 
adopt some means of protection against the introduction 
of these cases. 

Quarantine is really impracticable under the circum- 
stances, as it is impossible to diagnose a case until the erup- 
tion appears. Not only this but it is also impossible to 
guard Q\vvy point of ingress, as the ease would walk in or 
come in row boats, making any landing along the whole 
line of both river fronts, and develop two or three days 
after arrival. 

There have been but four cases among the whites, these 
coming from actual contact, in the case of a child, who 
played with another child who had it in a mild form, about 
three miles from the city. 

The death rate has been light, 7 deaths having occurred. 
Again I have been able to keep expenses at a minimum. 

Out of the appropriation for our annual expenses, the 
Board of Health, in July, appropriated the sum of three 
hundred and fifty dollars, to the Board of Hospital Com 
missioners, for the removal of smallpox cases to the pest 
house. This, of course, will necessarily increase the ex- 
penses incurred in the management of the pest house. 

All cases have been treated by myself, and in the manage- 
ment of its affairs, I think I have been as economical as 
possible. I have managed to run it without calling on the 
city for money beyond that which was appropriated for our 
annual expenses. 

Removal of cases with thorough fumigation and vaccina- 
tion was always practiced, anol every precaution taken. 

SCARLET FEVER. 

Scarlet fever has been decidedly less prevalent than last 
year, there being reported in all but 20 cases; white, 19; col- 
ored, 1. Deaths from this disease were 1 white, colored. 



Department of Health. 73 

DIPHTHERIA AND MEMBRANOUS CROUP. 

Classing these two diseases as the same there have been 
reported during the year 27 eases, being of a mild type, 
white, 25, colored, 2. Deaths 2 white, colored, 0. 

In all, 49 cultures were examined by the bacteriologist 
for the diagnosis of these diseases, with 12 positive results. 

TYPHOID FEVER. 

With this we include in this report typhoid fever, al- 
though, of course, it must not be classed as a disease of this 
nature. Typhoid fever, though again prevalent, has been 
less than for some years previous, there have been reported 
146 cases; white, 79; colored, 67. Deaths, 14 white, 21 col- 
ored. Total, 35. 

I feel confident that upon the adoption of our new water 
supply, and the establishment of a system of sewerage with 
the filling up of all vaults and cess-pools together with the 
condemnation of cisterns and wells, that it will be the means 
of greatly lessening our typhoid cases, and in time free our 
city from this disease. 

TUBERCULOSIS. 

As usual, the greatest number of deaths have occurred 
from consumption, a disease which is perfectly preventable, 
and whose mortality could be greatly lessened by proper 
preventive measures. 

I have noticed in my readings upon this subject that the 
mortality rate from this disease has, in the last ten years, 
constantly and steadily decreased in the United States. 

This should indeed encourage, us and spur us on to the 
exercise of every means known to science in regard to its 
spread and prevention. 

That the sputum contains the infective bacilli, and that 
a patient affected, expectorates millions of these bacilli in 
the twenty-four hours which after drying are blown about 
and carried promiscuously, is a fact startling but true. That 
any person breathing this dry and powdered sputum into 
his lungs, can thereby become infected with consumption, is 



7 1 Mayor Smyth's Animal Review. 

certainly worth our best endeavors in trying to educate the 
people as to its dangers and the use of all precautions tor 
its control. 

National, State and municipal sanitoria for its isolation 
and propel- care and treatmenl arc constantly being urged by 
sanitarians and physicians all over the country. 

There were 212 deaths from tuberculosis in L903, 52 white, 
100 colored. 

MORTALITY. 

The general death rate in Charleston was less than for 
11)02, being less among both white and colored. Our death 
fate in 1899, which was then based on a population of 05,- 
167, was 27.00 per 1,000. 

*In 1903 based on a population of 55,807 (9,300 less), is 
20.28 per 1,000. 

Our estimated census of 05,167, which is much nearer 
correct than the official census of 55,807, would give us a 
mortality of 22.50 per 1,000. 

Population (Official.) Proportion of Deaths. 

Write 24,285 White 1 in 5? 

Black and Colored 31.522 Black and Colored 1 in 32 



Total 55,807 

Ratio per 1.000, White 17.50 

Ratio per 1,000, Black and Colored 32.99 

Number of deaths among white race 426 

Number of deaths among black and colored race 1,047 

Total 1,467 

Accidents and still-births excluded. 

•Our official census in 1890 was 65,165. In 1900 it only 
gives us an official census of 55,807, a falling off of 9,360. 
This last census, although official, I think incorrect, it hav- 
ing been taken in summer, the time of year when the great- 
er portion of our white population are out of the city, on 
their summer vacation. In my opinion, I regard the cen- 
sus of 1890 (65,167), as being nearer correct than that of 
1900 (55,807). 



Department of Health . 75 

QUARANTINE AT FORT JOHNSON. 

Active interest is always maintained by the committee in 
charge of the affairs at quarantine. Though we follow close- 
ly tne rules and regulations of the public health and marine 
hospital service, we allow all the lattitude that these regu- 
lations give us in admitting foreign vessels to our port. 

Our regulations are strictly carried out, but in no where 
interferes or obstructs our trade relations with other ports. 
The committee consisting of Mr, Hall T. McGee, chairman, 
A. S. Smith, W. P. Carrington and Drs. Charles W. Kollock 
and J. M. Green, have been most assiduous in the discharge 
of its duties. Dr. Robert Lebby, quarantine officer, has been 
faithful and untiring in his duties and ever on the watch in 
protecting the city from importation of disease from for- 
eign lands. 

There have been 109 arrivals at the quarantine station 
during the year. 

Steamships 80 Brigs 3 

Barques 9 Cruisers 2 

Schooners 10 Sloops 1 

Schooner Yachts 4 x 

Arriving from the following ports : 

Germany 18 South America 6 

Portugal 3 Central America 10 

Spain 13 Coastwise 12 

Great Britain 3 Arrivals in 1903 109 

West Indies 38 Arrivals in 1902 182 

Chile 6 

SANITARY INSPECTORS. 

The city being divided into four sanitary districts, one is 
appointed each year as inspector of his respective district. 
The inspection of fifty premises a day is required, with sig- 
natures of parties occupying said premises. These men 
work faithfully and efficiently and have very large areas to 
cover. 

Unfortunately there seems to be a lack of power in our 
city ordinances, clothing them with authority enough, to 



76 Mayor Smyth's Animal Review, 

compel owners and residents to clean up, when ordered. In- 
stances have occurred where parties refusing to clean up 
and remove accumulations of dirt and filth have been sum- 
moned before recorders' courl and dismissed. 

We must have the help of the courts in these matters, and 
with that in view, I have drawn up some ordinances, which, 
if passed, will, I think he much more effectual. 

The following appointments were made for L903: 

Sanitary District No. 1 — Gilman Courtenay. 

Sanitary Dstrict No. 2 A. \Y. Mitchell. 
Sanitary District \'<>. :5 Mike Hogan. 

Sanitary District No. 4 D. P. Johnson. 

DISINFECTION AND FUMIGATION. 

There was as usual an active distribution of disinfect- 
ants, for six or eight months during the year, chloride lime, 
etc-, solution chloride lime and copperas being sent through 
the streets and to all places requesting it. A preparation 
known as phinotas (crude) is also supplied where it is nec- 
essary, and premises fumigated with formaldehyde. 

There have been many places, where people died of con 
sumption, fumigated, which is certainly a step in the right 
direction. The contagiousness of tuberculosis coming as we 
believe chiefly from the sputum, disinfection of apartments 
where such patients have died is requisite for the. prevention 
of its further spread. 

That tuberculosis taken in hand early can be cured is 
recognized by all physicians and sanitarians. 

In every household means should be advised for disinfect- 
ing the discharges of those afflicted with tuberculosis, and 
the patient himself taught, that, by these means, he will 
prevent some other person from contracting it. After death 
from this disease all rooms and effects should be thoroughly 
disinfected and fumigated. 

Mr. Francis Nipson is in charge of this department, and 
has been so for many years, serving the city faithfully and 
efficiently. 

Mr. Meade, who has had charge of our station for disin- 
fecting material, died in July, Mr. C. Adams being appoint- 
ed in his place. 



Department of Health. 77 



REMOVAL OF GARBAGE. 

This very important work is done by the city, under the 
care and control of the street department, and is managed 
well. But there are many objections to the removal of garb- 
age and refuse as this department is now compelled to do, 
They should be furnished with carts suitable for the pur- 
pose, covered so as not to expose contents or emit any odor 
or otherwise be a nuisance when hauling this effete material. 

The drivers or collectors should be competent and be- 
sides, instructed in the care and removal of all refuse, and 
be carefully watched in order that this work should be 
properly and effectually done. 

People should be compelled to have proper and suitable 
receptacles for collecting their garbage, and be required to 
have it in a place easy of access to the collector. 

For the final disposition of this city refuse, there should 
be a crematory, conveniently located, where all such matter 
can be burned and thoroughly destroyed. 

The service is under the management of Capt. J. D. Jer- 
vey, superintendent carts, and Mr. William McCarrell,, as- 
sistant superintendent. 

There was hauled out of the city in 1903 : 

Garbage and refuse. 41,483 Loads. 

Dead animals 356 

Street sweepings 6,815 Loads. 

CLEANING OF VAULTS. 

The obnoxious system of cleaning, which has existed for 
so many years, should certainly be done away with. If we 
must have these vaults, there should be means provided for 
the proper cleaning and removal of their contents. Special 
apparatus for pumping it into sanitary, covered and odor- 
less wagons, and removal to a crematory, where it is de- 
stroyed. This is the approval method and should be in- 
stalled in every city. 

A system of sewerage with the filling up of all vaults and 
cess-pools would, of course, do away with this evil, and 
prevent the passage of these obnoxious unsanitary, and un- 



IS Mayor Smyth's Annual Review, 

sightly carts, which we have a1 presenl passing through our 

streets. 

CITY DISPENSARY PHYSICIANS. 

The city is divided into six health districts, and six phy- 
sicians annually elected by Council, are assigned by the 
Hoard of Health, to serve in each respective district. They 
are required to reside in the district to which they are ap- 
pointed, and to attend to all calls of the indigent sick ap- 
plying to them for treatment; also to respond to all calls. 
night or day, of the sick in thejr respective districts, white 
or colored. 

This service is under the control of the Board of Health, 
in the care of a committee of the board, consisting of Mr. 
Hall T. McGee, chairman, C. I*. Ainiar, W. P. Carrington. 

The assignments for 1 !>();> were as follows: 

City Dispensary District No. 1 — William Mazyck, M. D. 

City Dispensary District No. 2 — Roland Alston, M. D. 

City Dispensary District No. 3— A. C. Wildhagen, M. I). 

City Dispensary District No. 4 — G. Fraser Wilson, M. 1). 

City Dispensary District No. 5— J. P. Galvin, M. D. 

City Dispensary District No. (i — *J. La Roche Wilson, 
M. D. 

*Dr. J. La Roche Wilson resigned December 1, 1903, and 
Dr. II. W. De Sanssnre was appointed in his place for the 
unexpired term. 

CITY DISPENSARY DRUGGISTS. 

Six dispensary druggists are elected by the Board of 
Health each year, they also being required to have their 
Apothecary Shops in the districts to which they are as- 
signed. They are required to furnish all medicines and to 
fill all prescriptions, for the indigent sick, which are sent 
to them from the city dispensary physicians of their re- 
spective districts. 

This department is under the committee in charge of the 
dispensary physicians. 



Department of Health. 79 

The following were the druggists appointed in 1903: 

Health District No. 1— A. O. Barbot & Son. 
Health District No. 2 — Dr Joshua Lockwood. 
Health District No. 3—1. K. Wilson & Co. 
Health District No. 4— Frank M. Smith. 
Health District No. 5 — Walter Speissegger. 
Health District No. 6— W. H. Zeigler. 

BACTERIOLOGICAL DEPARTMENT. 

The value of having a bacteriological department can be 
attested by the many calls made upon it by the physicians in 
the city. 

It is invaluable in the early diagnosis of diphtheria, in 
which, by the early use of antitoxin, this once dreaded dis- 
ease is freed from many of its ill-feared results. 

The examination of water, where typhoid cases occur, al- 
most invariably traces its source to contaminated cistern 
or well water. From these results we know that polluted 
cisterns are the sources of infection in typhoid fever, there- 
fore the sooner they are done away with and a supply fur- 
nished, freed from contamination by filtration, the sooner 
will we get rid of this fatal and treacherous disease. 

Dr. Robert Wilson, Jr., is in charge of our bacteriological 
department, and is an earnest worker in the cause of sani- 
tation. The work in this department is highly appreciated 
by the profession, and under separate heading is appended 
his report. 

Mr. J. Faber Porcher is clerk to the health officer and is 
also charged with the registration of vital statistics, and 
other work in connection with the department. The office 
is k;ept open from 9 to 3 every day in the year, also in the 
afternoons from 5 to 6 o'clock (Sunday and holidays, the 
office is kept open only in the morning from 9 :30 to 12 :30 
o'clock). 

The work in the office requires his constant care and at- 
tention. 



s " Mayor Smyth's Annual Review. 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 

Amount appropriated for general expenses (including $2,000 

for Quarantine $20,000 00 

CURRENT EXPENSES. 
Expended in 1903 

Health Officer $1,800 00 

Bacteriologist 1,008 19 

Clerk to Health Officer 1,000 00 

Health Detective 900 00 

Four Sanitary Inspectors 2,400 00 

Disinfection 1,380 44 

Quarantine 500 00 

$ 9,114 63 

Dispensary Physician $5,100 00 

Dispensary Druggists 2,818 30 

Pest House 1,730 05 

Hospital Commissioners, for use ambulance for 

smallpox cases 350 00 

$ 9,998 35 

Miscellaneous Expenses — 

Printing and Stationery $ 270 90 

Petty cash 35 16 

Repair drinking fountains 32 48 

Miscellaneous 197 62 

$ 536 16 

$19,649 14 
Balance to income account, city $ 350 86 

During the year we received $23 for the treatment of a 
small-pox ease, and also |75 for the rent of Plum Island. 

J. MERCEIR GREEN, M. D., 

Health Office?*. 

T- R, McGAHAN, Chairman Board of Health. 



Department of Health. 



81 



REPORT OF BACTERIOLOGIST. 

Charleston, S. 0., January 1st, 1904> 
Dr. J. Merceir Green, Health Officer, Charleston, S. C. : 

Sir — I have the honor to submit my annual report from 
the Bacteriological Laboratory of the Department of Health. 

The results of the examination of drinking water agree 
closely with those of former years. The large number of 
cisterns which have been condemned still point to the urgent 
need for a more wholesome water supply. 

Four samples of milk have been submitted for a bacteri- 
ological examination. Here I must again call attention to 
the inadequacy of a bacterialogical analysis of milk for de- 
termining its fitness for use. Milk that is quite pure from 
this point of view may be very unwholesome on account of 
physical and chemical impurities, and provision should be 
made if practicable for thus properly testing the milk that 
is sold in the city. 

In the appended tables is given a summary of the work 
which has been done. 

TABLE I. 



SAMPLES. 


Exam- 
ined. 


Con- 
demned. 




236 
14 
1 
2 
3 
1 
2 


91 
5 




2 


Well Water 


Artesian — Tradd near Meeting 

Artesian — King near Prices Alley 

Artesian — Queen and Franklin 

Artesian — Coming opposite George 







>_• 



Mayor Smyth's Annual Review. 



TAULK II. 



SPECIMENS. 



Blood, Malaria. . 
Blood, Typhoid. . . . 

Feces 

Milk 

Pleural Exudate. . . 

Pus 

Sputum, Pneumonia 
Sputum, Tuberculosi 
Swabs, Diphtheria. . 

Tumors 

Urine 



L5 

567 

2 

1 
1 

<; 

L6 

290 

49 

9 

•2 



tf 



IS I 



90 
L5 



3^ 



« 1 
•n 'i 



178 



L2 



Respectfully submitted, 

ROBERT WILSON, Jr., M. D., 

Bacteriologist. 



Department of Health. 



83 



MORTUARY STATISTICS. 

Report of the Number of Deaths in the City of Charleston 
for Each Month for the Year 1903. 



WHITES. 



CAUSES OF DEATH. 


■- 

*-5 


33 


o 

u 
si 


< 






1-3 


a 

ex 

< 


0! 


u 

03 

O 

O 

c 


u 

fit 

2 

a> 

(> 



c 

03 


Is 

+-> 

H 


















i !! 

. .1 

3 1 


'4 
1 

;; 


3 

i 
1 


*3 


1 


Abscess, Ovarian 














1 


1 
















1 


Alcoholism 


1 
1 

7 
1 
2 


1 


1 


3 

1 

1 

2 


1 


'2 

i 
1 

1 


2 


3 


Anaemia Pernicious 


1 


Apoplexy 


Bl 1 


37 


Appendicitis 




1 


2| 2 . 


8 


Arterio Sclerosis 


i 


1 .. 


5 




;; 


1 


3 










2 


Brain, Congestion of 

Brain, Haematoma 


1 


1 


1 


5 
1 








1 












1 

1 


7 
i 


3 

'1 


i 


2 
5 

1 
1 

i 

1 
1 

1 


1 
1 


1 

3 

"2 

i 
1 


5 


4 


Bright's Disease, Chronic 

Bronchitis, Cap . . . 


4 


3 


4 
1 


5 


48 
1 








3 


Cancer 








1 


1 

1 
1 




3 


Cancer, Breast 








1 


Cancer, Face 










1 


Cancer, Liver 




2 






5 


Cancer, Pancreas . . 




1 


Cancer, Spleen 
















1 


Cancer, Stomach 


















1 


Cancer, Uteri . . 










2 


Cholera Infantum . . 












1 






2 


Convulsions . . 












2 


Cystitis 


















3 


Debility 












1 


Dentition 












1 
i 


1 


i 


1 


'i 


2 


Diabetes 




1 .. 






1 


Diarrhoea 




1 








1 


1 


2 


Dysentery 








1 


3 


Elephantiasis 






1 




2 



%4 Mayor Smyth's Annual Review. 

I'KATIIS IN THE (MTV OF CHARLESTON— Continued. 



WHITES. 



CAUSES OF DEATH. 


January. 
February. 


1 


'u 

Z- 

<j 




c 
— 


>. 




-. 

B 
-_ 

T 
/ 


z 

— 

c 




E 

a 


i 

■*r-> 
O 




1 




1 








1 






1 


1 

i 
2 

i 

2 

'2 

i 

1 
i 

1 


3 






1 








1 


1 


1 

2 


1 
1 

1 

1 
! 
4 


1 
2 

1 

3 
.2 


1 
1 

1 
1 


1 
i 

1 

3 

1 

1 

1 
1 

1 
1 


fl 






1 


1 

■i 
1 


7 






1 


IT) 








1 
1 


2 








2 


Erysipelas 

Fever, Malarial .. 








2 






1 


4 

6 
1 






1 




1 




1 




14 


Call Stone 




1 


Gangrene. . 








1 














1 

1 

1 

1 


1 
1 

1 


i 


1 
'l 


2 

"2 
2 

1 


1 












2 
l 


4 


Gastro Duodenitis 






1 




1 








8 


Heart Disease. . . 


2 




1 


3 


14 


Hemorrhage, Uterine 

Hydrocephalus 


1 
1 








1 


Ileo Colitis . 












2 










l 


l 




1 










?, 




1 


1 

1 


4 

;; 


1 


11 


Intestinal Obstruction 

Intussusception of Intestines. . . . 

Jaundice. . , 


1 
1 

1 












1 


Laryngitis 


1 


Laryngismus Stridulus 

Liver, Cirrhosis . . . „ 


1 








l 




i 


i 

i 

i 

2 


2 


'i 

1 
1 


i 

3 


1 

8 




?, 


Marasmus 






4 


Measles 








1 


Meningitis 




1 






3 






1 


Meningitis, Tubercular 




1 








4 


2 


1 






1 


Neurasthenia, 


1 
1 




5 


1 


l 

3 


3 


Old Age 


25 



Department of Health. 85 

DEATHS IN THE CITY OF CHARLESTON— Continued. 



WHITES. 



CAUSES OF DEATH. 


P 

a 

— 


5 

-Q 


o 




— 


05 

q 
p 




P 


5- 
0) 

£ 

Oh 
(0 
QQ 

1 
1 


o 
O 

■+3 

o 
C 


i " 

s 

o 
1 c 

15. 

i 

;; 

i 


s 
s 

i 

*5 


as 






1 


Pancreas Disease 






,! 








i 

i 

;: 


1 


Parturition 






1 


2 


Peritonitis 






' 


1 
1 
1 


i 
*i 


i 


2 


Peritonitis, Septic 








1 


Pneumonia 


4 i 


'i 


1 

'* 


16 


Pneumonia, Broncho 




1 


1 


Pneumonia, Catarrhal 

Pregnancy, Uterine Extra 

Pyonephritis 




1 
1 
1 


Pyosalpinx 




i 








1 


Rheumatism 


i 


l 


_ 


1 


l 
i 






2 






1 

*2 

*5 


3 


Septicaemia Puerperal 

Stricture, Oesophagus 

Surgical Shock 


::':: 


1 '.. 

::L! 


4 
1 
1 


Syphilis 










2 


Tetanus 

Trismus Nascentium 

Tuberculosis 


1 

*6 *3 

i 


*3 
1 


*5 


i 
i 


*5 

••I 




r 


1 
1 

A 


. i 

'i !! 

5 7 


1 

2 

62 

1 


Tubercular Laryngitis 


1 1 


Tumor 




1 1 


.1 


i 




1 


Tumor, Abdominal 


.. .. 


1 






2 


3 

2 


Whooping Cough 


..i 


1 
3 








Totals 


36 25 


38 


37 ' 


35 


40 


27 


39 


40 


34 


40' 


35 


426 



86 



Mayor Smyth's Annual Review. 



DEATHS IN THE CITY OF CHARLESTON Continued. 



BLACKS A.\J> COLORED. 



CA1 SES OF DEATH. 


u 




D 
~ 
<-• 


<3 








S3 
< 


Hi 

Z 

p, 

7 


: 
c; 
O 


g 

a 

c 


•r 



Z 





Abscess . . 


1 








... 






.J.... 



i.'. v. 

9 2 1 

'i '.'. '.'. 


1 .. .. 

;; '1'.'. 
1 .. .. 

2 3 3 


1 


Abscess, 1 lip Joint 




1 


1 


Abscess, Pelvic. . 








1 . . . . 


'1 




1 


Adenil is Tubercular 




1 






.'. i 


:::: 


1 


Aneurism 


1 


s 






1 


Apoplexy 


5 5 


3 

1 


6 


7 4 


452 


f^ 






1 


.. . 


1 

i 

2 

11 


2 






2 


Asihenia 


1 
1 










1 

1 

10 

1 


7. 

7. 




7 




• 


Bowels, Obstruction of 


1 






2 

' 1 
1 

8 
2 
1 


15 

1 
1 
1 


1. 

10 

1 

1 


8 


. 


Brain. Embolism of 

Brain. Softening 




1 






11 1 

11 G 


IS 


Brighl 's Disease, ( Chronic 


13 


14 13 
1 .. 
1 .. 


9 

2 


128 

7 


Bronchitis, Capillary. . 








,1 






1 








1 


Cancer, Mammary.. 


1 










1 


Cancer, Rectum 




1 


1 












1 


i 

2 


3 


1 

:: 

1 

2 

1 

1 

1 

'4 
1 


1 




1 . . 


4 






1 








1 








1 










1 




.. 


2 1.. 


j 


Cholera Morbus 


1 








.... 


1 




.... 


1 










1 
1 


1 


'3 




1 


Convulsions . 


2 


1 


1 


2 

1 

:: 
l 

3 

'2 

4 
1 
3 


1 2 


2 

1 
1 

i 

4 

'3 


IS 




1 


Debility 














1 
3 

*2 

i 


1 
'2 
2 

2 
1 

'4 
1 


1 

1 

4 

'l 


fl 








1 




1 


'5 
"1 

2 

1 


1 








1(1 


Dermatitis 


1 


"l 


1 
1 

2 

1 


1 


1 




19 




? 








f 






1 


8 






1 














4 




6 
2 

1 


3 
1 


3 
1 
3 


7 

i 


9 

'3 
1 


2 
2 
5 


3 s 


F>7 


Enteritis, Tubercular 


'7 


1 
4 


8 
3? 


Epilepsy 




1 




3 








3 



Department of Health. 87 

DEATHS IN THE CITY OF CHARLESTON— Continued. 



BLACKS AND COLORED. 
















CAUSES OF DEATH. 


u 


>> 
u 

p 
u 
Xi 

05 




<1 


2 


03 

3 
1-3 


>> 

Ha 


18 

P 
<1 


s 

a- 


u 
93 

c 
■*5 


C 


E 

03 



u 

03 
,25 

£ 

s 

Q 
1 


03 


Fever, Malarial 


1 
3 




i 


6 

1 


1 

2 


2 a 


4 
1 


5 

2 

i 

1 


1 

2 

i 
1 

i 


3 

2 


?,?, 


Fever, Typhoid 


3 
"i 

1 


1 

i 

1 


21 


Fistula 


1 


Furunculosis 








1 


Gangrene 










1 

i 


1 


Gastritis. 


1 
1 








1 .. 

j" 

5 6 


6 


Gastro Enteritis 


5 


Haemophilia 


1 


Heart, Disease of 


2 


5 

1 


2 


5 6 

" V [ 

r ' 


"1" 


7 '. 8 

2 ' 


59 
1 


Hemorrhage, Uterine 


Hernia, Strangulated... .. .. .. 

Hydrocephalus 




1 
2 


Hydronephrosis 






. 


i 


1 


1 






X 

1 


2 


Hydrophobia 




l 


i 




1 


1 


Icterus Neanatorum 










9 

3 


1 


3 




7 


Ileo Colitis. . .". 












1 ' 


2 


Inanition 








i 


:: 


.. 


i 
i 


'i 


1 
i 


1 


1 

1 


1 


4 


Influenza 




1 


2 


6 
3 
1 


Insanity 




Insolation 












1 

I 

1 


Intestinal Obstruction 










l 


3 








2 




2 


Jaundice . . 






1 


Laparotomy 












1 


Laryngismus Stridulus 






1 


















i 
'5 

3 

2 
i 


1 








1 


Liver, Cirrhosis 




1 


i 
l 

2 


'9 


*5 


5 


1 
i 

"2 


i 

6 

1 


1 
2 

i 
3 


'2 


3 
1 


2 






1 


Lungs, Congestion 




2 


4 


Malnutrition 




2 


Marasmus 

Mastoiditis 


5 


1 


47 
1 


Melancholia 
















1 


Meningitis 




1 


•• 


1 


- 


2 
1 

1 

2 
1 


1 

4 

2 


1 


5 


Meningitis, Cerebro Spinal 




1 


Meningitis, Tubercular 












1 


Old Age 


2 
2 


1 


1 
2 




4 

i 


21 


Parturition 


10 


Peritonitis 


1 


Peritonitis, Pelvic 

Phlegmanous Inflam., Leg of . . . . 


1 
1 



NS Mayor Smyth's Annual Review. 

DEATHS IN THE CITY OF CHARLESTON— Continued. 



BLACKS AND COLORED. 



CAUSES OF DEATH. 


- 
- 


u 

P 


o 

1 


u. 

< 


<< 


g 


1 


/. 

& 


* 

% 

c 


s\> 



fe 


E 
S 

a 
P 


c 
H 


Pneumonia. . . .... 


12 


12 


7 


4 

1 


5 


8 
2 


3 


2 


1 


1 


6 

"l 

1 
i 

2 

'5 
11 


10 

4 

i 

2 
11 


71 


Pyosalpinx 


3 


Pvaemia 








1 


Renal Insufficiency 






l'.. 






1 






1 


1 


Rheumatism 

Rachitis 




1 
1 


..... 


3 

2 


Salpingitis 








1 
2 


Sarcoma 






2 .. 
1 


1 






1 


1 
1 

'2 

3 

11 

1 


1 

1 
1 

1 

1 

':''» 
9 

'i 
1 

1 

* ■ ■ 


Septicaemia 






4 
3 


Septicaemia, Puerperal 










Scrofula 










2 


Spina Bifida 
















1 

1 

1 

3 
LO 


1 


Stricture, Urethra 

Sunstroke 








1 






I 


2 
1 


Syphilis 




1 


"% 


1 


"J 


1 
2 


2 

'i 
•l 

i r , 


8 


Tabes Mesenterica 

Tetanus 


4 


4 
13 


Toxaemia, Intestinal 




2 


Trismus, Nascentium 

Tuberculosos 


3 
13 


2 


2 1 


2 
20 


3 
16 


33 
161 


Tuberculosis, Intestinal 


2 .. 


3 


Tubercular Peritonitis 








1 
1 






i 


1 


Tumor, Brain 








1 


Tumor, Pelvic 








2 


Tumor, Uteri. . . . 














1 


Ulcer, Gastric 
















1 


1 


1 


Variola 




1 


2 


■>, i 




2 


9 










1 


Whooping Cough 






3 


4 


2 


3 


3 


1 


16 












Total 








86 


92 




99 








76 


74 


1041 



Department of Health. 



89 



ACCIDENTS, PREMATURE BIRTHS, STILL BORNS. 



WHITES. 




u 

u 

o 

|X| 


u 
u 

3 


<1 


£ 

£ 

3 


g 




CO 

1 
1 


£ 

at 

P- 




i 

c 
-p 

C 


u 

,2 

g 
z 
> 

c 


,25 

£ 

8 

s 

A 


03 
"Si 
O 


Accidents 


2 




2 
1 


1 




*2 
1 
1 
1 


3 


2 

i 

1 
1 
1 

6 


i 

1 


1 

i 

• 6 

2 


1 
l 
1 

3 


12 


Burns 


2 


Cyanosis 






5 


Asphyxia 












3 


Suicide 






1 

1 


3 




3 


Undeveloped 






6 








1 














1 

i; 


8 


2 


fl 


Total 


2 




5 


4 


~ 


34 








BLACK AND COLORED. 
Accidents 


1 

2 
5 


i 

6 

l 

i 1 

9 




.'8 
8 


3 

1 
5 

1 

10 


*6 
1 

1 


1 
'3 

i 

5 


3 


A 


3 

6 
9 


1 
6 

7 


1 

1 
3 

5 


17 


Burn 


.1 


5 


Undeveloped 

Murder 


7 


1 


56 
3 


Drowned 




2 


Totals 


8 


10 


5 


~~83 



STILL-BORN. 



White 

Black and Colored 



Totals . 



2 




3 


2 


1 


4 


2 


3 


3 


5 


4 


1 


10 


16 


12 


8 19 

1 


11 


14 


13 


14 


1.9 


11 


12 


12 


16 


15 


10Wl5 


16 


16 


17 


24 


15 


22 



30 

168 

198 



PREMATURE BIRTH. 
White 




1 
1 


1 

1 


i 

1 




4 

2 

6 


2 
3 

5 


1 
3 

4 


2 
1 

3 


3 
3 


1 

3 

4 


1 

3 

4 


1? 


Black and Colored 


1 
1 


21 


Totals 


33 



90 



May or Smyth's Annual Review. 



MARRIAGES, BIRTHS, TWINS. 



MARRIAGES. 



White 

Black and Colored. 



Totals. 



I g B 

hj - <i 



22 L9 9 24 L3 

23 20 28 27 11 



45 



39 37:5124 



15 16 
Hi 19 

31 35 



27 



39 



222 
431 



BIRTHS. 
White 


32 

77 

109 


IT, 
43 

fifl 


24 
55 


28 
52 


24 
50 

74 


29 
51 

S3 


32 
106 


26 

59 

S5 


20 
50 

7(> 


37 40 

70 72 

; 

107 115 


26 
46 

72 


343 


Black and Colored 


702 
1045 















TWINS. 
White 








3 




1 














4 


Black and Colored 


1 


2 




1 


.1 




..4 




1 


10 










Totals 


1 


2 




3 


•• 


1 


1 


.1 




..4 


" 


.i 


14 



Department of Health. 



91 



NUMBER OF DEATHS, WITH AGES FOR EACH 
MONTH, FOR THE YEAR 1903. 



WHITES. 


5h 
>-3 


M 

PR 




< 


3 


a3 




CO 

<1 




-p 

5 


u 
<v 

,Q 
O 
-(J 

o 

O 

6 


s 

o 


a> 

s 


03 

O 

H 


Under 1 year . . . . 


1 


1 


5 


4 


3 


6 


2 


2 


2 


1 


38 


From 1 to f> years . . 




1 


4 


3 


4 


1 


3 


2 


4 


1 


1 


4 


28 


From 5 to 10 years. . 
From 10 to 20 years. 




1 




1 






1 




1 








4 


1 




2 


1 


1 






6 




2 


1 


3 


17 


From 20 to 30 years. 


4 


4 


3 


2 


1 


3 


1 


5 


4 


4 


8 


5 


44 


From 30 to 40 years. 


7 


1 


5 


6 


2 


4 


3 


3 


8 


2 


2 


5 


48 


From 40 to 50 vears. 


4 


3 


2 


4 


9 


3 


5 


5 


4 


3 


7 


3 52 


From 50 to 60 years. 


5 


4 


1 


2 


3 


4 


2 


3 


4 


4 


7 


5! 44 


From 60 to 70 years. 


7 


5 


2 


8 


7 


9 


1 


5 


3 


6 


2 


3 58 


From 70 to 80 years. 


5 


5 


6 


3 


3 


7 


5 


6 


5 


3 


7 


4 59 


From 80 to 90 years. 


2 




6 


2 


2 


3 


4 


2 


2 


3 


3 


1 


30 


From 90 to 100 years 






9 


1 
















1 


4 
























































Totals 


36 


25 


38 


37 


35 


40 


27 


39 


40 


34 


40 


35 


426 



COLORED AND 
BLACKS. 

Under 1 year 

From 1 to 5 years . . . 
From 5 to 10 years. . 
From 10 to 20 years. 
From 20 to 30 years. 
From 30 to 40 years. 
From 40 to 50 years. 
From 50 to 60 years. 
From 60 to 70 years. 
From 70 to 80 years. 
From 80 to 90 years*. 
From 90 to 100 years 


21 
5 
3 
6 

13 
8 
8 
9 
8 
3 

"2 


18 
3 

ii 

9 

8 
10 
11 

6 

2 


14 
10 

*9 

9 
13 
14 

7 
8 

"i 

1 


20 
9 
2 
9 

12 
6 

13 
8 
5 
2 


22 
10 
3 
8 
14 
8 
5 
9 
6 
4 
3 


25 
16 

2 
11 
19 

6 
H 

10 

3 

2 

1 

, 1 


24 

13 

6 

5 

11 

10 

10 

6 

10 

2 

1 

1 


22 

14 
3 
6 

10 
6 

10 
4 
5 
2 
2 


12 
9 
3 
8 
10 
13 
7 
9 
8 
4 
4 


13 
10 

*4 

11 
7 
13 
16 
11 
1 


12 

9 

3 

7 

12 

12 

10 

5 

5 

1 


15 
6 
2 
3 
12 
10 
9 
5 
9 
2 
1 


218 

114 

27 

87 

142 

107 

120' 

99 

84 

25 

13 

5 






















86 


78 


86 


86 


92 


107 
















Totals 


99 


84 


87 


86 


76 


74 


1041 



:»•' 



Mayor Smyth's Annual Review. 



NUMBER OF DEATHS IX EACH WAKD IN EACH 

MONTH. 























:-, 








WRITES. 


eS 


3 


^= 


• 








Cfi 


s 




t 


£ 


oo 






— 




< 




3 


9 


u 

< 


Ph 





C 


> 





S 


E- 


Ward 1 


2.L..I 2 


2 


2 


2 


1 


1 




3 


3 


2 


20 


Ward 2 




1 .. . 


2 
2 
4 


"2 

2 


2 
1 
5 


2 
1 


3 
3 
2 


2 
3 
3 


4 


3 
3 

1 


2 


17 


Ward 3 


1 
5 


1 


4 
3 


21 


Ward 4 


4 33 


Ward 5 


:: 


1 


1 


2 


2 


4 




2 


5 


4 


3 


1 28 


Ward G 


2 2 


3 


6 


4 


3 


3 


2 


. . . 


2 


2 


3 32 


Ward 7 


1 


4 




3 


3 


2 


4 


. . . 


2 


1 


. . . 


2 22 


Ward 8. . . 


8 


3 


8 


7 


12 


8 


6 


11 


13 


8 


13 


8! 105 


Ward 0.. . 


9 
1 
4 


4 
3 
4 


7 
5 
5 


:: 


:: 


8 
3 

1 


5 
2 
3 


5 

1 


3 

2 
6 


:: 
4 

5 


4 
3 
4 


6 61 


Ward 10 


4 ! 32 


Ward 11. . . 


3 


2 


3 41 


Ward 12 




2 


38 


3 


3 


1 




3 


1 




1 


... 14 










Totals 


36 25 


37! 35 


27 39 40 34 


40 


35 


426 



COLORED AND 

BLACKS. 

Ward 1 

Ward 2 

Ward 3 

Ward 4 

Ward 5 

Ward <> 

Ward 7 

Ward 8 

Ward 9 

Ward 10 

Ward 11 

Ward 12 

Totals 



5 

4 
2 
9 
LO 
2 
5 



17 12 12 
6 6 10 

4 6 4 

10 5! 17 
12 1 18 17 



12 7 

5, 8 

7| 9' 

9, 6 



16: 12 24 



7 5 

5 11 

21 11 

13 12 



86 78 86 86 92 107 99 84 87 



4 


2 


4 


1 


1 




3 3 


1 


8 3 


6 


6 


6 


4 


2 


1 


2 


3 


3 


2 


20 


25 


15 


6 


11 


7 


4 


8 


8 


12 


8 


16 


17 


5 


9 


86 


76 


74 



48 

2^ 
32 

79 

(.4 

53 

62 

216 

86 

71 

158 

L50 



Department of Health. 



93 



NUMBERS OF DEATHS IN EACH MONTH, WITH 
PLACE OF NATIVITY, FOR THE YEAR 1903. 

WHITES. 



NATIVES OF 


>> 

U 

ss 

d 

d 

a 
hs 

18 
5 
1 

1 

4 
1 

4 


c3 
P 
U 

13 

6 

*2 

3 

1 


O 

u 
a 

25 
S 
1 

1 

i 
l 

l 


Ph 

<1 

21 
6 
1 

'2 

1 
1 
1 

2 
1 
1 


17 
6 

3 

3 

i 
1 

'2 
1 
1 


a 

18 
5 
1 

3 

6 
1 

2 

;; 

1 
1 


P 

hs 

8 
10 

*4 
1 

i 

i 

1 


EC 

d 
bp 
d 

20 
8 
1 

5 

i 
2 

1 


5-1 

c, 

£ 

-(J 

(^ 
d 

GQ 

21 
5 
1 

'l 

*6 

1 
1 

i 

i 
1 


rO 
O 
-P 

15 
7 
1 

4 

3 

1 

"i 


u 

QJ 

£ 

c 

20 
t 

1 

4 

1 
1 

1 
1 

i 

i 


a 
8 

R 

18 

7 
1 

i 
1 

2 

'1 

1 
1 

2 

35 


CO 

-p 

H 


City of Charleston 

South Carolina 


214 
81 


North Carolina 


9 


Maryland 

Ireland 


1 
34 


Russia 

Germany 

England 


3 

32 

5 


New York 




9 


Georgia 






3 


Spain 








1 


Louisiana 








1 
3 


Florida 








Poland 










1 


Delaware . . 










2 


Pennsylvania 










1 


Italy.. . 












2 


Canada. . . . 












1 


Massachusetts 














3 
















1 


















3 




















1 




















1 
























1 






. . 




















1 


Unknown 

Totals 


2 
__ 

36 


* 
25 


38 


37 


35 


2 

40 


1 

27 


1 
39 


1 

40 


2 
34 


1 

40 


12 
426 



!»t 



Mayor Smyth's Annual Review. 



NUMBER OF DEATHS IN EACH MONTH, WITH 
PLACE OV NATIVITY, FOR THE YEAR 1903. 



COLORED AND BLACKS. 



NATIVES OF 




- 

a 
■- 






a 


1-3 


13 


CI 

<1 


I 

7 


u 

-- 

c 
c 

C 


a 

> 
C 


E 
S 

0) 


O 


City of Charleston 

South ( Jarolina 


59 
26 

1 


52 

2\ 

1 
1 


51 
30 

1 


tit 
17 

2 


21 
2 


61 

40 

1 

i 
i 


53 66 
35 IS 


111 

r,r, 

l 

i 


53 

2 1 

1 
1 
1 

i 


46 48 

28 25 


679 
3?,1 


North Carolina 


1 


;; 


1 


1 
74 


9 


New Jersey 


3 


Virginia . . 




4 


Tennessee 






1 




1 
1 


1 


Georgia 






3 


West Indies . 










1 


Alabama. . 










1 


Massachusetts 














1 


Connecticut. . 


















1 


Florida 




















1 


Unknown , , 

Totals 


si; 


7S 


,x<; 


3 

86 


4 

92 


3 
107 


99 


84 


i 

87 


5 

si; 


1 

76 


17 
1041 























Department of Health. 
TOTAL MORTALITY. 



95 







« 














& 




u 


u 




SEX IN EACH 
MONTH. 


>* 
u 

a 

1-3 

21 


1 

13 


16 


<1 


K*9 


0? 
1-3 


It) 


<1 




u 
as 

o 

■+3 

o 

O 


s 

> 


£ 

8 




White, Male 


19 


19 


19 


18 


20 


23 


18 


24 


16 


226 


White, Female 


15 


12 


22 


18 


16 


21 


9 


19 


17 


16 


16 


19 


200 


Totals 


36 


25 


38 


37 


35 


40 


27 


39 


40 


34 


40 


35 


426 


Colored, Males 


37 


42 


38 


48 


45 


51 


44 


45 


32 


44 


38 


30 


494 


Colored, Females 


49 
86 


36 

78 


48 
86 


38 
86 


47 
92 


56 
107 


55 
99 


39 


55 


42 


38 


44 


547 


Totals 


84 


87 


86 


76 


74 


1041 


Grand Total . . . 


122 


103 


124 


123 


127 


147 


126 


123 


127 


120 


116 


109 


1467 









96 



Mayor Smyth's Annual Review. 
COMPARATIVE MORTALITY 



\ EARS. 



1903 
L902 

1901 
1900 
L899 
1898 

189 7 
1896 
1895 
1894 

1893 
1892 
1891. 

1890 
1889 
1888 
1887 
1886 
1885, 
1884. 
1883. 
1882 
1881 
1880. 
1879 
1878. 
1877. 
1876. 
1875. 
1874. 
1873. 
1872. 
1871. 
1870. 
1869, 



w nil i;s. 






24,285 

24,285 
24,285 
24,285 
28,870 
28, 870| 
28,870 
28,870 
28,870, 
28,870 
28,870 
28,870 
28, 870 I 
28,870^ 
27,605, 
27,605| 
27,605 
27,605 
27,605) 
27,605; 
27, 605 1 
25,000 
22,713 
22,713! 
22,713 
22,713! 
24.528' 
24.528 
24.528] 
24.000 1 
22.145 
22.145 
22.145 
22.145 
20.353 






426 
Uil 
477 
484 
526 
491 
447 
52] 
540 
479 

535 
586 
553 

511 
5 1 6 

419 
549 

571 
4X7 
592 
540 
5X4 
651 
500 
517 
514 
555 
668 
<;24 

718 
5()7 
521 
714 
539 
453 



.2 5 

u 

o ^ 



in 51 
in 54 
in 54 
in 58 
in G4 
in 55 
in 53 
in 60 
in 52 
in 49 
in 52 
in 56 
in 52 
in 56 
in 50 
in 48 
in 56 
in 42 
in 46 
in 45 
in 34 
in 45 
in 43 
in 43 
in 44 
in 36 
in 39 
in 33 
in 43 
in 40 
in 81 
in 41 
in 441 



BLACKS & COLORED 



31,522 
31,522 
31 522 
31,522 
36,295 
36,295 
36,295 
36,295 
36,295 
36,295 
36,295 
36,295 
36,295 
36/295 
32,540 
32,540 
32,540 
32,540 
32,540 
32,540 
32,540 
27,286 
27,286 
27,286 
27,286 
27,286 
32,012 
32,012 
32,012 
26,000 
26,811 
26,811 
26,811 
26,811 
24,570 









1,041 
1,153 
1,149 
1,242 
1,277 
1,258 
1,143 
1,348 
1,297 
1,300 
1,284 
1,317 
1,371 
1,310 
1,431 
1,375 



316 
596 
250 
215 
286 
1,172 
1,292 
1,121 
1,075 
1,125 
1,258 
1,343 
1,240 
1,230 



069 

036 
956 
075 

819 



in 32 
in 27 
in 27 
in 28 
in 39 
in 28 
in 31 
in 26 
in 28 
in 27 
in 28 
in 27 
in 28 
in 26 
in 23 
in 23 
in 24 
in 20 
in 26 
in 22 
in 28 
i" 23 
in 21 
in 24 
in 25 
in 24 
in 25 
in 23 
in 25 
in 21 
in 26 
in 25 
m 28 
in 24 
in 26 



Department of Health. 



97 



YEARS. 


White. 


Black 
and 
Colored. 


Total. 


1 ( J03. . 


17.50 
18.98 
19.10 
18.21 
18.21 
16.97 
15.52 
18.04 
18.70 
18.68 
18.53 
20.29 
19.15 
17.70 
19.05 
18.78 
19.52 
20.65 
17.64 
23.68 
21.60 
22.32 
28.66 
22.01 
20.68 
20.95 
22.66 


32.99 
36.49 
36.45 
35.10 
35.19 
34.13 
31.49 
37.14 
35.45 
35.81 
35.37 
36.28 
37.77 
36.93 
43.66 
42.25 
40.40 
49.01 
38.49 
44.63 
47.13 
42.91 
47.13 
40.43 
43.59 
35.14 
30.29 


26.28 


1902 


28.88 


1901 


29.09 


1900 


30.90 


1899 


27.66 


1898 


26.82 


1897 


24.39 


1896 


28.68 


1895 


28.18 


1894 


27.29 


1893 


27.91 


1892 


29.20 


1891 


29.06 


1890 


27.94 


1889 


30.79 


1888 


30.87 




31.00 


1886 


33.02 




28.88 


1884 


34.55 
34.92 


1882 


33.11 




38.08 


1880 


32.44 




27.92 


1878 


28.95 




32.05 











: ; i 



18 



r Smyth'* Annual Ttecu w. 



INTERMENTS. 



interments weir made within tlic City Limits during the 
year \ { MK\ at the following burial grounds: 



WHITES. 



r: P=h 



Bethel Church yard 1 

( 'ircular ( 'hureh yard 

Firsl Baptist Church yard 1 

i'ir>t Presbyterian Church yard.. .. 

K. K. B. R., Coining street 

Seamans ( 'hnrrh yard 

Second Presbyterian Church yard 
Si. John's Chapel Church yard.. 
Si . John's Iai1 heran ( !hurch yard . 

St. Michael's Church yard 

St. Patrick's Church yard 

St. Peter's Church yard 

St. Philip's Church' yard 

! nil arian ( 'hureh yard 

Wentworth Street Lutheran. . . . 



Totals 



. 1 
. 1 
1 1 



6 9 



7. ' — 

fj li 

— s j= 5 - 

<*< ^ l-T "^ ''/. 

I 



1 



1 



I 

1 2 



1 
2 ] 



5 3 



c £ 
C fc 



:: 
l 

3 
2 
2 
2 
I 
26 
5 
1 
I 
1 

r, 
4 
1 



3 9 5 61 



COLORED AND BLACK. 



!>ccr>!i( Ua ( '1 lurch yard 
( 'alvarv Episcopal . . 

Colored Catholic 

( 'olored tail heran . . . . 

( "olored Scotch 

Ephral 

Field of Resl 

McPhelia 

Wysingers or Brandt's, 

Totals 



. . 1 41 3 1 4 2 ' li 2 

1 .. 1 . . 1 2 . . 1 . 
J 1 

9 6 6 6 9 

610 6 6U0 
1 

7 5 5 13 11 



9 612 
4 5 
. 1 
2 5 



10 



II 1 3 4 



37 25 23 2!) 33 3*3 IS 30 24 29 2D 21* 332 



3 

1 

10 11 



4 2 



30 

10 

3 
93 
75 

3 

90 

1 



PTT.LTC. 



White 

Colored and Black 



1 

33 38 33 



Totals 



34 



38 33 



24 39 38 50 32 



3.. 2 
29 41 22 



37 



28 42 38 50 34 32 41 24 37 



15 

416 

431 



98 



• Smyth's . [nnual Revu w. 



INTERMENTS. 

interments were made within the City Limits during the 
year 1903 al the following burial grounds: 



WHITES. 



Bethel Church yard 

( ircular < !hurch vard 

Firsl Baptist Church yard 

Firsl Presbyterian Church yard.. 

K. K. B. E., ( 'oming street 

Sea mans ( 'linreli yard 

Second Presbyterian Church vard 
St. John's Chapel Church yard. . 
St. John's Lutheran Church vard. 
Si. Michael's Church yard. ... 

si. Patrick's Church yard 

St. Peter's Church yard 

St. Philip's Church yard 

Unitarian ( lunch vard 

Wentworth Street Lutheran. . . . 

Totals 



sl§ 



£ & 



1 1 



■i|5 

i .. 



:i 

l l 



6 9 



:i. 



a i § %• p 

£ 1-3 I- <j CC 



1 






C fc 



1 
1 *2 



1 1 



1 .. 

2 1 



5 3 






1 

. 1 .. 
2 5 3 
•I l 1 .. 



3 

1 
3 
2 
2 
2 
1 
26 
5 
1 
1 

1 
6 
i 
1 



3 9 5 61 



COLORED AND BLACK. 




1 

'i 


4 
1 


3 


1 

1 


4 


2 1 


? 


3 

1' 
1 

8 
3 

1 
11 

29 


2 
2 

*8 
6 

7 

*4 

29 


7 

i 

LO 

5 

4 

2 

29 


30 


( 'alvary Episcopal 

Colored Catholic 


1 


2 . . 1 




10 
3 


( 'olored tail hera n . .... 


9 6 


6 
6 

r, 

' 1 
23 


r; 


9 


9 6 12 


4 
7 

LO 

'l 

24 


93 


Colored Scotch 

Ephral 


6 

1 

7 

*3 

27 


LO 

5 

*2 

25 


610 


7 

io 


4 5 
. . 1 
2 5 

4 5 

1 8 30 


75 
3 


Field of Rest 

McPhelia 

Wysingers or Brandl 's 

'l'ot als 


13 
"l 
29 


1 1 

l 

33 


90 

1 

27 

332 



PUBLIC. 



While 

Colored and Blacl< 
Totals 



1 






4 


3 .. 




2 


3 




2 




33 


38 33 


24 


39 38 50 


32 


29 


41 22 


37 


34 


38 


33 


28 


42 38 


50 


34 


32 


41 


24 


37 



15 

416 

431 



mo -en 



Health Department. 99 

Annual Summary of Meteorological Observations 
Made by the U. S. Department of Agriculture, 
Weather Bureau, at Charleston, S. C, 1903. 



air pressure. 



Mean, corrected for temperature, instrumental error and gravity, 8 
a. m., 30.05 inches. 

Mean, corrected for temperature, instlutnental error and gravity, 8 
p. m., 30.02 inches. 

Mean annual, corrected for temperature, instrumental error and grav- 
ity, 30.02 inches. 

Mean, reduced to sea-level, 8 a. m., 30.10 inches. 

Mean, reduced to sea-level, 8 p. m., 30.07 inches. 

Mean annual, reduced to sea-level, 30.07 inches. 

Highest, reduced to sea-level, 30.57 inches, February 19. 

Lowest, reduced to sea-level, 29.22 inches, February 16. 

Annual range in pressure, 1.35 inches. 

The average annual pressure, reduced to sea-level, of Charleston, S. C, 
for 30 years, is 30.06 inches. For the months: January, 30.15 inches; 
February, 30.12; March, 30.05; April, 30.03; May, 30.01; June, 30.01; 
July, 30.02; August, 30.01; September. 30.04; October, 30.06; November, 
30.11; December, 30.14. 

The extreme ranges in atmospheric pressure, reduced to sea-level, for 
the months, of Charleston, S. C, during the past 33 years, are as follows: 
January: highest, 30.83 inches, on January 2, 1899; lowest, 29.42 inches, 
on January 8, 1886. February: highest, 30.66 inches, on February 28. 
1897; lowest, 29.20 inches, on February 6, 1896. March: highest, 30.72 
inches, on March 6, 1873; lowest, 29.33 inches, on March 11, 1896. April: 
highest, 30.58 inches, on April 21, 1897; lowest, 29.29 inches, on April 13, 
1877. May: highest, 30.42 inches, on May 21, 1891; lowest, 29.48 inches, 
on May 21, 1883. June: highest, 30.35 inches, on June 1, 1902; lowest, 
29.31, on June 17, 1882. July: highest, 30.36 inches, on July 19, 1896; 
lowest, 29.70 inches, on July 12, 1879. August: highest, 30.28. inches, on 
August 21, 1882; lowest, 28.76 inches, on August 25, 1885. September: 
highest, 30.40 inches, on September 30, 1871; lowest, 29.27 inches, on 
September 26, 1894. October: highest, 30.59 inches, on October 26, 1879; 
lowest, 28.91 inches, on October 13, 1893. November: highest, 30.70 
inches, on November 19, 1891; lowest, 29.14 inches, on November 17, 
1873. December: highest, 30.74 inches, on December 28, 1896; lowest, 
29.28 inches, on December 10, 1878. Absolute ranges: maximum, 30.83 
inches, on January 2, 1899; minimum, 28.76 inches, on August 25, 1885. 



1'Hi Mayor Smyth's Annual Review. 

All: TEMPERAT1 RE. 

Mean, s a. m.. (il .3 degrees. 

Mean. 8 p. in.. 6 L9 degrees. 

Mean annual, 65.1 degrees. 

The average annual temperature, of Charleston, S. ('.. for thirty years, 
is 66.1 degrees. For the months: January, 49.8 degrees; February, 52.7; 
March, 57.3; April. (54.8: May, 72.it; June, 79.4; July. 81.9; August, 81.0; 
September, 76.4; October, 66.9; November, 58.3; December, 51.6. 

Highest," 98, August 28. 

Lowest, 24, February 18. 

Annual range in temperature, 74. 

Greatest daily range, 35, February 17. 

Least daily range, 2. September 14. 

Greatest monthly range. 53, in November. 

Least monthly range. 25, in July. 

Mean monthly range. 38. 

Mean daily range, 14. 

Number of days on which temperatures were above 90: 20 days; in 
May. 3 days; June, 1: duly. 5; August. 11. 

The average number of days on which temperatures were above 90, 
at Charleston, S. 0., for 30 years, is 6. For the months: June, 6 days; 
duly. 11: August, 6; September, 1. 

Number of days on which temperatures were below 32: 13 days; in 
January, 4 days; February, 2; November, 3; December, 4. 

ddie average number of days on which temperatures were below 32, at 
Charleston, S. C, for 30 years, is 2 days. For the months: January, 3 
days; February, 2; December, 2. 

Last ice formed: February 18. 

First ice formed: November 19. 

The highest and lowest monthly mean temperatures, for the months, 
of Charleston, S. C, during the past 33 years, are as follows: January: 
highest monthly mean, 59.3 degrees, in 1890; lowest monthly mean, 

42.8. in 1886. February, highest, 61.0, in 1884; lowest, 41.1, in 1895. 
March: highest, 04.4. in 1871; lowest. 51.8, in 1872. April: highest, 69.8. 
in 1871; lowest. 59.2, in 1901. May: highest, 76.8. in 1896; lowest, 68.6, in 
1S77. dune: highest. 82.6. in 1871; lowest, 75.7, in 1884. July: highest, 
s;>.4. in 1875: lowest. 78.8, in 1S<>4. August: highest. 84.2, in 1900; lowest, 

77.9. in 1874. September: highest, 80.5, in 1881; lowest, 72.0, in 1871. 
October: highest, 72.2, in 1881; lowest, 62.2, in 1876. November: highest, 
03.2. in 1902; lowest, 53.2, in 1901. December: highest, 60.0, in 1889; 
lowest, 43.8, in 1876. Highest annual mean, 67.8, year 1890; lowest an- 
nual mean, 64.0, year 1886. 

The extreme ranges in temperature, for the months, of Charleston, 
S. ('.. during the past thirty-three years are as follows: January: 
maximum. 80 degrees, January 29, 1879; minimum. 10, January 11, 1886. 



Health Department. 101 

February: maximum, SO. February 18, 1891; minimum, 7, February 14, 
1890. March: maximum, 86, March 21, 1807; minimum, 24, March 5, 
1873. April: maximum, 80, April 21, 1896; minimum, 32, April 2, 1881. 
May: maximum, OS, May 30, 1898; minimum, 45, May 20, 1804. June: 
maximum, 100, June 14. 1880: minimum, 51, June 1. 1880. July: maxi- 
mum, 104, July 12, 1870; minimum, 64, July 10, 1804. August: maximum, 
100, August 4, 1800; minimum, 02, August 10. 1870. September: maxi- 
mum, 05, September 7, 1800; minimum. 40, September 25, 1887. October: 
maximum, 03, October 3, 1883; minimum, 30, October 27, 1808. Novem- 
ber: maximum. 82, November 23, 1800; minimum, 23, November 30. 
1872. December: maximum, 78. December 11, 1880; minimum, 13. De- 
cember 30, 1880. Absolute ranges, maximum, 104, on July 12, 1870; min- 
muin, 7, on February 14, 1899. 

MOISTURE. 

Mean dew-point, 8 a. m., 55 degrees. 

Mean dew-point, 8 p. m., 56 degrees. 

Mean annual dew-point, 56 degrees. 

The average annual dew-point, of Charleston, S. C, for twenty years, 
is 57 degrees. For the months: January, 41 degrees; February. 44; March, 
47; April, 54; May, 63; June, 70; July, 72; August, 73; September, 69; 
October, 59; November, 50; December, 44. 

Mean relative humidity, 8 a. m., 79 per cent. 

Mean relative humidity, 8 p. m., 76 per cent. 

Mean annual relative humidity, 77 per cent. 

The average annual relative humidity, of Charleston, S, C, for thirty 
years, is 76 per centum. For the months: January, 77 per cent.; Febru- 
ary, 75; March, 74; April, 73; May, 74; June, 76; July, 77; August, 79; 
September, 79; October, 77; November, 76; December, 76. 

Mean vapor pressure, 8 a. m., 0.484 inch. 

Mean vapor pressure, 8 p. m., 0.512 inch. 

Mean annual vapor pressure, 0.498 inch. 

WEATHER. 

Mean cloudiness (scale to 10 tenths), 8 a. m., 5.1 tenths. 

Mean cloudiness, 8 p. m., 5.0 tenths. 

Mean annual cloudiness, 5.2 tenths. 

The average annnal cloudiness, of Charleston, S. C, for thirty years, 
is 4.7 tenths. For the months: January, 5.0 tenths; February, 5.1; 
March, 4.6; April, 4.2; May, 4.2; June, 5.1; July, 5.3; August, 5.2; 
September, 4.8; October, 3.9; November, 4.2; December, 4.5. 

Greatest monthly cloudiness, 6.5 tenths, in January. 

Least monthly cloudiness, 4.5 tenths, in October- 
There were 88 clear days, distributed as follows: January, 2 days; 
February, 4; March, 2; April, 10; May, 8; June, 2; July, 8: August, 9; 



|h_' Mayor Smyth's Annual lici 

Seplen r, 12; November. 10; December. I i. 

Tlit' average annual number of clear days, of Charleston, S. ('.. for 
i Iiirt \ nl lis • Januan . i) days; February, 

10; March, 12: \pril. 13; May. 12; June, 8; -July, 8; August, 8; Septem- 
ber. 10 ibei . !:'.; D< cember, 13. 

There were 199 partly cloudy days, distributed as follows: January, 
17 din April. 1 J; May, 13; -Tune, '2(5; July. 20; 

Augusi :• }:',: November, 1 1 ; Deeember, 12. 

The average annual number of partly cloudy days, of Charleston, S. ('.. 
s, is ! 17 days. I'm the months: January, 12 days; Febru 
May, I !: lune. 1 1: duly. 16; August, 15; 
September, 12: October, 11; NovembeiylO; December, 10. 

There were . days, distributed as follows: January, 12 days; 

I ebruary. 10: " !()• June, 12: duly. 3; August. 6; 

September. 5; October, (i: November, 9; December, 5. 

The average annual number of cloudy dnys. of Charleston, S. C, for 
i hiit 10 days; February, 8; 

March. 8; April. 5 : May, 5; June, 8; duly. 7: August, 8; September. 8; 
October, 6; November, 7: Deeember, S. 

There were ."».'! days on which dense fog was observed, distributed as 
follows: Januan I 1 days; February,!}; March,."): August. 2; Septem- 
ber. 3; October. 3; November. 2; December. 1. 

SUNSHINE. 

There were 2069.7 hours of sunshine during 1903, distributed as fol- 

i, I ] 7.6; April, 208.9 ; 
May. 256.6; dun. 85.8; August, 275.1; September, 226.0; 

October. 222.6; November. 190.9; December, 222.4. 

The possible number of hour- of sunshine in any year is 4447. S hours 
(leap year, 1459.3 hours) as follows: January, 318.5 hours; February, 
318.3: (February, leap year, 319.8); March, 372.3; April. 390.5; May, 
130.7: dune, 1.28.7; duly, 437.2; August, 414.0: September. 371.4; Octo- 
ber. 351.5; November, 314.0; December, did. 7. 

The percentage of sunshine during the year 1903 was 61 per cent. For 
t he month-: January, 10 per cent; February, 42; March, 48; April, 69; 
May. 60; dune. 67; duly, 65; August, 66; September, 61; October, 63; 
November, (il ; December. 72. 

WIND. 

Prevailing direction, southwest. 17 per cent. 

Total annual movement, 95,353 miles. 

The average annual movement of wind, of Charleston, S. ('.. for thirty 
years, is 72.848 miles. For the months: January, 6,015 miles; February. 
6.013: March. 6.635; April, 6,570; May, 6,629; June, 6,066; July. 5,851; 
August. 5,599; September, 5.949: October, 6,203; November, 5.552; De- 
cember. 5,666. 



Health Department. 108 

Greatest monthly movement, 10,081 miles, in May. 

Least monthly movement, 6,354, in August. 

Greatest daily movement, 732, May 9. 

Least daily movement, 95, February 11. 

Highest velocity, 55 miles per hour, from the N. E., March 29. 

Number of times the wind was observed blowing (at 8 a. m. and 8 p. 
m., 1903), from the N.. 93 times or 13 per cent.; N. E., 127, or 17 per 
cent.; E., 83, or 11 per cent.; S. E., 45, or 6 per cent.; S. 109. or 15 per 
cent.; S. W., 125, or 17 per cent,; W., 80. or 11 per cent,; N. W.. G8, 
or 9 per cent.; calms, none, (0). 

The normal percentages of the wind-direction, of Charleston, S. C. 
for thirty years, are: N., 11 per cent,; K E., 16; E., 12; S. E., 7; S., 10; 
S. W., 22; *W., 11; N. W., 8; calms, 3. 

The monthty normal wind-directions, with percentages, of Charleston. 
S. C, for thirty years, are: January, N., 17 per cent.; February, S. W., 
21; March, S. W., 25; April, S. W., 30; May, S. W., 26; June, S. W., 30; 
July, S. W., 36; August, S. W., 26; September, N. E., 26; October, N. E., 
27; November, N. E., 20; December, N. E., 17. 

The average hourly wind velocity, for the year 1903, is 10.9 miles per 
hour. The mean hourly values, for the same period, are: 1 a. in., 9.6 
miles; 2 a. m., 9.7; 3 a. m., 9.5; 4 a, m., 9.6; 5 a, m., 9.8; 6 a. m., 9.6: 
7 a. in., 9.6; 8 a, m., 10.2; 9 a, m.. 11.1; 10 a. m., 11.6; 11 a, m., 11.7; 
12 noon, 12.1; 1 p. in., 12.6; 2 p. m., 13.0; 3 p. m., 13.4; 4 p. m.. 13.3; 5 p. 
m., 13.1; 6 p. m., 12.0; 7 p. m., 10.8; 8 p. m., 10.2; 9 p. m., 9.9; 10 p. m., 
9.6; 11 p. m., 9.8; 12 midnight, 9.7. 

The average annual hourly wind velocity, of Charleston, S. C, for 20 
years, is 8.6 miles. Mean hourly values: 1 a, m., 7.3 miles; 2 a, m., 7.1; 
3 a. m., 7.1; 4 a. m., 7.0; 5 a, m., 7.1; 6 a, m., 7.0; 7 a. m., 7.2; 8 a.m., 
7.0; 9 a. m., 8.4; 10 a. in., 8.9; 11 a, m., 9.4; 12 noon, 9.8; 1 p. m., 10.6; 
2 p. m., 10.1; 3 p. m., 11.3; 4 p. m., 11.2; 5 p. m., 11.0; 6 p. m., 9.9; 7 p. 
m., 8.7; 8 p. m., 7.9; 9 p. m., 7.6; 10 p. in., 7.5; 11 p. m., 7.4; 12 midnight. 
7.3. 

The greatest and least maximum velocities, for the months, of Charles- 
ton S. C, during the past 33 years, are as follows: January: greatest 
maximum velocity, 40 miles per hour, from the E., on January 30, 1878; 
least maximum velocity, 10 miles per hour, from the W., on January 6, 
1871. February: greatest maximum, 56, S. E., February 6, 1897; least 
maximum, 23, N. E., February 14, 1877. March: greatest maximum, 
55, N. E., March 29, 1903; least maximum, 16, E., March 28, 1872. April: 
greatest maximum, 66, S., April 20, 1893; least maximum, 16, N. E., 
April 15, 1871. May: greatest maximum, 53, N. E., May 9, 1903; least 
maximum, 22 E., May 16, 1885. June: greatest maximum, 54, E., June 16, 
1893; least maximum, 16, S. W., June 30, 1871. July: greatest maximum, 
43, N., July 4, 1902; least maximum, 16, E., July 28, 1872. August: 
greatest maximum, 96, E., August 28, 1893; least maximum, 18, E., August 
26, 1874. September: greatest maximum, 62, S., September 29, 1896; least 



I<»l Mayor Smyth's Annual Rerieir. 

maximum, 20, X. E., September 21, L871. October: greatesl maximum, 62, 
F... October 2, L898; least maximum, L2, X. E., October 21, 1871. Novem- 
ber: greatesl maximum, 46, E., November 14, 1888; least maximum, 16, 
X.. November 2. 1885. December: greatest maximum, 50, S. E., December 
17. 1888; least maximum, 12. \\ '.. December 4, 1871. Absolute maximum 
velocities: greatesl maximum velocity, 96 miles per hour from the E., on 
Augusl 28, 1893; least maximum, 10 miles per hour from the W., Janu- 
arv 6, 187 1. 

PRECIPITATION. 

Total rainfall, (melted snow, sleet and hail, included), 42.86 inches. 

Total depth of snowfall, 0.0 inches. 

Greatest monthly rainfall, 10.83 inches, in August. 

Least monthly rainfall, 0.06 inch, in April. 

Greatest rainfall in any 24 consecutve hours. 3.58 inches. August 
29th-30th. 

The average annual precipitation, of Charleston, S. C, for 30 years, 
is 54.85 inches. For the months: January, 3.72 inches; February, 3.41; 
March, 3.78: April, 3.39; May, 3.59; June, 5.62; July, 7.64; August, 7.43; 
September, 5.85; October, 4.15; November, 3.04; December, 3.23. 

There were 127 "rainy" days, (or days on which 0.01 inch, or more, of 
precipitation occurred), distributed as follows: January, 14 days; Feb- 
ruary, 11; March, 12; April, 7; May, 11; June, 17; July, 9; August, 14; 
September, 10; October, 6; November, 9; December, 7. 

'The average annual number of "rainy" days ,of Charleston, S. C, for 
30 years, is 11!). For the months : January, 10 days; February, 10; March, 
10; April, 8; May, 9; June. 11; July, 12; August, 14; September, 10; Oc- 
tober, 8; November. 8; December, 9. 

There were 02 thunderstorms, distributed as follows; January, 2 days; 
February. 1 : March. 1 ; April, 4; May. 3; June, 15; July. 11; August, 17; 
September, 6; October, 0; November, 2; December, 0. 

The average annual number of thunderstorms, of Charleston, S. C, 
for 20 years, is 49. For the months: January, 1; February, 1; March, 2; 
April, 3; May, 5; June, 10; July. 11; August, 10; September, 3; October, 
1 ; November. 1 ; December, 1. 

The extreme amounts of precipitation, for the months, of Charleston, 
S. ('., during the past 33 years, are as follows: January: greatest, 7.83 
inches, in 1878; least, 0.19 inch, in 1898. February: greatest, 10.45; in 
1S74: least. 0.51. in 189S. March, greatest. 9.78, in 1872; least, 0.50, in 
1887. April: greatest, 15.00, in 1877; least, 0.51, in 1892. May: greatest, 
8.62. in 1883; least, 0.48, in 1881. June: greatest, 16.50, in 1893; least, 
1.20, in 1891. July: greatest, 13.74, in 1874; least, 1.05, in 1875. August: 
greatest, lit. IS, in 1885; least, 0.40, in 1900. September: greatest, 11.89, 
in 1890; least. 0.40. in 1901. October: greatest, 14.32, in 1876; least, 0.01, 
in 1886. November: greatest, 7.54, in 1888; least, 0.33, in 1886. December: 
greatest, 7.91, in 1887; least, 0.03, in 1889. Absolute monthly maximum, 



Health Department. 105 

19.18 inches, in August, 1885; absolute monthly minimum, 0.01 inch, in 
October, 1886. 

The greatest depth of snowfall, for the months, of Charleston, S. C, 
during the past 18 years, (the record of snowfall measurements extend ^ 
ing back to the winter of 1884- '85 only), is as follows: January: greatest 
depth, 1.9 inches, occurred on January 18, 1893. February: greatest 
depth, 3.9 inches, occurred on February 12 and 13, 1899. March: greatest 
depth, trace, (less than 0.05 inch), occurred on March 2, 1890. November: 
greatest depth 0.0. December: greatest depth, 0.5 inch, occurred on De- 
cember 31, 1899. 

The last killing frost of spring occurred February 18. 

The last heavy frost of spring occurred February 22. 

The last light frost of spring occurred — none after the date of last 
heavy frost. 

The first light frost of autumn occurred October 26. 

The first heavy frost of autumn occurred — none subsequent to the date 
of first light, nor previous to th'e date of first killing frost. 

The first killing frost of autumn occurred November 19. 

L. N. JESUNOFSKY, Local Forecaster. 



10(5 M ////"> . 1 miiuil Rcr'n n\ 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF FIRE-MASTERS. 

Office Board of Fire-Masters, 
Charleston, S. C, January 1st, 1904. 

To flu Honorable the Mayor and City Council, 

of Charleston, S. C. : 

The Hoard of Fire-Masters respectfully submits the opera- 
tions of this Department for the year 100-), and its condition 
at this date, as contained in the annexed statements : 

The Force of the Department. 

Capacity and Make of Steamers. 

Condensed Expenses. 

Summary of Expenses by Companies. 

Inventory of Property and Location of Same. 

Inventory of Property Controlled by the Board of Fire- 
Masters, with Value of Same. 

Amounts Drawn from City Treasurer from 1st January, 
1882, to 31st December, 1908, and actual Cost of Maintain- 
ing the Department for Twenty-two Years. 

Record of Fires. 

Comparative Statement of Property at Kisk, Insurance 
and Loss. 

Report of Chief to the Board. 

Report of Superintendent Fire Alarm Telegraph to the 
Board. 

Report of Superintendent of Horses to the Board. 

FRANCIS S. RODGERS, 

Chairman Board Fire-Masters. 



Fire Department. 107 

THE FORCE OF THE DEPARTMENT DECEMBER 31st, 1903. 

99 Officers and Men. 
10 Steam Fire Engines. 

1 Double 80 H Gallon Tank Chemical Engine. 
11,700 Feet Hose, good. 

^1,750 Feet Hose Defective Rubber Lining 

2 Fuel Wagons. 

3 Carts. 

5 Hose Carriages. 
7 Hose Wagons. 

1 Aerial Truck, and Equipments. 

2 Trucks, and Equipments. 
21 Fire Extinguishers. 

30 Horses. 

3 Alarm Bells and a complete system of Fire Alarm Telegraph. 



108 Mat) 'or Smyth' 's Annnol Review. 

CONDENSED EXPENSES OF THE FIRE DEPARTMENT, FROM 
JANUARY 1st TO DECEMBER -Ust, 1903. 

Pay Rolls $ 40,11722 

Forage (5,120.10 

Wood and Coal 1,039.01 

Oil, Waste and Engine Supplies 379.93 

Repairs to Apparatus 539.16 

Repairs to Heaters 85.99 

Repairs to Houses 150.01 

House and Stable Utensils 90.41 

New No. 9 Steamer and Valves 4,281,21 

Five Horses 1,343.46 

Repairs to Harness 54.45 

Horse Shoeing 297.61 

Drugs and Hoof Packing for Horses 53.34 

Chemicals \ 88.84 

Telephones and Telegraph Clock 20100 

Printing and Stationery 89.18 

Saw Dust 72.96 

Ice for Stations 77.55 

Expense of Chief to International Convention, Atlantic City.... 40.75 

Gas for Lighting 501.15 

Current for Battery 45.65 

Relief for Injured Firemen at Standard Oil Co. Fire 300.00 

Total Expenses $52,977.98 

Less By Sale of Manure $ 29.30 

Less By Sale of Bags and Barrels 41.93 

Less By Sale of old Horses 235.00 

Less By Pumping out Cistern 10.00 

Less By Allowance for Lubricators 3.40 

Less By Sale of Old Hose 58.35 377.98 

Amount Drawn from City Treasurer $52,600.00 



Fire Department. 109 



CAPACITY AND MAKERS OF STEAMERS. 

Steamer No. 1.— Second size Silsby, Rotary, capacity 800 gallons per 
minute, built by Silsby Manufacturing Co., Seneca Falls, N. Y. Placed in 
service April, 1888. Weight loaded with 3 men 8,023 pounds. In service 
with Engine Co. No. 1. 

Steamer No. 2. — Old classification second size Amoskeag, doulle 
pumps, capacity 600 gallons per minute, built by Manchester Locomotive 
Works, Manchester, N. H., 1868. Rebuilt by same Company and placed in 
service January, 1893. Weight loaded with 3 men 7,580 pounds. In ser- 
vice with Engine Co. No. 2. 

Steamer No. 3. — Third size Clapp & Jones, single pumps, capacity 
350 gallons per minute, built by Clapp & Jones, and placed in service Jan- 
uary, 1883. Rebuilt by LaFrance Fire Engine Co., Elmira, N. Y., 1893. 
Weight when loaded with 3 men 7,110 pounds. In service with Combina- 
tion Co. No. 3. 

Steamer No. 4. — Third size Silsby, Rotary, capacity 600 gallons per 
minute. Built by Silsby Manufacturing Co., Seneca Falls, N. Y. Placed 
in service March, 1895. Weight loaded with 3 men 7,570 pounds. In re- 
serve, in charge of Engine Co. No. 4. 

Steamer No. 5. — Second size Clapp & Jones, double pumps, capacity 
600 gallons per minute. Built by Clapp &. Jones. Placed in service Feb- 
ruary, 1884. Weight loaded with 3 men 8,010 pounds. In reserve, in 
charge of Engine Co. No. 5. 

Steamer No. 6. — Second size Clapp & Jones, double pumps, capacity 
600 gallons per minute. Rebuilt by Nott Fire Engine Co., Minneapolis, 
Minn., and placed in service March, 1903. Weight loaded with 3 men 8,430 
pounds. In service with Engine Co. No. 6. 

Steamer No. 7.— Second size Silsby, Rotary, capacity 800 gallons per 
minute. Built by Silsby Manufacturing Co., Seneca Falls, N. Y. Placed 
in service May, 1890. Weight loaded with 3 men 8,050 pounds. In service 
with Engine Co. No. 7. 

Steamer No. 8. — Old classification first size Amoskeag, double pumps, 
capacity 700 gallons per minute. Built by Manchester Locomotive Works, 
1870. Rebuilt by American Fire Engine Co., Cincinnati, O., August, 1900. 
Weight loaded with 3 men 8,760 pounds. In service with Engine Co. No. 4. 

Steamer No. 9 — Second size Metropolitan, double pumps, capacity 
750 gallons per minute. Built by American Fire Engine Co., Seneca Falls, 
N. Y. and placed in service September, 1903. Weight loaded with 3 men 
9,315 pounds. In service with Engine Co. No. 5. 

Steamer No. 10. — Old classification third size Harp Tank, Amoskeag, 
single pump, capacity 350 gallons per minute. Built by Manchester Loco- 
motive Works, 1870. Rebuilt by same Company, January, 1893. Weight 
loaded with 3 men 5,485 pounds. In reserve, with Engine Co. 's Nos. 6 and 7. 



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Engine Co. 2, Wentworth St... 

Combination Co. 3, Meet'g St.. 

" " Aerial Trk 

" " " John St ... 

Engine Co. 4, Wentworth St... 

" " Queen Street 

" 5, Meeting Street... 

6, Cannon Street... 

Hook and Ladder No. 1, John 
Supply House, Queen Street... 
Headquarters, Meeting street 

Supply Wagon 

Chief's Buggy 

Fire Alarm Telegraph 

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New Horses bought during 190 

Old Horses sold " 
Horses died " 

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I I ■_! Mai/or Smyth's Annual Review. 

[NVENTORY OF PROPERTY ON HAND DECEMBER 31st, 1903, 
AND VALUE OF SAME. 



10 Steam Fire Engines at $4,000.00 40,000.00 

5 Hose Carriages at 250.00 1,250 00 

7 Hose Wagons at 400.00 2,800.00 

I Chemical Engine 2,000.00 

1 Aeriai Truck and Equipments 2,500.00 

1 Truck and Equipments 1,500.00 

1 Truck 500,00 

30 Horses 7,500.00 

11700 Feet Hose, good 5,850 00 

1750 Feet Hose, poor 250.00 

324 Feet Chemical Hose 100.00 

5 Wagons and Carts 625.00 

5 Extinguishers, Smoke Protectors, etc 670.00 

Beds and Bed Clothing 1,000.00 

Harness 2,050.00 

12 Engine Houses, Waterworks, Heaters and Heat- 
ing Apparatus 46,900.00 

Fire Alarm Tel. and Equipments, Two Bell Towers, 

and Three Bells 20,900.00 

Drill Equipments, Ladders and Life Net 420.00 

Total $141,815.00 



Fire Department. 113 

AMOUNTS DRAWN FROM CITY TREASURER FROM JANUARY 
1st, 1882 TO DECEMBER 31st, 1903. 

Real E-tate received from City without charge $10,000 00 

During the year 1882 $92,000 00 

1883 59,115 23 

1884 51,008 82 

1885 43 319 90 

1886 43,311 43 

1887 44,000 00 

1888 82,000 00 

1889 43,968 16 

1890 47,659 91 

1891 43,845 19 

1892 47,005 53 

1893 48,500 00 

1894 46,500 00 

1895 49,845 25 

1896 44,964 14 

1897 49,939 03 

1898 47,900 00 

1899 , ... 48,100 00 

1900 52,500 00 

1901 50,839 20 

1902 57,445 00 

1903 52,600 00 $1,146,366 79 

Total Amount $1,156,366 79 

Deduct property on hand as per: 

Inventory : $141,815.00 

Leaves Balance of $1,014,551.79 



Being actual cost of maintaining the Department for 22 years, or an 
expense of $46,206.90 per annum. 



II I 



M tyor Smyth's . I initial Revie 



COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF PROPERTY AT RISK, 

INSURANCE AND LOSS. 





6 


Property 




Loss on 


Loss on 






< 


at 


Insurance 


Real 


Personal 


Total Loss. 




54-1 

o 


Risk. 




Estate. 


Property. 




fc 












L882 


34 


$ 293,500 00 


% 106,205 00 


$ 12,539 09 


$ 20,087 52 


$ 32,626 61 


1883 


72 


1,229,885 41 


1,112,350 00 


50,261 19 


243,699 11 


293.960 30 


1884 


43 


412,163 00 


305,238 54 


31,665 00 


70,494 98 


102 159 98 


1 885 


50 


394,802 11 


251,100 00 


5,103 80 


22,359 79 


27,463 59 


1880 


57 


431,774 43 


356,024 43 


46,325 55 


62,216 09 


108,541 04 


1887 


43 


1,191,577 00 


1,125,025 00 


5,081 oo 


42,455 17 


47,536 17 


isss 


35 


1,256,991 88 


1,241 685 00 


17,127 00 


86,042 88 


103,169 88 


L889 


52 


941,975 00 


898,555 00 


17,413 00 


50,475 00 


67,888 00 


L890 


38 


521,275 00 


341,850 00 


16,431 00 


31,128 00 


47,556 00 


181)1 


54 


1.549,725 00 


1,420,350 00 


12 086 50 


27,928 17 


40,014 67 


1892 


00 


380,887 00 


243,262 00 


42,102 40 


20, i 189 25 


63,091 65 


1893 


50 


1 306, 400 79 


1,148,958 40 


21,336 41 


119,0S4 73 


140,421 14 


1894 


81 


499,942 00 


267,540 00 


35,264 20 


31,184 50 


66,448 70 


1 895 


80 


811,561 12 


568 32! 12 


14.909 20 


16,895 77 


31 804 97 


1896 


81 


387,590 51 


212 442 51 


11,318 85 


25,001 60 


36,320 45 


1897 


78 


1,271,817 00 


803,900 00 


9,284 00 


11 982 83 


21,266 83 


1898 


121 


784,111 00 


514 975 00 


14,78* 80 


17,695 87 


32,484 67 


1899 


94 


456 500 00 


320,750 00 


17,749 21 


11,826 50 


29.575 71 


1900 


118 


371,360 00 


213,700 00 


11,237 70 


6,355 17 


17 592 87 


1901 


151 


1,025,122 42 


260 425 00 


33,199 49 


33,610 86 


66,810 35 


1902 


145 


663,020 00 


412,325 00 


18,998 43 


13,381 77 


32,380 20 


1903 


189 


579,705 00 
16,761,673 70 


293,755 00 


13,065 75 


15,784 60 


28,850 35 




12,418,737 09 


457 287 57 


980 677 16 


1,437,964 73 



Average for 22 Years 

Property at Risk #761,894 26 

Insurance 564,488 05 

Loss on Real Estate $20 785 80 

Loss on Personal Property 45,030 78 

Average Loss per Annum $65 362 03 




O. G. Marjenhoff, 
Chief of Fire Department. 



Fire Department. 115 

REPORT OF CHIEF OF FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

Charleston, Jan. 11, 1904. 
To the Chairman and Board of Fire-Masters : 

Gentlemen — I hereby tender this, my tenth annual 
report on the working of the Fire Department for the year 
ending December 31, 1903, being the twenty-second annual 
report since the organization of the Paid Department. The 
Department answered 189 alarms in the course of the year, 
being 44 more than last year. 

Four of these alarms were calls for assistance out of the 
city, and were promptly answered by men and apparatus. 
Twenty false alarms were turned in by mischievous parties. 

Bell alarms 94; telephone alarms, 80; verbal alarms 15. 

With the exception of very few cases alarms were given 
with promptness, and by the quick responses of the Depart- 
ment, and the perfect working of the Fire Alarm System, the 
losses have been kept down below last year in spite of the 
greater number of fires. 

The loss of $6,000 on the steamer Clarence ought properly 
to be deducted from the city loss, because being adrift when 
the alarm was given, and out of reach when Department ar- 
rived, nothing could be done to save anything of it. 

The figures for losses and insurance are as follows : 

Total Insurance $293,755 00 

Total Loss 28,850 35 

Insurance Loss 18,953 35 

Loss over Insurance 9,897 00 

Average loss during my time of ten years, $33,023.66, being 
an average of 55 cents per capita per annum. 

As usual every year, there were several fires with very 
small losses of which the Department did not receive notice. 

It will be seen that there were twenty false alarms sent in 
by mischievously inclined parties, two to whom the testimony 
pointed very strongly, have been arrested ; one is under bond 
for the next term of the Court of General Sessions, and the 



llii Mat/or Smyth'* Annual Rerictn. 

case of the other resulted in a mistrial, and may be taken up 
again a1 the nexl term of the court, The penalty being terms 
in the penitentiary, it is hoped niter one or more have been 
convicted the nuisance will stop and the danger therefrom to 
life and property abate. 

DEPARTMENT BUILDINGS. 

The main buildings are in good repair, but need painting. 
The outbuildings at the Central Station and Cannon Streets, 
need sills and other repairs, and the waterworks arrange- 
ments need a general change and overhauling. 

APPARATUS. 

A new second size Metropolitan steamer has been received 
in September and placed in service with Engine No. 5. 

The boilers of steamers Nos. 4 and 5 have to be renewed 
soon, but as they appear to be in safe condition, I do not 
consider it necessary to ask for special appropriation for 
same this year. 

All the other steamers are in good condition, and all are in 
good working order. 

The heaters which have been in service for over sixteen 
years are beginning to give out, and two may have to be 
renewed. 

HORSES. 

Thirty horses are in the service, some of which will have to 
be renewed during this year. 

Five old ones were sold and two died. 
Five new ones were purchased. 

HOSE. 

All hose that has been in use over three years has been 
tested as usual to 150 pounds pressure. This system has prov- 
en ver} 7 effective in eliminating the bursting of hose at crit- 
ical times at fires, and thereby contributes much to the cause 
of our small fire loss. 



Fire Department. 



117 



The present amount on hand is : 

New, not yet used 4,000 feet 

New and good in use 7,700 feet 

Defective rubber lining stands 100 lbs 1,620 feet 

Total 13,320 feet 

DISCIPLINE. 

The general discipline has been good, all alarms have been 
answered promptly and fires quickly subdued. 

FIRE DUTIES PERFORMED BY COMPANIES. 





Time on 
Duty. 


Engine 
Worked. 


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6 


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6 


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Hrs 


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152 
44 
44 




13 
3 
1 






11 






Engine No. 1 


52 
52 


41 

10 


13 
5 


34 
41 


31 

24 


7,650 
11,200 


120 






Engine No. 2 

Comb. Co. 3 stmr 











Chemical Eng... 


82 
8 


24 

25 


18 


57 


40 


7,500 


158 
21 




36 


718 
125 


45 

7 


66 

7 




49 


Hose Wag. No. 3 

Engine No. 4 

Engine No. 5 










51 

62 
48 
52 
73 


52 
20 
59 
20 
4 


16 

12 

6 

5 


26 

2 

28 

12 


25 
9 
19 
23 


11,600 
4,550 
8,450 

11,700 


45 
56 
73 
53 
105 














Engine No. 6 




5 

"57 












Engine No. 7 




3,020 


"l42 


121 


"47" 
















Total 


484 


15 


59 


23 


171 


62,650 


* 




11f» 


3,983 


194 


•>05 


47 


49 























Working Time of Steamers 59 hours and 23 minutes. 

Estimated number of Gallons Water used, averaging 250 Gallons per minute, 
with 1% Nozzle, 890,750 Gallons. 
*Fire Alarms, 189. 

CHEMICALS USED. 

Chemical Engine 49 Tanks 

3-Gallon Extinguishers 95 Charges. 

6-Gallon Extinguishers 20 Charges. 

RESIGNATIONS. 

July 18 — Callman S. T. Roberts, Engine No. 7. 

DEATHS. 
Nov. 20— Driver J. Sanders, Engine No. 4. 



118 Mtnjur Snt'/ih's Annual Review. 

( \\ S V A I IV 1 US TO FIREMEN. 

Jan. 1!> Box 164, Callman I*. V. Lynch, Engine No. 2 burnt 

by explosion at Standard Oil Company's plant, 

disabled 1 hree weeks. 
Callman (>. II. Zwingmann, Engine No. 3, burnt 

and knee rap wrenched, same fire, disabled ten 

weeks. 
Callman B. C. Jenkins, Truck 1, burnt at same fire, 

disabled ten weeks. 
June 8— Box 8, Callman E. Jones, Engine Company No. 2, 

falling off ladder, disabled five days. 
June 29 — Callman F. Vogt, Engine No. 1, while working at 

his occupation, fell with bidder and broke both 

legs, disabled ever since 
July 24— Helper W. II. Lockwood, Engine Company No. 5, 

overcome by heat hauling sawdust, disabled nine 

weeks. 

CASUALTIES TO CITIZENS AT FIRES. 

Jan. I:] — Telephone alarm, child Mary Jane Patterson, col- 
ored Fatally burned. 
May 3— Box 623, Catherine Lance, colored, fatally burnt. 
July 4— Box 181, J. Larsen, white, badly hurt. 

LIVE STOCK BURNT. 

June 6— Box 813, horse burned to death. 

Nov. 22 — Box 313, Ik use and mule burned to death. 

THE CONSOLIDATED EMERGENCY WAGON. 

Foreman S. L. Welsh and his Linemen of the Consolidated 
Railway Company, have again responded promptly to every 
alarm and are at all times ready to protect the firemen from 
dangerous wires. 

Six taps to cut out light and power circuits were given 
after alarms several times during the year as tests and re- 
sponded to at the power house in a few seconds. Upon three 
taps signal, current was turned on again as promptly. 



Fire Department. 119 

BUILDING INSPECTION. 

Chimneys and hearths in forty-one new buildings were 
passed upon as properly built. 

Twenty-three chimneys were not properly built, and own- 
ers changed same to comply with law. 

Three chimneys and hearths reported as unsafe in old 
buildings were condemned, and owners notified. Repairs with 
shingles were found on five roofs, and owners made to com- 
ply with laws. 

CONCLUSION. 

The officers and members of the Police Department de- 
serve much credit for their vigilance at night in giving 
alarms promptly, and I wish to tender my thanks to them 
for the prompt manner in which they cooperate with the Fire 
Department on all occasions of fires and alarms. 

To the Chairman and the members of your board I again 
beg to express my thanks for the continued confidence placed 
in me, and for your continued efforts to keep everything 
appertaining to the Department at its highest efficiency. 

Very respecfully, 

O. G. MARJENHOFF, 
Chief Fire Department. 



1*20 Mayor Synyttis Annual Review. 

Quickest time for J'ull companies of twelve men each, to 
answer roll call at fires or alarms from first stroke of gongs: 

DAY TIME, 6 A. M. TO 6 P. M. 

Engine 1.— November 9, box 352, at 4:35 p. m., 10 minutes. 

Engine 2.— December 25, box 141, at 2:07 p. m. 7 8 minutes. 

Engine 3. April L8, box 532, at 1:58 p. m., 10 minutes. 

Engine 4. — January 12, box 614, at 10:09 a. m., 10 min- 
utes. 

Engine 5. — April 5, box 523, at 10:54 a. m., 9 minutes. 

Engine 6.— April 5, box 55, at 10:18 a. m., 10 minutes. 

Engine 7. — November 20, box 731, at 8:56 a. m., 10 min- 
utes. 

Truck 1. — April 5, box 523, at 10:54 a. m., 5 minutes. 

NIGHT TIME, 6 P. M. TO 6 A. M. 

Engine 1. — May 19, box 81, at 3:40 a. m., 5 minutes! 
Engine 2.— June 7, box 525, at 6 a. in., 9 minutes. 
Engine 3.- December 31, box 324, at 9:53 p. m., 7 minutes. 
Engine 4. — December 15, box 125, at 11 :08 p. in. ,7 minutes. 
Engine 5. — February 6, box 523, at 1:14 a. in., 9 minutes. 
Engine 6. — March 25, box 444, at 6:21 p. m., 9 minutes. 
Engine 7. — November 22, box 313, at 11:29 p. m., 7 min- 
utes. 

Truck 1.— April 19, box 81, at 8:03 p. m., 9 minutes. 

RECORD OF ATTENDANCE AT BELL ALARMS. 

Chief, did not hear 2, leave of absence 5, sick 4, attended 82. 
Assistant Chief, leave of absence 1, attended 92. 
Chief's Driver, attended 93. 
Supply Wagon Driver, attended 93. 

ENGINE NO. 1. -PERMANENT FORCE. 

Engineer B. E. Bicaise, leave of absence 2, attended 91. 

Assistant Engineer T. E. Watson, attended 93. 

Driver C. Brown, attended 93. 

Driver J. Gibbes, attended 93. 

Helper J. Ladson, did not hear 3, attended 90. 



Fire Department. 121 

CALL FORCE. 

Foreman H. D. Rambke did not hear 2, sick 2, attended 89. 

Callman J. F. Cullen, did not hear 1, sick 4, attended 88. 

Callman - did not hear 3, sick 7, attended 83. 

Callman J. Jones, did not hear 4, sick 6, attended 83. 

Callman 0. R. I. Vicadomini, did not hear 2, leave of ab- 
sence 1, sick 4, attended 86. ■ 

Callman W. H. Brandes, did not hear 3, leave of absence 
1. attended 89. 

Callman J. Fitzgerald, did not hear 1, leave of absence 
1. attended 91. 

Company attendance 95% per cent. 

ENGINE NO. 2. -PERMANENT FROCE. 

Engineer E. H. Lloyd, sick 4, attended 89. 

Assistant Engineer M. J. Grace, did not hear 1, attended 92. 

Driver William Webb, attended 93. 

Driver F. Gibbes, did not hear 1, attended 92. 

Helper S. Brown, did not hear 1, attended 92. 

CALL FORCE. 

Foreman E. J. Lacassagne, attended 93. 

Callman M. Barry, did not hear 1, attended 92. 

Callman P. F. Lynch, leave of absence 1, sick 8, attended 
84. 

Callman G. F. Fosberry, did not hear 3, attended 90. 

Callman J. Moore, attended 93. 

Callman E. Jones, did not hear 2, leave of absence 1, sick 
3, attended 87. 

Callman E. H. Droze, attended 93. 

Company attendance 97 1-2 per cent. 

ENGINE NO. 3.-PERMANENT FORCE. 

Foreman M. Morris, did not hear 1, attended 92. 

Tillerman A. Myers, attended 93. 

Tillerman G. Moore, sick 1, attended 92. 

Tillerman T. Daggett, leave of absence 1, attended 92. 

Driver S. Dunmyjer, did not hear 2, attended 91. 

Driver H. Simmons, did not hear 1 3 attended 92. 



! _'_' Mai/or Smyth's Annual Rc.rinr. 

CALL FORCE. 

Callman 1'. Mandich, did not hear 4, Leave of absence 1, a1 
tended 88. 

Callraai) G. Zwingmann, did not hear 3, sick 5, attended 85. 

Callman I). Melfi, attended 93. 

Callman \V. Castillo, did not hear 6, Leave of absence 1, at- 
tended 86. 

Company attendance 97% per cent. 

ENGINE NO. 4.— PERMANENT FORCE. 

Engineer J. P. Sullivan, sick 4, attended 89. 
Assistant Engineer G. F. Rose, attended 93. 
Driver - — , did not hear 2, attended 91. 

Driver C. R. Bates, attended 93. 
Helper J. Fraser, did not hear 2, attended 91. 

CALL FORCE. 

Foreman A. J. Jager, leave of absence 1, attended 92. 
Callman W. G. Jones, did not hear 7, attended 86. 
Callman J. T. Keckley, did not hear 2, attended 91. 
Callman J. J. Finnegan, did not hear 1, leave of absence 1, 
attended 91. 

Callman R. L. Alderson, did not hear 2, attended 91. 
Callman A. J. Axson, sick 2, attended 91. 
Callman L. J. Burmester, did not hear 2, attended 91. 
Company attendance 97 1 /> per cent. 

ENGINE NO. 5. -PERMANENT FORCE. 

Engineer B. W. Donnell, attended 93. 

Assistant Engineer William Roberts, did not hear 3, at- 
tended 90. 

Driver R. Wardlaw, did not hear 1, attended 92. 

Driver D. Bowman, attended 93. 

Helper W. H. Lockwood, sick 1, attended 92. 

CALL FORCE. 

Foreman W. F. McGinniss, did not hear 2, leave of absence 
3, attended 88. 
Callman M. J. Nolen, did not hear 2, attended 91. 



Fire Department. 123 

Callman R. M. Sigwald, did not hear 2, attended 91. 

Callman T. E. Knickmeyer, did not hear 2, attended 91. 

Callman J. J. Bennett, did not hear 1, sick 2, attended 90. 

Callman J. R. Lewis, did not hear 1, leave of absence 1, 
attended 91. 

Callman G. H. Benedikt, did not hear 2, leave of absence 
2, sick 5, attended 84. 

Company attendance 97% per cent. 

ENGINE NO. 6. -PERMANENT FORCE. 

Engineer T. W. Halsall, did not hear 1, sick 1, attended 91. 
Assistant Engineer J. H. Shriver, leave of absence 3, at- 
tended 90. 

Driver E. Hills, sick 1, attended 92. 

Driver W. J. Jones, did not hear 1, attended 92. 

Helper H. Guilford, did not hear 1, attended 92. 

CALL FORCE. 

Foreman A. Axson, leave of absence 4, attended 89. 

Callman J. A. Young, did not hear 1, leave of absence 1, 
sick 9, attended 82. 

Callman E. Begley, did not hear 3, leave of absence 2, sick 
2, attended 86. 

Callman H. F. Behrens, did not hear 1, leave of absence 1, 
sick 1, attended 90. 

Callman A. L. Knickmeyer, leave of absence 1, attended 92. 

Callman J. E. Smith, did not hear 5, leave of absence 1, 
sick 2, attended 85. 

Callman R. Dohrmann, did not hear 3, attended 90. 

Company attendance 95 per cent. 

ENGINE NO. 7.-PERMANENT FORCE. 

Engineer W. H, Sigwald, did not hear 1, attended 92. 

Assistant Engineer G. J. Veronee, leave of absence 3, at- 
tended 90. 

Driver A. McKinley, did not hear 1, attended 92. 

Driver R. Swinton, did not hear 1, leave of absence 2, sick 
1, attended 89. 

Helper S. Waiters, did not hear 1, attended 92. 



I - I M'l'i-n- Snii/llt's Am"//// lie vie io. 

CALL FORCE. 

Foreman E. M. Droze, did qo1 hear i, attended 92. 

Callman II. II. Radgeway, did not hear ^, leave of absence 

3, attended ST. 

Callman J. 1*. Keegan, did not hear 2, leave of absence 1, 
attended 90. 

Callman A. W. Rose, did not hear 1, attended 92. 
Callman G. M. Worrell, attended 93. 
Callman 0. Schneider, did not hear 3, attended 90. 
Callman — , did not hear 3, attended 90. 

Company attendance 97% per cent. 

TRUCK NO. 1.— PERMANENT FORCE. 

Tillerman J. J. O'Bryen, did not hear 1, attended 92. 

Assistant Tillerman J. L. Shecut, did not hear 1, attended 
92. 

Driver II. C. Ford, did not hear 1, leave of absence 1, at- 
tended 91. 

Helper J. W. Marshall, did not hear 3, attended 90. 

CALL FORCE. 

Foreman W. G. Fridie, did not hear 2, leave of absence 5, 
attended 86. 

Callman A. II. Miller, did not bear 2, attended 91. 

Callman C. B. Jenkins, did not bear 1, sick 13, attended 79. 

Callman J. A. Nell, did not hear 2, attended 91. 

Callman G. M. Mears, leave of absence 2, attended 91. 

Callman A. H. Kiddell, did not hear 1, leave of absence 3, 
sick 1, attended 88. 

Callman J. H. Green, leave of absence 2, attended 91. 

Company attendance 96 per cent. 



I _' I Maijot' Smyth's Annual Reel t 

CALL FORCE. 

Foreman E. M. Droze, did not hear i, attended 92. 

Callman 11. II. Ridgeway, did not hear '■'>, Leave of absence 
3, a1 tended 87. 

Callman J. 1*. Keegan, did not hear 2, leave of absence 1. 
attended 90. 

Callman A. W. Rose, did not hear 1, attended 92. 

Callman G. M. Worrell, attended 93. 

Callman 0. Schneider, did not hear 3, attended 90. 

Callman — , did not hear 3, attended 90. 

Company attendance 97% per cent. 

TRUCK NO. 1. -PERMANENT FORCE. 

Tillerman J. J. O'Bryen, did not hear 1, attended 92. 

Assist aid Tillerman J. L. Shecut, did not hear 1, attended 
92. 

Driver II. C. Ford, did not hear 1, leave of absence 1, at- 
tended 91. 

Helper J. W. Marshall, did not hear :*, attended 90. 

CALL FORCE. 

Foreman AY. (I. Fridie, did not hear 2, leave of absence 5, 
attended 86. 

Callman x\. H. Miller, did not hear 2, attended 91. 

Callman C. B. Jenkins, did not hear 1, sick 13, attended 79. 

Callman J. A. Nell, did not hear 2, attended 91. 

Callman G. M. Mears, leave of absence 2, attended 91. 

Callman A. H. Kiddell, did not hear 1, leave of absence 3. 
sick 1, attended 88. 

Callman J. H. Green, leave of absence 2, attended 91. 

Company attendance 96 per cent. 



INSER 

FOLD-0 

OR MA 

HERE! 



Fire Department. 125 

REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT OF FIRE ALARM 
TELEGRAPH TO THE BOARD. 

Charleston, Jan. 11, 1904. 

To the Chairman and Board of Fire- Masters : 

Gentlemen — I beg to tender this, my report for the year 
ending December 31, 1903. 

LINES TRANSFERRED TO TELEPHONE POLES. 

Ashley Avenue, from Beaufain to Sash and Lumber fac- 
tory. 

Queen, from Franklin to Rutledge Avenue. 
Franklin, from Queen to Broad. 
Laurens, between East Bay and Concord. 
Lucas, between Calhoun and Mill. 
Smith, from Wentworth to Calhoun. 
St. Philip, from Wentworth to Warren. 
Burn's Lane and King. 
George, between Anson and Meeting. 
Coming and Wentworth. 

NEW POLES PUT UP. 

Hasell and East Bay. 
Franklin and Queen. 
Ogier and Vanderhorst. 
Cannon and St. Philip. 
St. Philip and Warren. 
Chalmers and Church. 
Halsey's Mill. 

Wentworth east of Meeting. 
East Bay and Wentworth. 
North Commercial Wharf. 
Amherst and Hanover. 
Amherst and Nassau. 
Magazine and Archdale. 

Forty old poles taken down where lines transferred. 
Boxes transferred to new poles all with new wires from 
lines to boxes. 



l-'» Mayor Smyth's Annual Review, 

Boxes 343, 67, L36, 272, 181, 452, 616, 731, 162. 

New boxes put up and connected to lines, using aboul 
one mile of new wire for same and 9 new poles. 

Box 724, ( larolina and Tracy Streets. 

Box 811, Hampton Park, expenses except labor for these 
two boxes paid by Park Commissioners and ( !ity. 

New wire, Broad Street, Mast Bay to State. 

Headquarters yard, Halsey's Mil] yard. 

Lucas Street, Franklin Street, St. Philip Street. 

Pinckney, from East Bay to Linemans residence, on Anson 
Street, ( Vntral Station on Went worth Street, using about one 
mile of wires for these places. 

Lines changed from west to east side of St. Philip, from 
( Ireen to Vanderhorst Street. 

Lines have been cleared of trees on several Streets. 

Slacks in wires cut out on Beaufain, Calhoun, Laurens, 
Line, Franklin, Green, Queen, Rutledge and St. Philip 

St reels. 

Breaks on lines repaired caused by lightning, etc., Church 
south of Cumberland. 
Lucas at Halsey's Mill. 

Calhoun, west of Ashley, also east of Ashley. 
Bull and Smith, President and Spring 1 . 
Burns Lane and Meeting Street. 

CROSSES WITH OTHER WIRES CLEARED. 

Beaufain and St. Philip, Liberty and St. Philip. 

Morris and St. Philip, Bull and Ashley Avenue. 

Meeting, opposite Power-house. 

Several cross arms, brackets, insulators, pins, break arms, 
etc., were renewed and all defects in lines repaired promptly 
in all parts of city. 

REPAIRS TO APPARATUS AND BOXES. 

Puses burnt from power line, one lamp in switchboard 
burnt, six fuses in switchboard, one in fuse board. 

Wire on magnets in bell, Meeting Street. 

Gongs in Engine houses No. 2, No. 1, Truck and Consol- 
idated Railway Emergency Wagon. 



Fire Department. 127 

Bell at Orphan House, new socket on rod. 

Cannon Street, bell bolt in spring arm. 

Headquarters bell, new magnets. 

Repeater cleaned and plates in switchboard redressed 
i'rom burnt scale. 

Four new cells placed in battery for extended lines. 

Boxes 812, 626, 67, 66, 414, 731, 721 and 83, burnt by 
lightning, repaired. 

Boxes 154, 731, 414, 417, and 93, cleaned and adjusted. 

Signals on bells during the year: 

Cold wave signals 6 

Twelve noon signals 312 

Test signals 155 

Fire alarms 94 

Total .. .. 567 

Number of instruments on each circuit: 

Number of Circuits. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. Total 

Alarm boxes 17 19 21 16 16 17 106 

Gongs.. ., 5 5 5 1 3 1 20 

Indicators 1 1 1 .. .. 1 4 

Bells 2 .. 1 3 

Total 23 25 27 19 19 20 133 

During the past year all alarms have been perfect ; all 
breaks and defects, have been repaired promptly without ex- 
pense for labor. 

Lineman J. Fitzgerald deserves credit for his promptness 
and willingness, even working at times in great danger, to 
repair breaks on lines. 

The helpers also deserve credit for their work on lines 
during the past year. 

Very 5 respectfully, 

B. E. BICAISE, 
Superintendent Fire Alarm Telegraph. 



Mil,/,,,- Sno/th's Annual Rcrictr. 

REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT OF HORSES TO THE 

BOARD. 

< Jharleston, Jan. 1 1, L904. 

To tin Chairman and Board of Fire- Masters : 

Gentlemen 1 respectfully submit herewith my annual re 
port for the year ending December 31, 1903: 

ATTENDANCE TO HORSES. 

Engine No. 1— 
January 30, Engine horse, Lung fever. 
May 28, Engine horse, indigestion. 
October 10, Engine horse, indigestion. 

Pmgine No. 2 — 

January 23, Engine horse, lameness. 
January 5, Engine horse, cough and cold. 
June 1, Engine horse, appetite. 
June 8, Engine horse, indigestion. 
October 14th, Engine horse, cold. 

Engine No. 3 — 

April 17, Engine horse, cough and cold. 

July 2, Engine horse, lameness. 

August 15, Engine horse, dislocation stifle bone 

November 17, Engine horse, lameness. 

Engine No. 5— 

January 6, Engine horse, colic. 

February 18, Engine horse, cough and cold. 

February 18, Hose Wagon horse, cough and cold. 

May 18, Engine horse, colic. 

June 16, Engine horse, died of colic. 

July 30, Engine horse, sore foot. 

December 28, Engine horse, cold. 

Engine No. 6 — 

February 5, Engine horse, dislocation stifle bone. 
June 10, Engine horse, appetite. 



Fire Department. 129 

Engine No. 7— 

January 6, Engine horse, coughs and cold. 

January 6, Hose Wagon horse, coughs and cold. 

April 7, Engine horse, appetite. 

June 8, Engine horse, overcome by heat. 

July 18, Wagon horse, died, inflammation of kidneys. 

Truck No. 1— 

February 27, one horse, colic. 

June 2, one horse, colic. 

June 6, one horse, sore mouth. 

August 7, one horse, colic. 

September 10, one horse, bruises, not yet recovered. 

September 27, one horse, dropsy. 

September 28, one horse, colic. 

October 4, one horse, lameness. 

October 20, one horse colic. 

October 21, one horse, nail in foot. 

November 23, one horse lameness. 

November 24, one horse, stiffness of joints. 

December 9, one horse, colic. 

December 11, one horse, appetite. 

Supply House— 

March 18, Fire Al. horse, nail in foot. 
July 7, Chief's horse, lameness. 
October 10, Chief's horse, appetite. 
October 15, supply horse, lameness. 

I visit the houses every twenty-four or forty-eight hours 
and superintend the buying of horses and the selecting of 
feed for the Department. 

Very respectfully, 

MICHAEL HOGAN. 
Superintendent of Horses. 



130 Mayor Smyth's Animal Review. 



REPORT OF CHIEF OF POLICE 



Central Station, Office Chief of Police, 

Charleston, S. C, January Lst, L904. 

To the Honorable the Mayor and City Council of Charleston : 
Gentlemen — Herewith I respectfully present for your 
consideration my Annual Report of the Police Department 
tor the year ending December 31st, 1903. 

STRENGTH OF THE FORCE. 

1 have endeavored to maintain the discipline of the force, 
and the same has been kept at its full strength, viz: 

One Chief. Three Detectives. 

Three Lieutenants. Eighty-five Privates. 

Two Orderly Sergeants. Four Gate Sentinels. 

Eight Line Sergeants. Two Daymen. 

One Chief of Detectives. Five Drivers. % 

One City Electrician. 

HEALTH OF THE DEPARTMENT. 

The health of the Department has been unusually good, 
and free from epidemics of any character. 

It is id y painful duty, however, to announce two (2) deaths, 
as follows : 

Driver M. 0. Brown, 6.40 o'clock p. m. February 17th, 
1903, died suddenly while on duty in the stables on Hudson 
street. Brown was a hostler for many years at the police 
station and by his strict attention to duty gave general satis- 
faction. 

Private Michael McMahon, 8 o'clock a. m. July 4th, 1903, 
died at his residence corner Coming and Radcliffe streets. 

Private McMahon was an efficient member of the Depart- 
ment, during his latter years of service he was assigned to 




W. A. Boyle, 
Chief of Police. 



Beport of Chief of Police. 131 

duty at the Enston Home, and his courteous and manly per- 
formance of all duties assigned him while stationed there, 
won for him the high regard of the inmates of the Institution. 
In addition to the above, one (1) acting sergeant, thirteen 
(13) privates and one (1) driver were painfully injured while 
in the performance of their duties; and six (6) sergeants, two 
(2) acting sergeants, thirty-seven (37) privates and one (1) 
driver were taken suddenly ill while on duty, and allowed to 
leave their divisions and posts. 

VACANCIES AND APPOINTMENTS. 

During the past year the following vacancies have occured, 
and the following appointments made to fill them: 

Resigned without charges 6 Privates. 

Resigned without charges . 1 Driver. 

Resigned under charges 2 Privates. 

Discharged 7 Privates. 

Vacancy caused by promotion 1 Sergeant. 

Vacancy caused by promotion 1 Private. 

Vacancy caused by death 1 Private. 

Vacancy caused by death 1 Driver. 

Total 20 

APPOINTMENTS. 

Sergeants 1 

Privates 17 

Drivers 2 

Total 20 



132 



Mayor Smyth's Annual Review. 



Statement of Charges Preferred Against Members of the 
Force, the Disposition of Charges, Etc. 



CHARGES. 



Disposition. 



-a 

• a> 

-a tt) 

. I a -s 

i I \M 
^ « ta 



Asleep on post 3 Privates 

Absent from roll call 7 Privates 

Absent without leave 3 Privates 

Assault 3 Privates 

Allowing prisoner to escape 1 Sergeant 

Allowing prisoner to escape 1 Private 

Being oil' post 15 Privates 

Conduct unbecoming an officer 9 Privates 

Careless driving. ..... 1 Driver 

Continuous absence from duty 2 Privates 

Disobedience of orders 1 Private 

Failing to pull boxes , 5 Privates 

Failing to pull boxes on schedule time 4 Privates 

Failing to respond to an alarm of tire 1 Private 

Failing to have bed dressed for inspection. ... 1 Private 
Having prisoner at Court and failing to prose- 
cute 2 Privates 

Intoxication 4 Privates 

Improperly searching prisoner 1 Private 

Leaving posts before being properly relieved. 11 Privates 

Leaving city without permission 1 Private 

Leaving stables without permission 1 Driver 

Neglect of duty 12 Privates 

Neglect of duty 1 Driver 

Refusing to make an arrest 2 Privates 

Sitting down while on post 4 Privates 

Smoking while in uniform 3 Privates 

Tardy in meeting relief 3 Privates 

Unnecessarily tiring pistol 2 Privates 

Violation of order relative to sick reports 15 Privates 

Wearing citizen's dress without permission. . . 4 Privates 

Total 123 



1 


3 






5 

2 




1 


1 




5 


9 




2 


7 




1 


1 




2 


:: 




2 

1 ' ' 


2 

l 
1 




1 


1 

1 

1 

11 


i 


5 


1 
1 




1 


i 
1 




1 

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2 




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9 
4 




29 
1 


85 


2 



1 

1 

11 
1 
1 

12 

1 

2 
4 
3 

:; 

2 

15 

4 

123 



Report of Chief of Police. 133 

The completion of the new stables erected corner King and 
Hudson streets, has enabled us to move the officers' horses 
across the street, and the room formerly occupied by them 
has been utilized by the erection often (10) new cells, adding 
much to the comfort needed for prisoners. 

A part of the money appropriated for the purchase of 
horses has been judiciously expended, and both the sergeants' 
horses and those for the patrol wagons are in good shape. 

EXECUTION OF THE VAGRANT LAW. 

The vagrant law has been rigidly enforced, and the special 
squad has performed good and efficient service, as the daily 
additions to the chain gang will show. 

Number of arrests for vagrancy, for year 1903 300 

Number of arrests for vagrancy, for year 1902 295 

Increase in number of arrests 5 

The Department is under obligations to Recorder Theo. 
D. Jervey for the way in which he has aided jt, and the 
prompt and cheerful manner in which he has responded to 
all calls made upon him. 

Amount of tines imposed at Recorder's Court for 

1902 $16,202.00 

Amount of fines imposed at Recorder's Court for 

1903 16,024.95 

Decrease in amount of fines imposed $ 177.05 

Amount of tines paid for year 1903 $5,575.80 

Amount of fines paid for year 1902 5,322.25 

Increase in amount of fines paid $ 253.55 



134 Mayor Smyth's Annual Review. 

EXECUTION OF DISPENSARY LAW. 

Below please liiid number of cases furnished the Corpo- 
ration Counsel, through his Honor, the Mayor, for violations 
of the Liquor Ordinances, as follows: 

( lases Furnished January (Jtb, 11)03 25 

( !ases furnished January 9th, 1903 54 

( Jases furnished April 13th, 1903 30 

( lases furnished July 14th, 1903 31 

( lases furnished November 13th, 1903 9 

( lases furnished December 10th, 1903 56 

Total number of cases furnished 21 1 

DETECTIVE DEPARTMENT. 

The Detective Department still continues to do good ser- 
vice, as the number of criminals sent to the Court of General 
Sessions, and the increase in the amount of property recov- 
ered will show : 

Value of property recovered for year 1903 $8,381.11 

Value of property recovere 1 for year 1902 7,415.11 

Increase in the value of property recovered. . .$ 9(50.00 

POLICE SIGNAL AND TELEPHONE SERVICE. 

This Department, under the direction of City Electrician 
Simons, has been energetically and satisfactorily managed 
during the past year, as his report to the Mayor will show. 

I respectfully call your attention to the condition of the 
Central Station building, which needs a thorough overhaul- 
ing, and recommend that Council make a special appropria- 
tion for that purpose. 

All of which is respectfully submitted, 

W. A. BOYLE, 

Chief of Police. 



Report of Chief of Police. 



135 



Statement showing the Number of Persons Arrested during 
the year, and the Cause of their Arrest. 



OFFENCES 



WHITE 


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. CO 




do 
S3 


S 



Assault 

Assault, Aggravated 

Assaulting an Officer . 

Allowing chimney to take fire 

Allowing dog to run at large and bite. 

Accidentally burned 

Accidentally killed 

Accidentally drowned 

Applied for lodging 

Attempted suicide 

Attempted rape 

Attempted robbery 

Attempting to rescue a prisoner 

Arson 

Administering poison 

Abandoned by parents 

Burglary , 

Burglary and larceny 

Breach of peace 

Breach of trust and larceny 

Bigamy 

Car breaking 

Car breaking and larceny 

Careless driving 

Careless riding 

Carrying concealed weapons 

Cruelty to animals 

Committing a nuisance 

Drunks 

Drunk and disorderly 

Disorderly conduct 

Disorderly persons .... 

Desertion. . 

Died suddenly 

Detained as witnesses 

Disturbing public worship 

Exposure of person 

Exposing nude picture 

Escaped convicts 

Escaped prisoners 

Escaped from orphan house 

Escaped from Hospital 

Firing tire -works on street 

Firing crackers on street 

Firing pistol 

Firm"- rifle 



1 

19 . 
7 .. 
5 . . 
2 . 
9 


83 
.1 49 
. 19 
■1 7 
3; 6 


16 
9 
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164 
116 

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61 

2 

2 "47 
14 180 

256 
4 154 

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2 
3 
1 
2 
3 

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3 

15 



118 

65 

27 

15 

19 

1 

4 

1 

37 

9 

1 

1 

2 

1 

1 

1 

3 

27 

231 

3 

1 

12 

4 

11 

3 

69 

2 

1 

90 

397 

510 

300 

3 

29 

9 

2 

4 

1 

2 

4 

6 

1 

3 

3 

19 
1 



1 3d 



Mayor Smytti* Annual Ri mew 



Number of Persons Arrested — Continued. 



OFFENCES. 



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Firing gun 

Forgery 

Found wounded 

Found injured 

Found sick . 

Found dead .... 

Found drowned 

Fast driving 

Fast riding 

Gambling 

Highway robbery 

Housebreaking 

Housebreaking and larceny 

Handling contrabrand liquor , 

Insane 

Inciting riot 

Interfering with officer 

Interfering with passengers 

Illegal handling of terrapins , 

Keeping disorderly house. ... 

Keeping filthy premises 

Kidnapping 

Larceny (petty) 

Larceny (grand) 

Larceny from the person 

Larceny of live stock. 

Lodged on suspicion 

Lodged for safe-keeping 

Lodged on warrant 

Lodged subject to warrant 

Lodged on telegram 

Lodged subject to order on coroner. . . 

Leaving horse unattended 

Lost children , 

Mayhem 

Murder 

Malicious mischief 

Obstructing sidewalk 

Obtaining money under false pretenses. 

Posting bills without license 

Peddling without license 

Running vehicle without license 

Receiving stolen property 

Riding without paying car fare 

Riding bicycle on sidewalk 

Riding bicycle without light , 



1 












1 
112 


30 


31 


2 


21 


1 


34 


"A 


53 


8 


84 


29 


5 




4 


2 






9 

3 


2 


1 








1 




1 




8 








13 


1 






4 
36 


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5 




1 




6 




5 




10 


4 






1 
6 


2 


4 








1 
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2 


1 


3 






1 

1 

199 


"51 






10 


1 





4 


57 


24 


1 


1 




7 


1 









1 




14 


1 


68 


1 


28 




7 




67 


12 






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20 


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42 




61 
1 

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Report of Chief of Police. 
Number of Persons Arrested — Continued. 



137 



OFFENSE. 



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Refusing to sweep chimney 

Rescued from drowning 

Rape 

Spitting on sidewalk 

Surrended by bondsmen 

Selling vegetables without a license. . 
Selling R. R. tickets without license. 

Selling unwholesome poulty 

Sending in false alarm of fire 

Suicide . 

Swindling 

Trespass 

Throwing banana peel on sidewalk . . 

Throwing glass on street. 

Throwing water from windows 

Using unstamped measures 

Violation order Board of Health 

Violation liquor ordinance 

Wife beating 









2 
1 
1 
1 

2 
58 

I 

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24 

1 
2 

5 
1 
3 

8 

2021 


1 
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1 








1 












1 

9 

2 








1 






196 

1 

933 




5 

74 



3 
2 

1 
1 
2 

63 

2 
1 
9 



1 
3 
1 
5 
1 
211 
9 

3755 



138 



Mill/or Smyth's Annual Tteriev: 



Sentences. 



OOL l) 



Bail forfeited 

1 Msmissed 

" (prosecuting witness failingto appear) 

Dismissed (charges withdrawn ) 

Dismissed i no charges preferred i 

Dismissed (licenses produced) 

Disposed of in ( "\\\ ( !ourl 

Delivered to warrant 

Delivered to officer 

Delivered to parents 

Referred to Magistrate 

Referred to Coroner 

Referred to Jenkins' Orphanage 

Referred to City Assessor , 

Referred to Old Folks Home 

Referred to Market Commissioners 

Referred to U. 3. Commissioners 

Referred to V . S. Authorities 

Referred to ( )rphan House 

Sent to Jail 

Sent Home 

Sent to chain gang. ... 

Sent to Hospital 

Sent to Reformatory 



si 


11 


56 


12 


19 


1 


12 


» 


146 


1 


l-J 




196 


5 


7 


1 


>> 








20 


2 


42 


2 


L5 


1 


"2 




"i 




6 




46 


15 


20 


5 


125 




95 


10 


933 


74 



L01 

244 
63 

21 

11 

L31 

:; 
84 

7 
13 

'ill 
32 

7 
1 
1 

I 



23 219 

136 448 

12 98 

1 36 

1 189 

1 I is; 



; 

15 

'> 

9 
60 

l I 



90 
19 

682 
223 

11 

2021 



352 



71 



727 



211 

107 

11 

44 

34* 

62 

7 

3 

1 

1 

o 

2 
6 

503 
53 

so? 

399 

11 

3755 



Fines Imposed and Paid. 





Amount of Fines 
Imposed at Po- 
lice Court. 


Amount of Fines 
Paid by Prison- 
ers. 


Amount Paid to 
Treasurer. 


Amount of For- 
feitures De- 
ducted from Pay 
of Police for 
Lost Time. 


Amount of Fines 
Imposed on Po- 
lice f r Viola- 
tion of Rules & 
Regulations. 


1st Quarter 

2nd Quarter 

3rd Quarter 

4th Quarter 


* 2,766 00 
3.391 00 
5,776 00 
4,091 95 


•5 1,072 35'$ 
1,424 50 
1,391 00 
1,687 95j 


1,072 35 s 533 88 
1,424 50 529 70 
1.391 00 558 18 
1,687 95 546 37 


1 10 00 
48 50 
34 00 

57 00 




§16,024 95 


? 5,575 80 


$ 


5,575 80 


$ 2,168 13 


$ 149 50 



Total amount deposited to credit of Police Relief and Pension Fund 
from Forfeitures and Fines of Police, $2,317 63. 



Report of Chief of Police. 139 

RECOVERED PROPERTY. 

2 bicycles, 1 overcoat, 1 bicycle, 1 lot eggs, 1 lot cigar- 
ettes, 1 pitcher, 1 mule, 1 box cigars, 4 rugs, 1 lap robe, 2 
umbrellas, 1 barrel sugar, 6 boxes sugar, 1 bucket, 1 M. T. 
sugar barrel, 1 box containing biscuits, 1 bicycle, 2 cows, 
1 sack oats, 1 bicycle, 1 satchel, cash $15, 1 cow, 2 gold 
watches, 2 dozen rings, cash $7.90, 2 overcoats, 1 silk 
muffler, 3 rugs, 1 purse containing $5, 1 gold watch, 1 
lot lead pipe, I shirt, 1 shirt waist, 1 glass, 2 bicycles, 

1 skirt, 1 bag coal, 1 sack, 1 dress, 1 velvet cloak, 1 cape, 

2 umbrellas, 6 rugs, 1 art square, 1 check perforator, 2 
table covers, 1 lap robe, 2 clocks, 4 ladies waists, 1 ham- 
mock, 1 whisk brush and holder, 8 forks, 5 spoons, 3 
knives, 1 napkin ring, 2 broches, 1 pair cuff buttons, 1 
chain bracelet and lock, 3 thimbles, 3 studs, 2 buttons, 
1 K. of P. charm, 8 rings, 1 pair opera glasses, 1 stud, 2 
bags mail wire, 1 lock, 1 lot coal, 1 pair pants, 1 cap, 
cash 9 cents, 1 bull dog, 1 bicycle, 1 pair sho s, 1 suit 
clothes, 1 lot clothing, 1 box paints, 1 overcoat, 1 boys 
sailor suit, 1 Winchester rifle, 2 bicycles, cash 4 cents, 2 
overcoats, 1 pair eye glasses, 1 clock, 1 pistol, 1 coat, 4 
barrels glassware, 1 mandolin, cash 6 cents, 2 dice, 5 
hammers, 1 vase, 1 silk quilt, 4 lace curtains, 1 pea fowl, 
65 packages tobacco, 40 packages cheroots, 10 boxes cig- 
arettes, 6 pair shoes, 1 Sterns bicycle, 1 copper pump, 1 
lot lead, 1 hat, purse containing cards, 3 pair shoes, 1 
overcoat, 1 bicycle, 1 key, 1 pair clippers, 1 clock, 1 
hat, 1 purse containing cards and papers, 1 lot car 
brasses, 1 rocker, 5 boxes tobacco, 1 lot wood and coal, 
cash 8 cents, 2 dice, 1 bicycle, 50 lbs. sugar, 4 forks, 2 
knives, 1 pair pants, cash $1.00, cash $16.43, 1 saw, 3 
hammers, 1 scale, cash $142.50, 1 purse and papers, 1 
cast net, 1 silk umbrella, 4 cabbages, 1 hat, 1 cigar 
machine, 1 boat, 1 pair Linengans Connecters, 1 bicycle, 
1 silk umbrella, 1 bicycle, 1 trunk and contents, cash 
$5.00, 1 crap table, 1 bottle pickles, 1 set harness, 1 card 



llo Mayor Smyth's Annual Review. 

table, 3 crap tables, l lot chips, 10 decks cards, 1. coal 
and pants. 1 bicycle, 1 diamond ring, 1 prayer book, 1 
gold watch and chain, 1 bicycle, 2 crap tables, 2 card 
tables, 1 pack cards, cash 'JO cents, 3 tables, 1 deck cards, 
1 combination ring, 1 watch, 1 box Schnapp's tobacco, 1 
silk umbrella, 1 bicycle, 1 lot china, 5 caddies tobacco, 1 
pistol, 1 bicycle, 2 satchels, 1 set harness, 1 suit clothes, 

1 glass jar and contents, 1 watch and chain, 1 watch, 1 
case matches, cash $5.00, 2 dice, cash 5 cents, 1 razor, 

2 umbrellas, 1 show case and contents, 1 bicycle, 1 silver 
napkin ring, 2 pairs cuff buttons, 1 lot wood, 1 small 
pistol, 1 lot terrapins, 1 pair pants, knives, 6 nut picks, 
1 horse, 1 lot clothing, cash 20 cents, 1 horse, 1 diamond 
ring, 2 umbrellas, I bag spice, I box fly paper, 1 bottle 
jam, 1 watch, 1 overcoat, 1 pistol, 1 bag cotton seed 
meal, 1 horse, 1 goat, harness and cart, 1 silk um- 
brella, cash 35 cents, 1 sack salt, 17 watches, 2 pairs 
pants, 2 coats, 1 vest, 1 coat, 2 silver table spoons, 1 coat 
and papers, 1 butter knife, cash $2.45, 4 vests, 4 pair 
pants, 6 head fowls, 1 shell purse, 2 coats, 1 ladies cloak, 
1 lot clothing, 1 bag cash 15 cents, 1 watch and chain, 

3 covers, 1 piece dress goods, 3 table cloths, 1 pair pants, 
1 hat, 2 crap tables, 4 dice, 10 cents, 1 dice, 8 sheets, 1 
jacket, 1 piece silk, 2 pieces cloth, 1 suit clothes, 1 coat, 
6 towels, 60 pesos [Chilian currency] 92 cents, 1 silver 
watch, 1 pistol, 1 organ, 1 lot brasses, 1 watch, 7 boxes 
cigars, 1 lot apples. 1 license, 1 harness, 500 lbs. brass, 
cash $1.00, 1 gold watch, 1 bicycle, 1 double cased gold 
watch, 1 bicycle, 1 guitar, 1 pair pants, 1 horse, 1 hat, 
1 suit clothes, 1 thermometer, 1 overcoat, 2 shirts, 2 vests, 
1 pillow case, 1 towel, 1 satchel and contents, 2 coats, 

1 Pointer dog, 1 clock, 1 umbrella, 1 overcoat, 1 bunch 
keys, 2 pairs gloves, 1 overcoat, 1 key and lot of papers, 

2 bicycles, 1 push-cart and lot of fish, 1 medal, 1 ladies 
feather boa, 2 shirts, ] Kgold watclL and chain, 1 buggy 
whip, 1 ladies belt, 1 coat and vest, 1 gold watch and 
chain, 1 basket groceries, 1 pair shoes, 1 pistol, 1 trunk 



Report of Chief of Police. 141 

clothes 48 cans corn, cash $1.25, 1 satchel, 2 sacks rice, 
1 coat, 2 bicycles, 1 coat and vest, 1 Setter dog, 3 bicy- 
cles, 1 vest, 1 watch, 1 chair, 1 lot groceries, 1 lot cloth- 
ing, 1 watch and chain, 1 pair diamond cuff buttons, 1 
barrel apples, 2 pistols, 1 gold ring, 1 watch, 3 rings, 1 
trunk and contents, 1 picture, 2 glasses, 1 dish, 1 towel, 
cash 5 cents, 1 pack cards, cash 2 cents, 2 dice, 1 box 
bologna, 1 package U. S. Mail, 1 opal ring, 1 sack grist, 
1 lot geranimums, 2 hogs, 1 coat, 1 pair pants, 1 suit 
clothes, 1 bicycle; 1 mackintosh coat, 1 silver watch, 1 
lot clothing, 1 bicycle, 1 plug tobacco, cash $4.00, 9 1 
silver spoons, 22 silver forks, 2 silver butter knives, 1 
silver laddie, 1 silver teapot, 1 silver cup, 1 mackintosh, 
1 Indies cloak, 12 silver spoons, 1 gold watch fob and 
medallion, 16 silver spoons, 1 Stetson hat, 3 cans paint, 
1 gold bracelet, In all valued at $8,381.11. 

Cash recovered $ 307 00 

Unclaimed and deposited with Treasurer 3 65 

Returned to owners $ 303 35 

Also GO pesos, Chilian Currency, returned to owner. 

Unclaimed property $38 00 

Clubs 3 00 

Deposited with Treasurer $41 00 

POLICE SIGNAL AND TELEPHONE SERVICE. 

Calls sent in by policemen 89,888 

Times. Miles. 

Alarms responded to by wagons .1,688 3,376 

Wagons sent to Jail with prisoners 300 600 

Wagons sent to Trial Justice with prisoners. 293 566 

Wagons sent to Hospital with prisoners 419 838 

Wagons sent with Sergeant and Squad to 

lire 89 178 

Wagons sent on special duty 3,239 6,464 

Total 6,028 12,022 



L42 Mayor Smyth' '& Annual Review. 

Shot at requesl of owners: 7>~> dogs, \- horses, - mules 
ami 2 cows. 

Taken up running at large and disposed of as per City 
Ordinances: 8 mules, 9 horses, 22 cows, 4 goats, 3 hogs. 

Found open and owners or occupants notified or watched 
by the police : 1 club, 1 U. S. mail box, 1 dispensary, Audi- 
torium twice, I laundry, 1 residence, 2 barbershops, 1 Mer- 
chants Exchange, Academy of Music, 3 times, 39 office,-, 6 
shops, 69 stores, 5 banks, 5 market stalls, 2 churches, 1 City 
Hall. 

Alarms of Fire sounded from boxes and attended by the 
police 91. 

L certify that the foregoing is a correct Report, as per 
Recorder's Morning Reports. W. A. BOYLE, 

Tnos. P. Moran, Chief of Police. 

Orderly Sergeant. 



Pleasure Grounds. 143 



PLEASURE GROUNDS 



EIGHTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE BOARD OF PARK 
COMMISSIONERS. 



To the Honorable the Mayor and City Council: 

Gentlemen — Your Board of Park Commissioners pre- 
sent this, their eighth Annual Report for the fiscal year 
ending December 31st, 1003, together with a statement of 
their disbursements, vouchers for the same being on file in 
the office of the City Treasurer. 

HAMPTON PARK. 

This park, situated on Rutledge avenue, and extending 
from said avenue to the Ashley river, contains that part 
of the grounds of the South Carolina Interstate and West 
Indian Exposition Company known as the "Sunken Gar- 
dens" and that tract of land on the Ashley river known as 
"Rhett Farm." 

At the meeting of the Board of Park Commissioners held 
July 8. 1903, the following resolutions were unanimously 
passed : 

Resolved, That the Board of Park Commissioners hearti' . / approve of 
the suggestion that the new park be called "Hampton Park," and do 
earnestly recommend the City Council to so designate it. 

Charleston, g. C, May 25, 190S. 
To the Board of Park Commissioners: 

Gentlemen — At a meeting of the committee on the 
Charleston Memorial to General Wade Hampton the fol 
lowing resolution was unanimously adopted : 

Resolved, That the Chairman be requested to communicate with the 
proper authorities and request that the new park on the site of the 
recent Exposition be called "Hampton Park." 



I II Mayor Smyth's Annual Review. 

In pursuance of the above resolution, I have the honor 
to transmit to your honorable body the requesl of the coin 
inittee of twenty-three. 

With greal respect, I am yours, 

THEODORE G. BARKER, Chairman. 

Resolved, Thai the Board of Park Commissioners believe thai within 
the limits of this park, so named, will be found the most appropriate 
site for the creel ion of a suitable monumenl to commemorate the un- 
swerving loyally and devotion of Gen. Wade Hampton to his native 
city. 

Resolved, Thai the Chairman appoint a committee of three to co- 
operate with the Committee on Charleston Memorial to Gen. Wade 
Hampton, and a similar committee from City Council, to lake steps for 
the accomplishment of this solemn duty. 

In accordance with the above, the Board of Park Com 
missioners would ask the approval of City Council to the 
naming- of tins new park as "Hampton Park" and that the 
Mayor appoint a connnitlee of three Aldermen to cooperate 
with the committees herein named for the purpose herein 
set forth. 

Resolved, To recommend to City Council the purchase of the entire 
tract of land known as the Rhett Farm, for the sum of $35,000; payable, 
on approval of the titles by Corporation Counsel, as follows: $15,000 
cash, and the balance in four equal annual payments of $5,000 each, 
deferred payments carrying interest at the rate of 4 per cent per annum, 
and said annual payments of $5,000 to be made on the first day of July, 
in the years 1904, 1905, 1906, 1907. Rentals of the lands from July 1, 
1903, to go to the Board of Park Commissioners, and interest on de- 
terred payments to begin July 1, 1903. 

Under the above the Park Commissioners would ask that 
they be authorized to make said purchase on said terms, 
subject to the approval of the Ways and Means Committee. 

All of which is respectfully submitted and favorable 

action asked thereon. 

SAMUEL LAPHAM, 
Chairman Park Commissioners. 
W. G. JEFFORDS, Secretary. 



Pleasure Grounds. 145 



The above report was unanimously confirmed by City 
Council on July 14th, 1904, and Messrs. Smyth, Kroeg and 
Storen from the Park Board, and Messrs. Lapham, Frost 
and Riley from City Council, were appointed on the above 
recommended committee to serve with the committee from 
General Wade Hampton Memorial Association, of Char- 
leston, S. C. 

Since the close of the exposition the care of the "Sunken 
Gardens'' and the policing of the grounds of said company 
has been done and performed under the direction of tiit- 
Board of Park Commissioners, as immediately after the 
closing of the exposition that company dispensed with their 
guards, gardeners, etc., and left everything appertaining to 
care and order to be assumed by this board, while at the 
same time that .company endeavored to sell and remove 
from the grounds purchased by the city, everything of value. 
As the "Sunken Gardens" were a feature of the exposition 
the Board of Park Commissioners have continued them 
as a feature of this park, at a considerable expense, owing 
to the fact that much of the construction was of a temporary 
character, and had to be renewed. 

The band stand has been remodeled and rebuilt and con- 
certs will be given at stated intervals. A railway station 
iias been erected and the Consolidated Railway, Gas and 
Electric Company have in connection with their King street 
line, extended their tracks to this station, and thus the 
park is easy of access from all parts of the city and at a five 
cent fare. A roadway has been laid out from Rutledge ave 
nue to the plaza on the north, and also a roadway construct- 
ed on the east and south sides of this park, approaching the 
plaza on the west, and other roadways are in process of 
being built. Walks have been made from the railway sta- 
tion connecting with the walks around the Sunken Gardens 
and to the band stand and plaza, This entire tract was de- 
titute of trees when purchased and over one thousand trees 
have been planted along these walks and roadways, which 
will in a short time give the desired shade. Suitable pub- 
lic comforts, green houses, arbors, etc., have been erected 
and a telegraph line, connecting the park with the police and 
10 



.1 I'i Mayor Smyth's Annual Review. 

Pre alarm telegraph been built, and as soon as the pavilion 
is built telephonic connection can be bad with the entire 
city. The following statuary, purchased from the Exposi- 
tion Company, lias been placed on permanenl liases: 

1. Buguenol Group, by Miss Elsie Ward, of Missouri. 

2. Indian Group, by Carl Tefft, of New York. 

;>. Negro Group, by Charles Lope/, of New York. 

1. Colonial Group, by Oscar Lenz, of New York. 

5. Aztec Group, by Louis A. Gudebrod, of New York. 

The above being of original design, and a number of other 
works, being reproductions of notable works of famous 
sculptors, among which are: 

The Equestrian Statue of Washington, by French. 

The "Bronco Buster," by Borglum, etc., etc. 

All of which attract the interest of lovers of art and add 
materially to the beauty of this part of the park. 

The Nursery formerly established at Chicora Park lias 
been removed to Hampton Park, and will here be continued 
on a larger scale. A small portion of this park has been 
placed in charge of the Agricultural Society for the purposes 
of an experimental station for grasses and grains suitable 
to this section, and is an instructive feature to all interested 
jn agriculture. The efforts of the commissioners have been 
and will be exerted in keeping up the "Sunken Gardens" and 
plaza and the walks and roadways connected therewith, and 
as funds are available to extend the walks and roadways to 
the Ashley river and to provide shade trees therefor, but 
slow will be the improvement of the tract between the Sun- 
ken Gardens and plaza and the Ashley river, unless City- 
Council increases its appropriation for the park depart- 
ment, as the care and maintenance requires to a large ex- 
tent the full appropriation made for Bampton Park. 

CHICORA PARK. 

The area of this park having been further curtailed by the 
sale to the United States Navy Department of ninety acres 
for a site for a Naval Hospital in connection with the Navv 
Yard there established, it has been deemed best to discon- 
tinue this park, as such, and with the funds obtained from 



Pleasure Grounds. 147 

the sale of this land has been purchased! "Hampton Park 7 ' 
above described, and also a lot of land on Lucas Street, op- 
posite the City Hospital, in order that the space in front of 
the City Hospital might not be built upon in such a manner 
as might affect this institution in an undesirable way. 

Also to the Sale of Chicora Park Account has been 
charged the cost of eliminating a claimed right of way by 
■E. P. Burton & Co. over that portion of Chicora Park pur- 
chased from Noisette and sold to the United States and this 
alleged claim, under the advice of the Mayor and Corpora- 
tion Counsel, was extinguished by the building of a bridge 
across Noisette Creek at an expense of $2,750. and giving a 
right of way, under certain limitations, to the Station of the 
Electric Line near the Navy Yard entrance, and the pay- 
ment to them of $1,000, all of which is fully set out in a deed 
as to the same, and done under a resolution of City Council 
authorizing the Mayor to do all and any acts necessary to 
deed to the United States the laud for a Navy Yard, free oi 
all encumbrances. 

UPPER WARD'S PARKS. 

The Parks in this sub-division, under the direction of 
Mr. W. J. Storen, the chairman of the committee in charge 
of these Parks, have received due care and attention and 
been kept up in every particular. 

LOWER WARD'S PARKS. 

Are in charge of a committe'e of this Board, of wliich Mr. 
Waring P. Carrington is Chairman, and under his direction 
much attention has been given to White Point Garden and 
the Battery. Many trees, shrubs and flowers have been set 
out, walks renewed, pavement to High Battery repaired ami 
Cannon Park received much care and attention and the 

AUDITORIUM 

has been repaired at considerable expense, and in view of the 
demand for more accommodations for school children m 
this section, and the very few occasions on which the Audi- 



I Is 



Mayor Smyth's Annual Review, 



torium is used, ii is recommended by the Board thai sonit 
arrangements be made with the Board of School Commis- 
sioners to converl this building, which can be easily done, 
into a school house to be called the 

THOMSON MEMORIAL SCHOOL, 

and thus relieve the crowded condition of the Bennett School 
for while children and many children who are now al tending 
the Crafts School would lind a school on Rut ledge Avenue 
and Beimel I Street much more convenient. 

IX GENERAL. 



With the limited amount of money al the disposal of the 
Park Commissioners they have endeavored to give the best 
results possible, and they earnestly desire thai City Council 
will increase the appropriation for Parks to as large an 
amount as is possible with a reasonable lax rate. 

All of which is respectfully submitted, 

SAMUEL LAPHAM, Chairman. 

W. G. JEFFORDS, Secretary. 



Pleasure Grounds. ' 149 



Disbursements of the Board of Park Commissioners for the 
Fiscal Year Ending December 'SI, 1903. 

CHICORA PARK— 

Balance construction of water plant $2,203 00 

Nursery trees and shrubs 386 75 

Operating - water plant 983 28 

Cash payment Burton right of way 1,000 00 

Attorneys fees 20 00 

— $ 4,593 09 

HAMPTON PARK— 

Labor, gardner, watchman and police $3,686 02 

Material, trees, etc 961 05 

Construction roadways, drains, etc 992 17 

Construction new buildings and plans. 2,091 00 

Repairs statuary, arbor, stands, etc 481 30 

Insurance 63 00 

Interest — Six months balance purchase money on 

Rhett Farmat 4 per cent 400 00 

— s $ 9,274 53 

UPPER WARDS PARK— 

Labor and care of parks $ 491 15 

Trees and shell 76 30 

$ 507 45 

LOWER WARD'S PARKS— 

Labor, care and material $ 752 00 

Repairs pavements, benches, etc 155 80 

Trees, shrubs and materials 701 25 

Auditorium — Insurance and repairs 1,381 54 

$ 2,990 59 

INCIDENTALS— 

Mounted police $ 600 00 

Salary Secretary 150 00 

Printing, stationery, transportation, etc 146 03 

$ 896 03 

TRANSACTIONS OF SALE OF CHICORA PARK FUNDS. 

Balance from 1902 $35,501 00 

Sale to A. C. L., right of way, net proceeds 725 50 

Total $36,226 50 

Purchase land Lucas St., opp. City Hospital ....$ 3,302 75 
Purchase land of the U. S. and recording titles . . 22 14 

Purchase money Rhett Farm, and interest 15,220 00 

Cost Burton bridge and roadway 2,750 00 

Total . . . . .$21,294 89 

Balance forward to 1904 14,931 61 -$36,226 50 



[50 Mat/or Smyth's Annual Renew. 

Expenditures for Marion Square. 



1903 Amount of Appropriation $ 500 00 

Feb. 2 Paid J. ,1. Campbell labor for Jan... $33 33 

Paid " " for Trees 2 00— 35 33 

Mch. 'J Paid " " for Labor February 33 33 

April 1 Paid " " for Labor March 33 33 

May 1 Paid " " for Labor April 33 33 

ir» Paid Coleman-Wagener Hardw. Co. (Mower) 10 HO 

June 1 Paid J. J. Campbell, labor for May 33 33 

July 1 Paid " " labor for June 38 33 

20 Paid Solomon Cohens labor on fence 7 00 

24 Paid J. J. Campbell for extra labor 2 50 

Aug. 1 Paid ' '• " " " 3 75 

1 Paid " " labor for July 33 3.3 

Sept. 3 Paid " " labor for August 33 33 

Paid " ' ' for extra labor G 00 

16 Paid L. 0. Bond, repairs to mower 2 00 

Oct. 1 Paid J. J. Campbell, labor for Sept 33 33 

Paid " " extra labor 5 00 

21 Paid Coleman-Wagener Hdw. Co. lawn mowers 12 20 

Nov. 2 Paid J. J. Campbell, labor for October 33 33 

Dec 1 Paid '* " " " November 33 33 

31 Paid " ' " " December 33 37 

Paid " " " " extra labor 4 00 

Paid Coleman-Wagener Ildw. Co 1 40 

Balance 38 56 

8500 00— §500 00 

ASBUEY COWARD, 
Chairman Commissioners Marion Square. 



Pleasure Grounds. 151 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONERS OF COLONIAL COM- 
MON AND ASHLEY RIVER EMBANKMENT. 

Charleston, S. C, February 17, 1904. 

To the Hoik R. Gk Rhett, Mayor of Charleston, S. C. : 

Dear Sir — The Board of Commissioners of Colonial Com- 
mon and Ashley River Embankment beg leave to submit 
their Report for year ending December 31, 1903: 

Received from City Treasurer rents collected $1,000 00 

Received from sale of old Bricks and Curbing 26 04 

Received from sale of Condemned Boats. ... 1 50 

Received from Interest on Deposits in Savings Bank 72 36 

Balance on Land January 1, 1903 1,916 42 

$3 016 32 
AMOUNTS PAID OUT. 

For 4 Extra Lights on Rutledge Street Lake 120 00 

For Planting and Boxing Trees, etc , 441 90 

For Cutting Grass and Repairs to Seats and all work around the 

Lake 190 01 

Total expenses for year. , $ 751 91 

Balance Cash on hand December 31, 1903 2,264 41 

$3 016 32 
The Books of the Board have been examined as customary 
by the City Treasurer, and all Vouchers for the year 1903 
left with him. 

C. A. CHISOLM, 
Chairman Board Colonial Common and Ashley River Em- 
bankment. 






|.._! Mayor Smyth'* Annual Radar. 

BUREAU OF FREIGHT AND TRANSPORTATION 
OF CITY OF CHARLESTON. 



i Established by Older of City Council, i 



NINTH ANNUAL REPORT. 



Charleston, S. C., January 1 1th, L904. 

To tbe Honorable the Mayor and Aldermen of City Council 

of Charleston : 

Gentlemen — I beg to submit herewith the Ninth Animal 
Report of the Bureau of Freight and Transportation. 

For convenient reference as to the conduct and work of 
the Bureau, the following classification is used : 
1. Organization. 
'1. Relations with Carriers. 
:>. Correction of Discriminating Rates and Conditions 

effecting the city's interests. 
4. Matters now on hand for adjustment. 

1. ORGANIZATION. 

The Manager assumed charge of this office January 1st, 
1903, the duties of the office for the two years previous 
having been performed by the Chairman of the Board of 
Commissioners. The clerical force of the office consists of 
Manager, Secretary and Clerk. The present Board of Com- 
missioners is composed of the following gentlemen : 

G. Walter Mclver, Chairman; Young Men's Business 
League: ( Jeorge B. Edwards, Chamber of Commerce; IT. F. 
Bremer, Merchants Exchange; C. B. Jenkins, Commercial 
Club; E. C. Hesse, Cotton Exchange; F. S. Hanckel, W. B. 
Wilson, City Council. 

2. RELATION OF CARRIERS. 

The Bureau has pursued a policy of moderation and con- 
servatism towards the transportation companies serving this 



Bureau of Freight and Transportation. 153 

city and have, on the whole, maintained pleasant relations 
with them. The attitude of these carriers has not always 
been one to inspire confidence as to their friendly feeling 
toward this port, and many questions have arisen where the 
interests of the city of Charleston have been disregarded. 
This attitude is especially noticeable where it is necessary 
that any reduction of rates should be made to or from 
Charleston to meet competitive conditions at other points. 

The receipts of cotton at this port indicate that a policy of 
routing unfavorable to Charleston has been adopted. The 
receipts at Charleston for the year from September 1st, 1902 
to September 1st, 1903 show a decrease of 65,980 bales, as 
compared with the same period for the year previous, while 
the receipts at every other South Atlantic port except Bruns- 
wick showed an increase. This is also true for the present 
season. From September 1st, 1903 to December 11th, 1903 
the Government reports show: 

Receipts Receipts Decrease Increase 
1902 1903 

Charleston, S. C 150,805 127,410 23,395 

Savannah, Ga 761,198 763,479 2,281 

Wilmington, N. C 238,597 257,376 18,779 

Norfolk Va 250,087 274,870 24,783 

This decrease apparently indicates their policy in regard 
to forwarding cotton through this port. 

In view of these tacts, and in order to increase the efficiency 
of the Bureau, we hope that such effective support will be 
given to it by your honorable body and the business public 
of Charleston, as to further increase its power for usefulness. 

3. CORRECTION OF DISCRIMINATING KATES AND 
CONDITIONS AFFECTING THE CITY'S INTERESTS. 

RATES FROM CHARLESTON, S. C, TO SOUTHEASTERN TERRI- 
TORY FILE 3. 

This question was raised by the Chairman of the Board in 
May 1902, in the effort to secure an adjustment of the rates 



I.»l Mayor Smyth's Annual Review. 

between Charleston and points in South Carolina and North 
Carolina, that would enable this port to compete on a just 
and relative rate basis with Virginia cities in the same ter- 
ritory. When your Manager took charge of the affairs of 
the Bureau, negotiations had reached a point where the 
Traffic Manager of the Southern Railway, had admitted that 
the adjustment was wrong and changes would have to he 
made, and had agreed to submit a line of rates which they 
were willing to put into effect which would give this city 
the relief asked for, and the first seven sheets of these rates 
reached here January 2nd, 1903, and the last sheets on Jan- 
uary 19th, L903. When all the advance sheets of the pro- 
posed rates had been received and checked up, it was found 
that while the rates were lower than those now in effect, 
they would not give the relief necessary, and were not on a 
just and relative basis with the rates from Virginia Cities, 
and counter scales of rates were prepared and submitted to 
the Traffic Manager of the Southern Railway and a confer- 
ence had with him in Washington on January 29, and an 
agreement reached subject to the approval of our Board of 
Commissioners and the proposed rates finally agreed to on 
February 4th 1903. Subsequent to February 4th it was 
stated by the Traffic Manager of the Southern Railway, that 
it would be necessary to have the concurrence of the other 
railroad lines, though they did not anticipate that any objec- 
tions would be offered, before the reductions in this state 
could be made effective (though the reductions to North 
Carolina points were made effective without their concur- 
rence), and the adjustment was delayed from time to time 
for reasons not given us, until June 24th 1903, at which 
time the Chairman and Manager of this Bureau were invited 
to attend a meeting of the Rate Committee held in Boston, 
Mass. At this meeting various objections to putting these 
rates into effect were raised by the representatives of the 
Atlantic Coast Line, Seaboard Air Line and Southern Rwy., 
and it became apparent that they did not intend to stand by 
their agreement as to the rates within the state of South 



Bureau of Freight and Transportation. 155 

Carolina. It was then decided by our Board of Commis- 
sioners to appeal to the South Carolina Railroad Commis- 
sion, and accordingly the necessary data was secured and a 
petition filed with said Commission on August 22nd 1903. 
In the meantime it developed that information had been 
given to the merchants of the Piedmont section of the State 
(presumably by a representative of one of the railroads) that 
Charleston was asking for an adjustment of freight rates that 
would be detrimental to their interests and that they would 
make a protest against the Railroad Commission granting 
our petition. The Railroad Commission had fixed the date 
for the hearing of our petition for September 23rd 1903 and 
in view of the protest from the Piedmont section, our Board 
passed a resolution that a conference be held between this 
Bureau and the merchants of Charleston in order to get 
their views on the subject of the action to be taken by the 
Bureau in the case before the Railroad Commission, and also 
to arrange for a meeting of the business men of this city and 
the business men of the Piedmont section, which was ar- 
ranged and held at Columbia, September 22nd, and an har- 
monious understanding reached that our original petition 
should be withdrawn, and a joint petition filed by the com- 
mercial bodies from all sections of the state. This petition 
was drawn by Messrs W. C. Miller and J. P. K. Bryan, your 
Manager preparing the necessary figures, and signed by the 
commercial bodies at interest and filed with the South Car- 
olina Railroad Commission on November 17th 1903, and 
date of hearing fixed by them for January 18th 1904. This 
case is still pending and from reports received we are encour- 
aged to believe that a favorable decision will be rendered. 

REDUCTION OF RATES FROM CHARLESTON TO POINTS IN 
NORTH CAROLINA, FILE NO. 3. 

These rates were considered at the same time the rates 
from Charleston to South Carolina points were considered 
and reductions were made to a large number of Southern 
Railway stations as follows : 



I 01 



Mayor Smyth's .\mni<// Review. 







. 


fl » 








xj 


1 1 [ 


o % 




From 


PER HUNDRED POUNDS. 




Hill 


, o 

Z ± 

- rl 


PER CAR 


( iharleston, s. i 






Lbs 




To 
































,, 


3 


1 


5 


6 


A 


i: 


(' 


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i; ii 


V 


K 


1, 


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r'ineville N.C... 


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7 


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5 


6 


2 


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3 


1 


r. 


10 


1 


1 


in 


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I (Ml 


2 00 


2 50 


Griffith... . •• 


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9 


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5 


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3 


3 


1 


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10 


1 


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75 


1 llll 


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Tryon .......•• | 








































Melrose . . . •• , 








































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is 


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Fletchers... \ 






































Ardi'ti • • | 








































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Asheville. •• .. 












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Alexander ■• J 

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Kollins •• 








































Marshall ■• I 








































Barnard | 








































Stewards •• ' 








































Sandy Bottom ■ ■ | 

Stack house . . •' i 








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Kings iMo'nt'n •• 








































G rover . . . . •• | 








































Greenlea . •• l 








































Old Fort ■• ! 

Collins •• [ 








1 




















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Waynesville . . •• j 








1 




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1 


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Wilmot •• | 






































Whittier •• \ 








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in 


35 


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Bryson ■ ■ J 









































Bureau of Freight and Transportation. 



157 



From 

Charleston, S C. 

To 

























3 


Per 


OX2 






PER HUNDRED POUNDS. 


93 

a- 
F 


100 
lbs. 


E^~ 

• „ o 
So 

P4<N 


PER (J A 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


A 


B 


CD 


E 


II 


K 


L 


M 


N 






Bushnell N 

Welsh 

Judson 

Almond 

Wesser Creek. 
Talc Mount'n. 

Hewetts 

Nantahala 

Topton 

Rhoda 

Andrews 

Hiawassee 

Marble 

Talcsyde 

Valley town ... 

Tomotia 

Regal 

Newells 

Spencer 

So. Holtsburg. 

Holtsburg 

Lenwood 

Lexington 

Conrads 

M organs vi He . 
High Point.... 
Jamestown . . . 
Greensboro . . . 
Hendersonv'le 

Rndd 

Browns Sum'tt 

Benaja 

Reidsville 

Ruffln 

Pelham 

McLeansville . 
Gibsonville . .. 
Elon College . . 

Burlingtou 

Graham 

Haw River 

Mebane 

Efland 

Hillsboro 

Occoneechee . . 
Dukes Siding. 

University 

Brassfield 

Nelson 

Morrisville 

Method 

Garner 

Auburn 

Clayton 

Vinson 

Wilsons Mills. 

Pine Level 

Princeton 

Whitley s 

Rose 

Holloway 

Elerbee 

Greens 

Wilkins 

Lyons 

Stems 

Providence . . . 
Oxford 



.. 8 

.. 3 

6 i73 



1K> 



\.\i 



4 \i}4 



40 35 
40 35 



30 



1 70 2 00 

1 711 2 DO 



1 70 2 00 



1 70 



1 00 

10 00 



1 00 

1 00 
6 00 

3 00 

3 00 

2 00 
2 00 
2 00 



2 00 



4 50 



1 00 .. 



2 00 
2 00 

2 00 

2 00 

2 00 
2 00 



4 00 

4 00 



4 00 



4 00 



4 50 



2 50 



25 

2"> 

2 00 



158 



Mayor Smyth's Ann mil Review. 



Prom 
Charleston, s. C. 


PEK HUNDRED POUN 1 >s 


- 
■s. 
■- 

QJ 

¥ 


Pei 

100 

His. 

K 


0)0 

1, M 


PER CAR 


To 

l 


2 3 4 


5 6 A B C 


D E II 


N I • 



Homers N 

Dabney 

Lewis. 

Gregory 

Stovall 

Bullocks 

Vandalia 

Pleasant ( rar'n 

Climax 

.Julian 

Liberl y 

Staley 

SilerCity...... 

Or.' Hill 

Dunlaps .Mill.. 

Hear ( 'reek 

Goldston 

l>i{^^s Sidinu . 
Battle < rround 
Summerfleld 

Stokesdale 

Rocky Springs 

Elisboro 

Robinsons Tk 

Siding 

15. & R. Siding 
Bellews Creek. 

Hariston 

Red < !roas 

Lineberry 

Millboro 

Cedar Kails Fy 

( !edar Falls 

Frank linville. 
Island Ford. .. 

Ramseur 

Shepherds 

Trontman 

Clifford 

Barium Spgs. . 

Woodleaf 

Cooleemee Jet. 
Cooleemee Mis 

Moeksville 

( 'ornatzer 

Beck 

Advance 

Idols 

( llemmonsv'le 

Atwood 

Terra Cotta.. . 
Guilford ("llge 

Friendship 

Kernersville.. . 

Gastonia 

Marion 

Murphy 



lu in lis 

ioi's'I'V 



2 1 



:; I 



6 8 

1 2 

I 



I 64 



6 I 
6 4 



2 8 
11 7 



1 1.-, 



■l 00 



05 1 00 



'J.", 

I 20 
I 20 

50 

05 



]0 00 
10 00 
10 00 

1 00 

1 00 
7 00 



4 50 
I 50 

| llll 



J5 



5 50 
4 50 

2 5ii 

35 

■1< 
I 00 



Bureau of Freight and Transportation. 159 

REDUCTION OF KATES ON SUGAR FROM CHARLESTON, FILE 

NO. 5. 

At the time the reductions of rates were made from Charles- 
ton to points in North Carolina, it was agreed that if the 
rates from Virginia Cities to those points were advanced, 
that a like advance sdould be made from Charleston and also 
that if any reductions were subsequently made from Virginia 
Cities to those points like reductions would be made from 
Charleston. We found that certain reductions had been 
made from Norfolk and on taking the matter up with the 
Traffic Manager of the Southern Rwy., the following reduc- 
tions were made from Charleston: 

Amount 

Old Rate New Rate Reduced 

TO per 100 per 100 per 100 

lbs. . lbs. lbs. 

Plotts N. C. 32 30 2 

Catawba " 32 30 2 

Claremont " 32^ 30 2^ 

Newton " 33 30 3 

Conover " 34 30 4 

Hickory " 35 30 5 

Hildebran " 3G 30 6 

Connelly Springs ' 36 30 IS 

Valdese , .. " 37 30 7 

Drexel " 37 30 7 

Morgan ton " 37 30 7 

Calvin "37 30 7 

Glen Alpine " 37 30 7 

Bridgewater " 37 30 7 

Nebo " 37 30 7 

Marion " 35 30 5 

Greenlee. . .' " 35 30 5 

Old Fort " 35 30 5 

Collins "35 30 5 

Dendron " 35 30 5 

Round Knob " 35 30 5 

Graphiteville " 35 30 5 

Mud Cut " 35 30 5 

Black Mt " 35 30 5 

Swannannoa " 35 30 5 

Azalis " 35 30 5 

Biltmore < ' 35 30 5 

Asheville ' • 35 30 '5 



160 Mf/i/or Smyth's Annual Review. 

These reductions open n new territory to Charleston, and 
will enable her merchants to largely increase their sugar 
business. 

REDUCTION OF RATES ON TOBACCO IN HOGSHEADS FILE 19. 

I }»on the request of interested parties the Bureau took up 
with the Clyde Steamship Co., the rates on Tobacco in [logs- 
heads from Charleston to New Vork, which was favorably 
considered, they making a rate of L8 cents per 100 lbs steam- 
er's dock Charleston to steamer dock New York, being a 
reduction of 9 cents per 100 lbs. 

REDUCTION OF RATES ON ATLANTIC COAST LINE (C. & S. 
DIVISION) FILE 20. 

Article 3, Freight Rules and Regulations of the South 
Carolina Railroad Commission reads as follows: "In the ap- 
plication of the Standard Freight Tariff for purposes of 
transportation, main lines, branches and connecting rail- 
roads, when operated together or controlled by one company, 
shall be regarded as parts of one road and the rates shall be 
computed as upon parts of one and the same road." 

\\ r e construed this to mean that no higher rates should 
be charged on one part of any railroad system in this state 
than was charged for transporting the same articles for a 
like distance on any other part of the same system. 

When the Atlantic Coast Line assumed control of the 
Plant System the Charleston & Savannah Division of this 
system had been permitted to operate a higher scale of rates 
on said division than the Atlantic Coast Line was permitted 
to operate on their original lines, therefore under the above 
rules they should at once have reduced these rates, but upon 
investigation we found they had not done so, and on January 
15th, 1903, we took the matter up with the Railroad Com- 
mission and succeeded in having the correct rates made ef- 
fective July 1st 1903, resulting in the following reductions: 



Bureau of Freight and Transportation. 



161 



Between 

Charleston, S. C. 

and 



PER- HUNDRED POUNDS 



A B 



D E H 



Fetteressa B.C. 

Rantowles 

Berry Hill 

Ilavenel 

Mallards 

Adam's Run 

Pon Pon 

Jacksonboro 

Ashepoo 

Green Pond 

Whitehall 

Blakes 

salkehatchee 

Yemessee 

Coosawhatchee 

Kidgeland 

Okeeter Club 

Fereber 

Causeys 

Lawters 

Hardeville 

Purysburg 

Sand Island 

Ritters 

Drawdye 

Walterboro 

Meggetts 

Geratys 

Gibsons 

Youngs Island 

Wappoo 

Voorhees 

St. Andrews 

Stokes 

Raysor Junction 

Donelleys 

Williams 

Caldwell 

Lodge 

Ehrhardts.. 



;:■} 



3 
10 


1 
4 
8 


6 


4 


5 


6 


4 


4 


6 


4 


8 
8 
6 


5 
5 
3 


8 


5 


8 


5 


6 


4 


6 


4 


G 


4 



; 


"2 
2 
2 
2 

1 

23/s 


1 


1 




'7 

G 

5 
3 


R 






9, 








•> 








■>, 








'>, 








2 

2 

1 

2 

2 

2 

G 

6 
2 


fi 








1 








'>, 


2 

2 
1 








'> 








fl 








3 








3 








•>, 








1 








■>, 


y 2 








2 
2 


•2 









It is proper to note that the rates referred to in the fore- 
going cover every character of freight shipped and among 
the most important articles may be named Dry Goods, 
Groceries, Hardware, Stoves, Foundry Work, Vehicles, 
Paints, etc. 

REDUCTION IN RATES TO SEA BOARD AIR LINE STATIONS 
SOUTH OF COLUMBIA, FILE 23. 

The South Carolina Railroad Commission has ruled that 
joint rates over two or more railroads shall be made up of 
the sum of the two locals less 20 per cent. In checking up 
the rates to Seaboard Air Line stations south of Columbia 
we found that this rule had not been observed in making 
11 



162 



Mayor Smyth's Annual Review. 



the rates from Charleston to these points, and the question 
was taken up with the lines at interest and the following 
reductions made: 





l'KR HUNDRED POUNDS 


u 


- 
Per o . 

too wj§ 

lbs. --A 


Per 
Car 


- 

z ■ 
,-. / 
. £> 

Pm 


< :harleston, s. ('., 
and 


1 


■1 


3 


1 


f. 


6 


A 


B 


C 


D 


E 


II 


V 


K 


L 


M 


N 


O 


P 


if 
M 

33 


So" 


North S. C. 

Livingston * 

Neeces \" 

Norway ) 

Williams Spur. .. y 


1 
-1 

4 
I 


1 
i 

4 
4 


3 
5 

C 

(i 


1 
3 

2 
2 


1 

1 

1 
1 


1 


1 


1 


H 


'•-■ 


2 




1 


'4 




12 


80 


SO 


■in 


1 


1 


Otside j 

Govan | 

Lancaster > 

Roby 

Olar | 

Ulraers i 

Weekleys 1 

Sycamore . 













REDUCTIONS OF RATES BETWEEN CHARLESTON, S. C, AND 

SAXONS, S. C, FILE 24. 

Complaint was made by parties having contracts on the 
new water works of this city, that the rates from Charles- 
ton to Saxons were excessive. Upon investigation it was 
found that an error had been made in the pulication of the 
Atlantic Coast Line's mileage rate and that they were charg- 
ing for a twenty mile haul, when they should have charged 
for only eleven miles. The matter was presented to the 
traffic officials and they issued the correct rates, making the 
following reductions: 



Between 

Charleston, S. C, 

and 


PER HUNDRED POUNDS 


Per 
Bbl 


Per 

100 
Lbs 


Per Ton 

2,000 lbs 


Per Car 


1 


2 


3 


4 


;-> 


6 


A 


15 


c 


DjE 


B 


F 


K 


L 


M 


N 


O 


P 


Saxon S. C. 


11 


11 


8 


7 


6 


4 


•J 


4 


1 


1 


6 


17 


2 


2 


10 


15 


3 00 


2 00 


9 00 



REDUCTION OF CLASSIFICATION OF KEROSENE OIL, FILE 27. 

Complaint was made to the Bureau that the classification 
of kerosene oil was 3rd class in South Carolina, and 4th class 



Bureau of Freight and Transportation. 163 

in Georgia, thereby placing Charleston at a disadvantage. 
The matter was taken up with the South Carolina Railroad 
Commission and the classification reduced to 4th class, 
effective February 6th 1903. This change of classification 
will make an average reduction of the rates on this article 
of about 15 per cent. 

MINIMUM CARLOAD WEIGHT ON EXCELSIOR, FILE 59. 

Complaint was filed by manufacturers of excelsior on the 
minimum carload weight of excelsior in bales, the classifica- 
tion of the Eailroad Commission fixing said minimum at 
20,000 pounds per carload. It was claimed that this weight 
could not be loaded in one car and that the minimum should 
be reduced to 10,000 lbs. This matter was taken up on 
March 28th, and after lengthy correspondence the Railroad 
Commission fixed on June 30th, 1903, as the date for formal 
hearing at Columbia. Evidence was presented from manu- 
facturers, and it was found that the amount that could be 
loaded in a car by the different manufacturers averaged, 
about 15,000 lbs, and upon this evidence the Railroad Com- 
mission fixed 15,000 pounds as the minimum carload, thereby 
saving our manufacturers the payment on 5,000 pounds 
weight, or 25 per cent of the freight. 

REDUCTION OF RATES ON STARCH TO POINTS WITHIN THE 
STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA, FILE 60. 

The attention of the Bureau was called to the fact that the 
classification of starch in this state was much higher than 
that applied in the state of Georgia, and by reason of this 
condition our merchants could not ship to mill points. We 
at once took this matter up with the Railroad Commission 
requesting that the classification in this state be made the 
same as in Georgia, viz: less than carload 4th class instead 
of 3rd class; carload, class O, instead of 5th class. Cor- 
respondence with the Railroad Commission on this subject 
continued from February 24th, until June 10th, when we 
filed a formal petition with them asking that the classifica- 
tion on starch, in South Carolina, be made 



[64 Mayor Smyth's Annual Review. 

CARLOAD. LESS THAN CARLOAD. 

( !lass v !. 4th ('lass. 

Our petition was heard before the Railroad Commission 
on June 30th. The classification less than carload was re- 
duced to 4th class, effective July 15th, and this reduction of 
classification amounts to about 15 per cent reduction on the 
less than carload rate. On the carload classification a com- 
promise was made and a line of mileage rates adopted as 
follows: 

STARCH CARLOAD 30,000 POUNDS MINIMUM. 

DISTANCE. New Rate. Old Rate. Reduction. 

10 miles and under 9 9 

20 u " over 10 13 13 

30 " " " 21) 15 17 2 

40 " " " 30 17 10 2 

50 " " " 40 18 21 3 

(50 " " " 50 18 22 4 

70 " " < 00 19 23 4 

80 «• " " 70 19 24 5 

90 " " " 80 20 25 5 

100 " " " 90 20 20 G 

110 " '• . " 100 21 27 6 

120 " " " 110 21 28 7 

130 " " « 120 21 £ 29 7i 

140 " " " 130 2H 30 8^ 

150 " " " 140 22 31 9 

160 " " " 150 22 32 10 

170 " " " 100 22 32i m 

180 " " " 170 22£ 33 Wk 

190 " " " 180 22^ 33i 11 

200 ' " " 190 23 34- 11 

210 " " '200 23 34J 11£ 

220 " " " 2l0 23 35 12 

230 " " " 220 23i 35£ 12 

240 " " " 230 23^ 36 12J 

250 " " " 240 24 36^ 12* 

260 " «• " 250 24 37 13 

These reductions have induced quite a heavy movement 
of starch through this port that it would otherwise have 
heen impossible to have handled. 



Bureau of Freight and Transportation. 165 

KATES ON" BILLETS (HARDWOOD) VIZ: RED GUM, PERSIM- 
MON, DOGWOOD, ASH, HICKORY, OAK, POPLAR LOGS, 
AND BILLETS IN THE ROUND, CARLOAD MINIMUM 8 
CORDS, FILE NO. 79. 

Complaint was made to the Bureau that the railroads of 
this state were charging ou these articles the class P rate, 
carload minimum 10 cords, and that this rate was prohibitive. 
The question was at once taken up with the Railroad Com- 
mission and a hearing given at Columbia on April 21st 1903, 
a scale of rates was adopted fixing a per cord rate, minimum 
carload eight cords. Comparison showing reductions is not 
given as the old rates were on per 100 pounds basis, and 
new rates on per cord basis, but the figures adopted reduced 
the rates to a basis satisfactory to complainants. 

RATES ON COW PEAS FROM CHARLESTON, S. C, TO NEW 
ORLEANS, LA. FILE 84. 

On April 1st, 1903, we ascertained that the question of 
advancing the rates on Cow Peas from 22 cents per 100 lbs 
to 30 cents per 100 pounds from Charleston, S. C, to New 
Orleans, La., had been taken up by the Rail Lines from 
Charleston and the matter had been submitted to the lines 
at interest for their concurrence. We immediately took the 
matter up with the traffic officials of the Atlantic Coast Line 
and the Southern Rwy., calling their attention to the fact 
that by advancing Charleston's rates from 22 to 30 cents per 
100 lbs, and allowing the rate from Augusta, Ga., to remain 
at 22 cents, that it would permit a combination of rates from 
their local stations that would make is possible for Augusta 
to come within 22 miles of Charleston and buy peas and 
reship from Augusta to New Orleans at a less through rate 
of freight than could be obtained by our merchants by ship- 
ping to Charleston and reshipping from here. This showing 
had no effect and the rate was advanced, effective April 23rd, 
1903. We continued our efforts to have this rate properly 
adjusted and the rate from Charleston was reduced, effective 
November 22nd, 1903 to 24 cents per 100 lbs, and we are 
advised that the Augusta rate was also advanced to 24 cents 



L66 Mayor Smyth's Annual Review. 

per loo lbs, thereby placing Charleston again on an equal 
basis. Charleston lias in the past shipped about 3,000,000 
pounds of row peas annually to New Orleans, and the value 
of this adjustment can readily be seen. 

RATES ON LEAD PIPE. CHARLESTON, S. C, TO MEMPHIS, 
TENN., FILE 85 

The Bureau was requested to try and secure a better rate 

on lead pipe, Charleston, S. C, to Memphis, Tenn., it being 

suggested that a rate of 62 cents per 100 pounds, less than 

ear load, and 42 cents per 100 pounds, carload, the business 

from Charleston could be increased. The rate of 42 cents 

per 100 lbs, carload, was granted by the railroads effective 

September 1st, 1903, being a reduction of 12 cents per 100 

pounds. 

RATE ON COTTON COOSAWHATCHEE, S. C., TO CHARLESTON, 
S. C, FILE 100 

In checking up the Atlantic Coast Line's local cotton tariff 
we found that, through error, their published rate was 24 
cents per 100 pounds, the correct rate being 23 cents per 
100 pounds. This was promptly corrected and tariff issued 
making a reduction of one cent per 100 pounds. 

RATES ON WOODEN SPOOLS AND BOBBINS, CHARLESTON, 
S. C, TO NEW YORK, PHILADELPHIA AND BOSTON, FILE 104. 

A new industry for the manufacture of wooden spools 
and bobbins having recently begun operations, they were 
unable to compete with manufacturers at other points on 
the full class rates, and upon their request we took the matter 
up with the Clyde Steamship Company, and they expressed 
their willingness to co-operate in promoting any Charleston 
local enterprise, authorizing a rateof 23 cents per 100 pounds, 
a reduction of 5 cents per 100 pounds, which was satisfactory 
to the interested parties and has enabled them to largely 
extend their business. 

RATES BETWEEN CHARLESTON, S. C, AND C. & W. C. RAIL- 
ROAD STATIONS, FILE 144. 

The rates between Charleston, S. C, and Charleston and 
Western Carolina Railroad stations had been made up on 



Bureau of Freight and Transportation. 



167 



the old rates of the Charleston and Savannah Railroad and 
(J. & W. C. locals less 20 per cent, and after the local rates 
of the C. & S. division of the Atlantic Coast Line had 
been reduced they should have been readjusted to conform 
to the reduced rates. This was not done until the matter 
was taken up by the Bureau on July 14th, 1903, and the re- 
ductions not made effective until October 3rd, 1903, four 
months after they should have been put into effect. The 
reductions are sriven in the following table: 



Between 

Charleston, S. C. 

and 



PER HUND11ED POUNDS 



1 2 



D E H 



Per 
Obi 



Per 
100 
Lbs 



Per Ton 

2000 lbs 



M 



Per Car 



O P 



Per 
100 
Lbs 



Buttons SC 1 

Island Tank I 

Seabrook i 

Coosaw 

Sheldon 

Timothy. 

Davidson 

Early Branch... . 

Cummings 

McNeils 

Almeda 

Varnvllle 

Hampton 

Moulders Mill.. 

Brunson 

Appleton 

Beldoc 

Martins 

Averill 

Millett 

Hatteeville 



16 14 14 
18 16,18 



7 12 



7 6 
8| 6 

3 



1>4 2l£ 

mi 2 



m 



IVz 



22 



22 



•22 



34 120 
34 320 



120 



RATES ON CANNED GOODS FROM BALTIMORE TO CHARLES- 
TON, FILE 156. 

Effective July 24th, the Clyde Steamship Co., advanced 
the rates on canned goods from Baltimore to Charleston 
from 15 to 18 cents per 100 lbs. We took this matter up 
with the traffic officials of the Clyde Line, explaining, that, 
as Savannah had very low rates on this commodity from 
Baltimore that the advance meant a heavy loss of business 
from Charleston, and upon this presentation of the case the 
rates were reduced to 15 cents per 100 pounds, effective 
August 21st, 1903. 



168 Mayor Smyth's Annual Review. 

CLASS AN I) COMMODITY RATES BETWEEN CHARLESTON AND 
CHESTERFIELD AM) LANCASTER RAILROAD STATIONS 
FILE L54. 

A number of complaints were made to the Bureau that 

the rates between Charleston and stations on the Chesterfield 
and Lancaster Railroad were sueh as to operate against this 
city, and upon investigation we found that no through rates 
had been issued from Charleston, though we found that rates 
had, for a long time, been in effect from Norfolk and other 
Virginia cities. The failure to publish these rates caused 
much confusion to the local agents and nearly all shipments 
were overcharged. These rates were finally published, ef- 
fective November 5th, 1903; placing Charleston in a better 
position, though they are not yet in on the proper basis and 
are still the subject of correspondence. 

4TH, MATTERS TAKEN UP FOR CONSIDERATION 
NOT FAVORABLY CONSIDERED BY CARRIERS. 

SALT RATES TO CHARLOTTE, N. C, FTLE 1. 

This question was under consideration during 1902, and 
no decision rendered by the carriers, and was carried on 
during this year and considered by the lines at interest and 
they stated that if any reduction was made from Charleston 
it would be followed by a like reduction from Wilmington, 
N. C, and Norfolk. Va., and therefore would be of no benefit 
to Charleston. In view of other rates under consideration 
which would bear on this rate we thought best to let this 
question rest until the others were decided. 

RATES ON COAL FROM BIRMINGHAM DISTRICT TO CHARLES- 
TON, FJLE 3(>. 

Complaint was made to the Bureau that the rate on coal 
from Birmingham district to Charleston, was fifteen cents 
per ton higher than Savannah. This was found to be true, 
and the carriers stated that while the rates from Birmingham 
district to Charleston were higher than to Savannah, the 
rates from Coal Creek district to Savannah were 15 cents 
per ton higher than to Charleston, which equalized these 



Bureau of Freight and Transportation. 169 

rates. They further claimed that the coal companies adjust 
their prices in line with these rates and we were unable to 
make any change. 

MINIMUM CHARGE ON SINGLE SHIPMENTS, FILE 129. 
Effective May 12th, 1903, all transportation companies 
doing interstate business in the southeastern territory, 
changed their rule governing the minimum charge on single 
shipments weighing loss than 100 pounds. The old rule 
provided that the minimum charge on a single shipment 
of one class from one consignor should be computed at the 
actual weight at the class rate to which it belongs, but in no 
case less than twenty-five cents. The new rate provides that 
the full class or commodity rate shall be charged for 100 
pounds with a minimum of twenty-five cents. This is quite 
a hardship on parties getting out a great many small pack- 
ages, and although we have had the matter up, the lines at 
interest have been unable to have it changed. 

RATES FROM WESTERN AND NORTHWESTERN POINTS TO 
CHARLESTON, FILE 16. 

This question has been before the Bureau since its organ- 
ization, but nothing has yet been accomplished. In Novem- 
ber 1898 complaint was filed before the Inter-State Commerce 
Commission, asking that they require the railroads to put in 
effect from Western commercial centres to Charleston the 
same rates as are being made to Norfolk. This case has 
been heard but no decision yet rendered. A similar case 
was made by Wilmington and the Inter-State Commerce 
Commission rendered a decision favorable to Wilmington, 
but the railroads immediately took the matter to the courts, 
and an injunction was granted, and until the case is heard, 
there would be nothing accomplished by rendering a decision 
in the Charleston case, the same points being involved. 
RATES ON RICE FROM NEW ORLEANS TO CHARLESTON, FILE 12. 

The Bureau has had this question up for some months, 
and at one time we felt that there was some prospect of the 
all rail lines reducing these rates, but we have not yet suc- 
ceeded in accomplishing anything in this direction. 



I 7<> Mayor Smyth's Annual Review. 

ESTABLISHING A CLAIM BUREAU, FILE 137. 

At ii meeting of the Board of Commissioners on June 10th, 
;i resolution was adopted instructing your manager to com- 
municate with the merchants of Charleston offering: the 
services of the Bureau in the adjustment and collection of 
claims againsl the transportation lines doing business in this 
city. A circular was issued and sent to the merchants. 
Since this time the Bureau has assisted in the settlement of 
a number of claims, amounting to two hundred and ninety- 
one ($291.00) dollars. There are still pending fourteen claims 
amounting to three hundred and seventy dollars ($370.00), 
sonic of which will he adjusted in a short time, others will 
probably have to be handled by an attorney. 

QUOTING RATES, FILE 2. 

By reason of the Bureau being without a manager for two 
years the freight tariffs were not kept up, and as the trans- 
portation companies did not respond to our requests for 
tariffs cheerfnlly and promptly, it required a large amount 
of correspondence to get this department in proper shape, 
but we now have a full line of rates, and have been able to 
quote rates whenever called upon, and a great many of our 
merchants have availed themselves of this privilege. 

SCHEDULES, FILE 9. 

During 1902 and the first five months of 1903, the service 
to and from Charleston was such as to bring forth vigorous 
complaints from nearly all the jobbers and manufacturers 
in the city, stating that their business was being seriously 
injured by unnecessary and unreasonable delay in delivery. 
The matter was taken up with the transportation depart- 
ments of the railroads entering this city, resulting in a con- 
ference at which it was agreed by the railroads that a favor- 
able schedule would be arranged, and a svstem ofloaclino- less 
than carload shipments adopted, which would correct the 
trouble complained of. These changes were made effective 
during the latter part of May and have to a large extent, cor- 
rected the trouble complained of, but the question of sched- 



Buureau of Freight and Transportation. 171 

ules is still a serious one, and has not yet been satisfactorily ar- 
ranged. One case in point is the schedule between Charleston 
and the Pregnall branch of the Atlantic Coast Line, same be- 
ing from Charleston to Holly Hill, thirty-four hours and thir- 
ty-five minutes. The actual running time from Charleston to 
Holly Hill is ten hours and thirty minutes, and the delay is 
caused by a break in the schedule at Sumter six hours and 
thirty-five minutes, and at Creston, seventeen hours and 
twenty minutes. The schedule from Holly Hill to Charles- 
ton is forty one hours and twenty-one minutes. The actual 
running time is thirteen hours and twenty-six minutes. 
There is a break in this schedule at Creston of twenty-two 
hours and fifty minutes and at Sumter of five hours and five 
minutes. From this it will be seen that the time consumed 
between Charleston and these points could be reduced two 
thirds and it is claimed that freight can come from Richmond 
to these points in less time than from Charleston. A petition 
was filed with the South Carolina Railroad Commission by 
merchants doing business on this line, in October, asking 
that this schedule be corrected, but no action has been taken 
up to this time. 

SHORTAGE OF CAR SUPPLY, FILES 55 AND 97. 

During the fall and winter of each year the supply of 
empty cars has not been sufficient to fill the demands and has 
resulted in great inconvenience and loss to our merchants and 
during the season of 1902 — 3 this supply was unusually short 
effecting both incoming and outgoing business. Several 
conferences were held with the railroad officials, resulting 
in some improvement in the situation, but not entirely cor- 
recting it, and, apparently, the only effective remedy will be 
a legislative act, providing a penalty for failure to furnish 
within a reasonable time equipment to move business offering. 

CHECKING EXPENSE BILLS AND PREPAID BILLS OF LADING. 

We believe that a great deal could be saved to the mer- 
chants if their freight bills and prepaid bills of lading were 
properly checked by experts familiar with tariffs and classi- 



» 



\ i - Mayor Smyth's Annual Review. 

tication. The Bureau is equipped with the latest tariff and 
classification issues and will cheerfully perform this duty Cor 
any of our merchants who desire to make use of our services. 

EXPENSES. 

The expenses of 1 lie Bureau from January 1st to December 
31st, 1903, amounted to $6,202.82 including unpaid hills 
amounting to about $75.00. 

In addition to the different matters presented in detail in 
this report, the Bureau has handled many other matters of 
minor importance, which, we believe, has been of material 
assistance to the interested parties. 

In presenting this report we have endeavored to be as brief 
as possible, and at the same time give a clear idea of the 
general operation of the Bureau. 

The Board of Commissioners have at all times cheerfully 
responded to all calls made upon them, and whatever success 
has attended our efforts, is largely due to their hearty co- 
operation. 

Respectfully submitted, 

II. R. JACKSON, 

Manager. 
Endorsed by the Board. 

G. WALTER McIVER, Chairman; 

Young Men's Business League. 
F. S. HANCKEL, 

City Council. 
GEO. B. EDWARDS, 

Chamber of Commerce. 
E. C. HESSE, 

Cotton Exchange. 
C. BISSELL JENKINS, 

Commercial Club. 
H. F. BREMER, 

Merchants Exchange. 



Report of Sewer Commissioners. 173 



REPORT OF SEWER COMMISSIONERS. 



18 Montague Street, Charleston, S. 0., March 21, 1904. 
To His Honor the Mayor and City Council of Charleston : 

Gentlemen : We have the honor to present this the Ninth 
Annual Report of the Board of Sewer Commissioners for 
the year 1903 and append the report of Mr. John Gadsden, 
Engineer in charge. We would again report that all em- 
ployed upon the system have discharged all duties faithfully 
and most efficiently. Now that an ample water supply has 
been obtained by the City Council, and available for all 
needs of our citizens, and the extra expense of storage 
tanks can be avoided, there seems to be no obstacle in the 
way for the general use of the sewerage system by all resi- 
dents of the southern portion of the city now provided with 
sewers, and that the use of all privies and dry wells be pro- 
hibited by the Board of Health and your honorable body. 
We would respectfully report some opposition from some 
of our citizens to compulsory use of the sewers, as some 
expense will have to be incurred by the householders in 
making such connections, but the sanitary advantages of 
'having our premises freed! from the foul privies and dry 
wells now polluting soil, water and air, our death rate must 
decrease when such conditions are abated, and our city ad- 
vance in commercial prosperity when our death rate is re- 
duced and can compare with other cities less favorably 
situated, but who are blessed with pure water and sewer- 
age systems that have improved the public health. There 
is also an economical consideration, the first costs of in- 
stalling in each house proper modern sanitary water closets 
and appliances, while adding to the comfort and health of 
the occupants by prompt removal of household waste and 
human excreta that such expense incurred in the first costs 
will be materially reduced in the annual expenses of clean- 
ing out the present receptacles of filth. No city can pros- 



171 Mayor Smyth's Annual Review. 

per or increase unless provided with a full and sufficient 
water supply and a proper system of sewers. The several 
commercial problems presented at various liincs recently for 
the advaneement of our wealth and commerce all have failed 
le propose any measure for reducing our death rate by prop- 
er sanitation, so essential to material progress. We would 
Respectfully urge the extension of the sewers. This will not 
rued a large amount of outlays of money, as each district 
or parts of districts can be constructed and gradually ad- 
vanced until the whole city is completely sewered. The pres- 
ent steam power is sufficient for the entire completed sys- 
tem. Pipes and ejectors for each district will be needed 
and the sewers used as soon as these are provided and con- 
nected gradually. Health and prosperity will again place 
our city in the commercial plane so much desired. 
Respectfully, 

T. GRANGE SIMONS, M. P., 
Chairman Sewer Commissioners. 



Report of Sewer Commissioners. 175 

City of Charleston, "Sewerage Department, 

Charleston, S. C, January 11, 1904. 

To Dr. T. Grange Simons, Chairman, and the Board of Sew- 
er Commissioners : 

Gentlemen : I have the honor of submitting herewith the 
Ninth Annual Report of the Sewerage Department for the 
year ending December 31, 1903 : 

The financial statement accompanying shows that this 
Department has not expended $273 49-100 of the |3,850 ap- 
propriated by the City for its use during 1903. 

By comparing this statement with that of previous years 
it will be found that we are running the system more eco 
nomical without in any way impairing its efficiency. 

On March 26, 1903, a communication from Hon. J. Adger 
Sinythe, Mayor, to Dr. T. Grange Simons, Chairman, was re- 
ferred to me. The communication instructed me to turn 
over to the Superintendent of Streets all material of this de- 
partment at the Upper Market that I could not remove and 
store. This necessitated the erection of a store-shed on the 
lot of the Power House, Price's Alley, which shed was built, 
as far as practical, with lumber of the department then at 
Upper Market. 

I herewith submit a list of articles removed from Upper 
Market to Price's Alley, also the number of clay and iron 
pipe and other material turned over to the Superintendent 
of Streets, for which I hold his receipt. 

I further submit a list of pipe and other material delivered 
between 1895 and 1902 to the Superintendent of Streets as 
per his orders, which are on file in this office. 

J regret that a great many of the citizens, in the section 
provided with the sewerage system, still fail to see the neces- 
sity of connecting with it and proving its advantages. 

The accompanying table shows the height, in feet, water 
could have risen in a pipe connected with the water main at 
the corner of Broad and Meeting streets. It is based upon 
tlie water pressure as indicated by "Bristol's Recording 
Guage," located in the basement of the City Hall. 

Respectfully submitted, 

JOHN GADSDEN, C. E., 
Superintendent of Sewers. 



17»'> Mayor Smyth's Annual Review. 

REPORT TO BOARD SEWER COMMISSIONERS. 
Shewing Monthly Disbursements in this Department, 1903. 

January $ 308 00 

February 298 08 

March 333 04 

April 332 43 

May 200 17 

June 303 87 

July 280 67 

August 273 93 

September 277 88 

October 304 02 

November 274 23 

December 289 50 

Total $3,576 51 

Amount appropriated by City for 1903 $3,850 00 

Amount Expended in 1003 3,576 51 

Surplus not expended $ 273 40 

Supplies on hand January 1, 1903 $ 143 95 

Supplies on hand January 1, 1904 47 00 

Appropriation of 1903 expended $3,576 51 

Supplies and materials on hand Jan. 1, 1903, and receipts.... 108.26 

Actual (lost of System 1003 $3,684 77 



Report of Sewer Commissioners. 



177 



Summary of Expenditures of Sewerage Department for 1903. 

Salary Superintendent of Sewers $1,000 00 

Salary Engineer at $75 a month 900 00 

Salary two Firemen at $40 a month each. . 960 00 

$ 2,860 00 

Power House Supplies- 
Packing 6 80 

Waste 9 01 

Light Oil 12 00 

White Oil 22 88 

97 Tons Coal 475 75 

$ 526 44 

Power House Repairs — 

To New Smoke Stack 43 25 

To 2 Asbestos Plug Cock 3 48 

To Water Guage 1 25 

To Renewing Piston Rod 8 29 

To Miscellaneous 2 31 

$ 58 58 

Power House Equipment — 

To 8 Grate Bars 5 25 

To 80 Pound Anvil 6 00 

To 25 feet Water Hose 3 75 

To 2 Lathe Tools 3 20 

To 2 Lanterns and Shades 3 25 

To 6 Brooms 2 40 

To Sundries 3 79 

$ 27 64 

Ejector— To Gum Cloth \ 5 07 

System — 

To Sand Scoop 4 25 ♦ 

To 400 feet % Rope 2 55 

To Sundries 3 84 

$ 10 64 

Office Supplies — 

To Stationery 9 10 

To Reference Books 9 00 

$ 18 10 

Miscellaneous — 

To Telephone 8 00 

To Repairing Clock 1 00 

To five day Laborers 6 25 

To Erecting Shed 30 41 

To Ice for Power House 5 20 

To 2 Sashes for Power House 2 75 

To Removing Material for Upper Market.. .. 12 50 

To Rubber Boots 3 00 

To Cement and Fire Brick 93 

$ 70 04 



12 



$ 3,576 51 



L78 Mayor Smyth's Ainmnl Review. 



Ma tenia] t|f Sewerage Department Stored ;U Upper Ma/rkel turned over 
to Superintendent of Streets June 2nd, L903. 

1 Piece 6 ,, x2y 3 / Montague Clay Pipe. 

1, 307 Pieces 8"x2y,' Montague Clay Pipe. 

1 Pieces lo"v_"..' Montague Clay Pipe. 
") Pieces 12"x2y>' Montague Clay Pipe. 

385 Pieces 15"x2y 3 ' Montague Clay Pipe. 

32 Pieces 4"x2y 3 6" y's Montague Clay Pipe . 
700 Piece- 8"x2y/ 0" y Montague Clay Pipe. 

Hi Pieces I2"x2y 3 ' (i" y Montague Clay Pipe. 

!>."> Piece- L5"x2y>' 6" y Montague Clay Pipe. 
348 Pieces li" Pen- Montague Clay Pipe. 
200 Pieces (i" (oxers Montague Clay Pipe. 
P23 Pieces 8" Covers Montague Clay Pipe. 

22 Pieces 0"xl2' 3" Cast Iron Water Pipes. 
."> Pieces S" 12' 3" Cast Iron Water Pipes. 

■21 Plank 2"xl2"x20", 
8 Loads Lumber. 

Material of Sewerage Department Removed from Upper Market to 
Power House, Price's Alley. 

3 Loads Lumber G"x4"x20' and 2"xl2"x20'. 
(i Barrels Pitch, half Barrel Rosin. 

7 Barrels Asphalt. 

:> Tool Poxes and a few Tools. 

2 Syphons for Rhoads Williams' Plush Tank. 

2 Bells for Rhoads Williams' Plush Tank. 

3 B*ells for Miller Flush Tank. 

2 Syphons for Miller Plush Tank. 

4 Manholes, Manhole Covers. 

1 Lot Long and Short Handle Shovels. 
Roes. 

'.) Zinc Pump "bad condition." 

3 Large Iron Pumps "•broken." 

8 8x12' 3" Cast Iron Water Pipes. 

2 Barrels Clay Pips Covers 6". 
Roll of Sheet Lead. 

Materia] of Sewerage Department Delivered to Superintendent of 
Streets LTpon His Order Between Years 1895 and 1902. 

110 Pieces 6"x2 1 / 2 / Montague Clay Pipe. 
1,682 Pieces 8"x2y 2 ' Montague Clay Pipe. 
000 Pieces 10"x2y 2 ' Montague Clay Pipe. 
11 Pieces 12"x2y/ Montague Clay Pipe. 



Report of Sewer Commissioners. 179 

92 Pieces 15'x2y/ Montague Clay Pipe. 
50 Pieces 16'x2%' Montague Clay Pipe. 

3 Pieces 4'x2y 8 " 6" y Montague Clay Pipe. 
26 Pieces 8x2% 6" y Montague Clay Pipe. 
85 Pieces 10x2y» 0" y Montague Clay Pipe. 
10 Pieces 12x2% 6" y Montague Clay Pipe. 

2 Pieces 6' Bens. 

6 Wheelbarrows. 

Respectfully submitted, 

JOHN GADSDEN, C. E., 

Superintenent of Sewers. 



ISO 



Mayor Smyth's Annual Review 



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Mayor Smyth's Annual Review 



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L84 Mayor S7riytK > & Annual Review. 



REPORT OF TIDAL DRAIN KEEPER. 

Charleston, 8. C, January 1st, 1D04. 

To his Honor the Mayor and City Council : 

Gentlemen — I have the honor to submit the following 
report of the proceedings of this department for the past 
year. Appropriation allowed and designated as follows, viz : 

To cleaning out drains .$4,400 00 

" Tidal Drain Keeper's Salary '..... 900 00 

" Repairing of Drains 050 00 

Total Allowance , ..$5,950 00 

Amount of money expended for material, for repairing 
drains Sand Pits, etc. 

Jan. 8. C. S. Pitcher $ 5 25 

" 15. Thos. Hughes 59 72 

" 26. C. E. Welling 4 32 

" 27. Charleston Iron Works, forging and 

drilling straps for boxes 75 09 

Feb. 9. Leland Moore Paint & Oil Company. . . 25 43 

■• 10. John J. Furlong 8 50 

" 10. Charleston Iron Works repairs to wind- 
lass 15 34 

" 13. E. L. Halsey 33 47 

" 25. Thos. Hughes 3 75 

Moh. 14. Lelan 1 More Paint & Oil Co 9 75 

" 31. Thos. Hughes 9 50 

" 27. John J. Furlong 2 25 

7. Leland Moore Paint & Oil Company. . . 7 55 

" 9. Charleston Iron Works, repair to hoist- 
ing buckets 19 43 

" 12. James Heffron 50 

Apr. 2. Thos. Hughes 17 50 

4 ' 9. Strohecker & McDermid 2 80 

June 1. Strohecker & McDermid 2 50 

" 5. Thos. Hughes 42 18 

Oct. 2. Thos. Hughes 1 30 

Nov. 2. Thos. Hughes 12 58 

' ' 27. Leland Moore Paint & Oil Co 3 13 

' ' 24. Strohecker & McDermid 3 70 

" 24. Charleston Iron Works, man-hole rings, 

covers, etc 97 05 



.Report of Tidal Drain Keeper. 185 

Dec. 15. Charleston Iron Works, 4 Sand pit cov- 
ers 3x6x4x6=2,252 pounds @ 2£. . . . 56 31 

Drayage 2 25 

" 15. Thos. Hughes 8 00 

" 14 and 29 Thos. Hughes 65 80 

" 12. John J. Furlong 3 50 

Bills contracted by Mr. Koster. 

Charleston Iron Works $ 93 45 

C. E. Welling 19 43 

Thos. Hughes 50 35 

$762 28 

To Cleaning out drains $2,917 38 

Amount expended for labor in repairing drains, sand 

pits and building four new gates . . 555 21 

Two Drain Hands for year 730 00 

T D. Keeper's Salary 900 00 

$5,864 87 

Total Allowance . . .$5,950 00 

Amount Used 5,864 87 

Balance on hand $ 85 13 

Respectfully submitted, 

WM. P. McMAHON, 

Tidal Drain Keeper. 



186 Mayor Smyth's Annual Review 



PUBLIC MARKETS. 



Market Hall, December 31, L903. 

To the Commissioners of the Public Markets: 

Gentlemen — In accordance with law, I herein 7 submit a 
statement of the transactions of this oth'ee from January 1, 
1903 to December 31, 11)03. 

Collections from Fish and Vegetables $ 635 11 

Centre Beef ami Pork Markets 2,280 90 

Weights and Measures and Scale Fees 200 00 

Mount Pleasant Ferry Company 200 04 

Fish Licenses 100 00 

$3,360 05 
Deposited with City Treasurer $3,366 05 



$3,306 05 $3,300 05 
Expenditures. 

Wages to hands and 3 Clerks $3,640 08 

Repairs and Sundry Expenses 674 28 

#4,314 36 

Appropriation $4,400 00 

Total Expenditures , . 4,314 36 

Balance carried back to Income Account $ 85 64 

Respectfully submitted, 

JOHN P. O'NETLL, 
Chief Clerk Public Markets. 
W. H. Welch, for Finance Com. 



Management of Convict?. 187 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONERS. FOR THE 

MANAGEMENT, CARE AND CUSTODY 

OF CONVICTS. 



Charleston, S. C, January 1, 1904. 
To the Honorable Mayor and Aldermen of City Council-. 

Gentlemen : The annual report of this commission for 
the year ending December 31, 1903, is herewith submitted, 
showing the condition of the Chain Gang, the character and 
location of work performed, and an itemized statement of 
the expense of maintaining same. 

The number of convicts received during the year was 754, 
from the following sources : 

General Sessions Court None. 

Recorder Court 660 

Magistrates Court 94 

Total 754 

Of these GOO were colored and 94 white men, no females 
having been sent to the gang during the year. 

Average number of convicts per day 31 

Largest number of convicts any one day Q . . . . 55 

Smallest number of convicts any one day. ., 20 

The health of the prisoners for the year has been good, 
with an average per day of seven sick and one death. 



l sv > Mayor Smyth's Annual Review. 

LOC \ TION \M) (liAi; \< TKI; OF WORK. 

January -Ashley Avenue and Race Sheet, covering garbage, ete., 
under the direction of Superintendent of Streets. 

February Fishburne and Tracy Streets, grading and piling sand. 
Under directions of the Superintended of Streets. 

March Fishburne Street, City Park or Exposition Grounds, cleaning 
up and grading. Under direction of Superintendent of Streets. 

April City Park, cleaning up, grading, etc. Under directions of Chair- 
man of Park Commissioners. 

May City Park, cleaning up, grading, etc. Under directions Chairman 
Park Commissioners. 

June — City Park. Tinder Chairman of Commissioners of Parks. Also 
west of Ashley Avenue, from Calhoun to Sumter Street, Rutledge 
Avenue to Schutzenplatz, across Mount Pleasant Street to Meeting, 
cutting grass, cleaning and grading. 

July — Meeting Street Road, Fishburne, Tracy and Shepard Streets. 
Cutting down and grading streets. Under direction of Superintendent of 
Streets. 

August — Fishburne lot, from Boundary down King and all cross 
streets, also draining Noisette's Farm, City Park across Grove Street 
to Brandt's Farm. 

September — Meeting Street Road and all cross streets, working road 
to Country Club, cutting grass, cleaning streets, roads, etc. Under direc- 
tion of Superintendent of Streets. 

October — Mt. Pleasant Street to the rear of Schuetzenplatz lane, Rut- 
ledge Avenue and all cross streets, clearing out ditches, grading and 
cleaning streets. Under direction of Superintendent of Streets. 

November — Hampton Park. Under direction Chairman of Park Com- 
missioners. Also ten men working on Carolina Street. Under direction 
of Superintendent of Streets. 

December- -Hampton Park and Carolina Street. Under instructions of 
Chairman of Park Commissioners, under direction of Superintendent of 
Streets. 



Management of Convicts. 189 

FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 

Amount of appropriation $4,750 00 

Expenditures — 

Salary, Superintendent $ 900 00 

Salaries, Guards 5,000 00 

Salary, Secretary : 300 00 

Transportation of food 180 00 

Clothing 125 00 

Tin buckets 16 00 

Soap 32 50 

Needles, Thread and Buttons 1130 

Repairing guns 12 00 

Belts 30 60 

Shackles.. 55 00 

Repairs old shackles 26 10 

Padlocks 2 50 

Rivets, washers and gun oil and repairs iron closet 9 45 

Stationery and printing 8 00 

Amount unexpended 41 55 

$4,750 00 

All of wfyidi is respectfully submitted. 

J. H. THAYER, Chairman. 



l!)0 Mayor Smyth's Annual Review. 



PLANTING AND PROTECTION OF SHADE TREES. 

REPORT OF COMMISSIONERS. 

Charleston, S. (\, January 1, 1904. 

To the Honorable the Mayor and Aldermen of the City 
( 'ouncil of ( harleston : 

Gentlemen: The Commissioners for the Planting and 
Protection of Shade Trees have (he lienor to present here- 
with their Animal Report. For the past one or two years 
your Commissioners have 4 called your attention to the large 
number of new and growing trees, and also of old trees, 
which needed boxing, and stated that for several years to 
come a liberal appropriation should he made annually to give 
them protection for their preservation, and against injury. 
Last year we asked for one thousand dollars. You appro- 
priated eight hundred dollars, with which we purchased 
and planted 177 new trees as follows: 

Water Oaks. 3 in Legare Street and 29 in Ashley Avenue; 
Willow Oaks, 2 corner East and South Battery and 142 in 
'Rutledge Avenue; Hackberry, 1 in Meeting Street. Eight 
hundred and fifty-nine new boxes were placed around trees 
in 4 ( .) streets and whitewashed, 20 dead trees were cut down 
.and many trees trimmed under our supervision. We were 
also obliged to have such trees as interfered with the wires 
of Telegraph, Telephone and Trolley lines trimmed, in some 
instances even at the risk of marring the symmetry of the 
trees. 

In the eleven years of the existence of the Commission, 
it has planted 4,845 new trees, and there continues to be 
a great demand from residents whose streets or vicinity 
have been overlooked or neglected, but of course, with the 
limited amounts placed at its disposal, it will be years 
before many miles of streets can receive proper attention, 
as only a little can be done each year. Trees thrive unusu- 
ally well in our streets, but the chief trouble is with the 



Planting and Protection of Shade Trees. 191 

drivers of delivery wagons, who frequently, by reckless driv- 
ing, break down the boxes and injure the trees, or leave their 
horses unattended in the streets, giving them the opportu- 
nity and temptation to bite and injure such trees as may 
be unprotected. Council has, at the request of the Oommis- 
•sioners, passed all needful ordinances for the punishment or 
such injury, but it is almost impossible to detect the guilty 
parties, as they drive off rapidly as soon as the injury is 
done, and proof of the responsibility can not be fixed. Or 
the appropriation of $800 last year fully f 150 were expended 
in destroying the successive broods of caterpillars, and the 
Commissioners expended $28.83 more than the appropria- 
tion. 

We ask for $1,000 for the year 1904. 
Respectfully submitted, 

ZIMMERMAN DAVIS, 
C. A. CHISOLM, 
C. R. VALK, 

Commissioners. 



19l! Mayor Smyth's Annual Review. 



HARBOR MASTER'S REPORT, 



Office of Harbor Master. 

Charleston, S. C, January 11, 1904. 

To the Honorable the Mayor and the Aldermen of Charles- 
Ion, s. C. 

Gentlemen — I have the honor to submit the accompany- 
ing report of the arrivals of vessels at this port for the year 
ending December 31st, 1903. 

I am, Gentlemen, yours respectfully, 

JAMES ARMSTRONG, 

Harbor Master. 



Harbor Master's Report. 



193 



No. 1. 



MONTHS 











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Nationality 



January . . . 
February. . 
March. 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August. 
September. 
October . 
November 
December . 

Totals 



43 


10 


1 




110,115 


36 


19 






99,731 


41 


9 


1 




109,734 


41 


18 




2 


111.675 


37 


10 


1 




99,986 


31 


13 


1 




88 921 


33 


17 


2 


1 


94,686 


36 


10 


1 




98,025 


37 


15 






110,288 


46 


19 


2 




122,986 


38 


16 






107,727 
105 013 


38 


16 










456 


172 


9 


3 


1,260 887 



United States 



No. 2. 



MONTHS 





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January. . . 
February . 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August . . . 
September 
October. . . 
November 
December. 

Total . 

13 



4 

2 
1 
2 
4 
3 
3 
2 
4 
1 
3 
3 


"l 
1 


1 












1 

1 










1 

2 
1 


















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7,694 
3,444 
829 
2,510 
6,394 
6.191 
5,936 
4,802 
8,324 
3,307 
2,170 
6,586 

58,187 



British 



L94 



Mayor Smyth's Animal Review, 



No. 3. 



MONTHS 











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January. . . 
January.. . 
January.. . 
January. . . 
January. . . 
January.. . 
February . 
February.. 
February . 
March ... . 
.March . . . 
March 
March 

April 

April 

May 

May 

June.. 

June 

July 

July 

July 

August . . . 
August . . . 
October. . . 
November. 
November 
December. 



Totals 



14 



1,547 
798 
1,465 
2,337 
3,363 
2,735 
1,435 
1,152 
715 
1,864 
1,089 
1,686 
1 817 
1,480 
1,398 
1,138 
1,292 
1,975 
3,873 
3,138 
2,219 
2,159 
1,206 
802 
233 
1,601 
362 
1,132 

46.01l| 



Danish 

Uruguan 

German 

Austrian 

Norwegian 

Spanish 

Italian 

Dutch 

N orwegian 

Norwegian 

German 

Swedish 

Austrian 

German 

Norwegian 

Norwegian 

German 

Norwegian 

Chilian 

German 

Norwegan 

Danish 

Norwegian 

Italian 

Danish 

Swedish 

Norwegian 

Norwegian 



Department of Charities. 195 

THE DEPARTMENT OF CHARITIES. 



CHARLESTON ORPHAN HOUSE. 

To the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of Charleston-. 

Charleston, S. C, January 1, 1904. 

(tENtlemen : I have the honor to present herewith a state- 
ment of the Receipts and Expenditures of the Charleston 
Orphan House for 1903. Also the Reports of the various 
Standing Committees for the fiscal year ending December 
31st, 1903, with the annexed statement of the Commissioners' 
Trust Fund. F. J. PELZER, 

Chairman Board Commissioners of the Charleston Orphan 

House. 

PRESENT BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS. 

F. J. PELZER, Chairman. 

Dr. J. ^. BUIST, Vice Chairman. 

V. C. DIBBLE, Chairman Pro Tern. 
A. F. C. CRAMER. I. W. HIRSCH. 

ROBT. C. LEBBY. Dr. B. A. MUCKENFUSS. 

A. T. SMYTHE. T. A. WILBUR. 

F. Q. O'NEILL. S. G. STONEY. 

GEO. W. WILLIAMS. 

PRESENT OFFICERS. 

Miss A. K. IRVING, Principal and Superintendent. 

Teachers. 

Miss Mary L. LeQuex. Mrs. Amelia L. Reilly. 

Miss Catherine Arnold. Miss Mary McNeill. 

Miss Mary E. Hamlin. Miss Kate Lent. 

Kindergarten — Miss Ellen King. 

Matrons. 

Mrs. M. F. Perry. Mrs. M. P. Shaw. 

Miss L. McDermid. Miss M. Jefferson. 



L96 Mayor Smyth's Annual Review. 

Dr. W. II. HUGER, 
Physician of the Institution. 

ST. JOHN P. KINLOCH, 
Secretary and Treasurer of the Board. 

ASHLEY L. BARTON, 
Engineer. 

COMMITTEE ON IMPROVEMENT AND DISCIPLINE. 

F. J. PELZER, Ex Officio Chairman. 
B. A. Muekenfuss. T. A. Wilbur. 

A. h\ C. Cramer. -I. S. JJuist. 

A. T. Smythe. V. C. Dibble. 

F. Q. O'Neill. I. W. Hirsch. 

COMMITTEE ON SCHOOLS. 

J. S. Buist, Chairman. \*. A. Muekenfuss. 

G. W. Williams. V. C. Dibble. 

A. T. Smythe. 

COMMITTEE ON RETRENCHMENT AND REFORMS. 

F. Q. O'Neill, Chairman. T. A. Wilbur. 

A. F. C. Cramer. Robt. C. Lebby. 

BINDING OFT COMMITTEE. 

V. C. Dibble, Chairman. A. T. Smythe. 

I. W. Hirsch. Robt. C. Lebby. 

COMMITTEE ON REPAIRS. 

A. F. C. Cramer, Chairman. 
I. W. Hirsch. S. G. Stoney. 

COMMITTEE ON PURVEYANCE. 

T. A. Wilbur, Chairman. 

A. F. C. Cramer. S. G. Stoney. 

COMMITTEE ON ACCOUNTS. 

I. W. Hirsch, Chairman. J. S. Buist. 

B. A. Muekenfuss. G. W. Williams. 



Department of Charities. 197 



COMMITTEE ON CHAPEL AND ANNIVERSARY. 

B. A. Muckenfuss, Chairman. J. S. Buist. 
F. Q. O'Neill. . V. C. Dibble. 

COMMITTEE ON LIBRARY. 

A. T. Smythe, Chairman. V. C. Dibble. 

T. A. Wilbur. F. Q. O'Neill. 



Statement of Receipts and Expenditures of the Charleston 
Orphan House for the year ending December 31, 1903. 

RECEIPTS. 

To amount received from interest on public fund $ 9,595 26 

To amount received Commissioners' Trust Fund 3,056 26 

Balance from City Council 10,857 32 

Total $23,509 53 

EXPENDITURES. 

By amount expended as per monthly returns to City Council. $18,703 27 

By Physician's Salary 700 00 

By Insurance Premium on Building for five years 1,050 00 

By amount expended from Commissioners' Trust Fund, as per 

return to Council 1,545 01 

By purchase of 4 per cent Bonds for Commissioners' Trust 

Fund 1,511 25 

Total $23,509 53 



L98 Mayor Smyth's Annual Review. 

Cash transactions of the Trustees Charleston Orphan 
llousr Fund and Estate, from January lsl, L903, i<> Decern 
her 31st, L903. 



DR. 

To cash from last annual statement $ 8 54 

Donation account, Est. Geo. W. Williams 5,000 00 

Interest Account — 
Twelve months interest. $190,200, 4 per cent bonds. $7,848 00 

Six months interest, $1,500, 4 per cent bonds .'50 00 

Twelve months interest, $38,176 20. 4% per cent 

State Stock 1,717 95 

$ 9,595 95 
Deposits 153 82 

$14,758 31 
CR. 
By Bond Account — 

Purchased $1,500 00 4 per cent. City of Charleston $ 1,500 00 

Interest Account — 

Paid over to City for current expenses Orphan House 9,595 95 

Balance 3,662 36 

$14,758 31 

ASSETS. 

Cash $ 3,662 36 

Four per cent Bonds City Charleston 197,700 00 

Four and one-half per cent Bonds State South 

Carolina 38,176 20 

Respectfully submitted, 

J. O. LEA, City Treasurer. 
Examined and found correct, 

FRANCIS J. PELZER. 
Chairman Commissioners Charleston Orphan House and 
Trustee Charleston Orphan House Fund and Estate. 



Department of Charities. 199 

List of Stocks, Bonds and other Securities, belonging to 
the Private Fund of the Commissioners of the Charleston Or- 
phan House, exhibited to ns by St. John P. Kinloch, Treas- 
urer, and deposited in box at Ger mania Savings Bank, this 
22nd day of December, 1903 : 



5G City of Charleston 4 per cent bonds, each $1,000 $50,000 

18 City of Charleston 4 per cent bonds, each 500 0,000 

5 City of Charleston 4 per cent bonds, each 100 500 

1 Certificate State of South. Carolina stock, 4 1 /, per 

cent 4,500 

1 Certificate for 20 Shares Magnolia Cemetery Stock.. 100 2,000 

1 Certificate for four Shares Bank of Charleston Stock. . 400 

1 Certificate for one-half Share Bank of Charleston Stock 50 
1 Deed for six lots in Magnolia Cemtery. 

Examined and found correct. 

I. W. HIRSCH, Chairman. 
GEO. W. WILLIAMS, 
J. S. BUIST, 
B. A. MUCKENFUSS, 

Committee on Accounts. 
FRANCIS J. PELZER, 
Chairman Board of Commissioners. 



200 Mayor Smyth's Annual Review. 

Abstracts of the Receipts and Expenritures of the Private 
Fund of i lie < Commissioners of I he ( 'harleston Orphan House 
for the year ending December 31, 190:5 : 



di:. 

To balance from lasi year's account $1,202 10 

To received from interest on investments 2,917 50 

Total $4,119 60 

CB. 

By paid for Music and Librarian $ 350 16 

By paid tuition and expenses L»irl at Wintbrop 

College 60 00 

By paid funeral expenses one boy 28 00 

T'>\ paid care lot Magnolia Cemetery 30 00 

By paid rent box ;il Germania Bank 5 00 

By paid seeds and plants for garden 44 17 

By paid repairs to school room piano 11 00 

By paid eye glasses for girl ,2 50 

By paid expenses excursion on steamer Planter. ... 10 00 

By paid expenses annual picnic at Otranto 181 62 

By paid City Directory 3 00 

By paid flowers for funeral George \V. Williams.. .. 20 00 
By paid publishing memorial resolutions (\. \V. Egan 

and Geo. W. Williams 26 75 

By paid picture of Orphan House in needle work.. 50 00 

By paid inscriptions on tablets in hall 44 47 

By paid donations to teachers and pupils 582 00 

By paid books for library and school .*.... 90 63 

By paid expenses binding out committee 3 21 

By paid purchase $1,500 City 4 per cent bonds.. .. 1,511 25 

By paid postage stamps and sundries 2 50 

$3,056 26 

Balance forward 1,063 34 

$4,119 60 

Respectfully submitted, 

ST. JOHN P. KINLOCH, Treasurer. 



Department of Charities. 201 

The Committee on Improvement and Discipline respect- 
fully report that they do not see where any improvement 
ran be made in the discipline of the House. 

FRANCIS J. PELZER, Chairman. 

J. S. BUI ST, 

A. T. SMYTHE, 

A. F. C. CRAMER, 
T. A. WILBUR, 

B. A. MUCKENFUSS, 
F. Q. O'NEILL, 

I. W. HIRSCH, 
V. C. DIBBLE. 



REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON SCHOOLS, 
For the Year Ending December 31, 1908. 
Highest Number on Register. 
Boys, 124; Girls, 106. Total, 230. 

Average Attendance. 
Boys, 113; Girls, 98. Total, 211. 
Admitted During the Year. 
Boys. 11; Girls, 12. Total. 23. 
Discharged During the Year. 
Boys, 24; Girls, 18. Total, 42. 

The Studies embrace Orthography, Reading, Writing, 
Mental and Practical Arithmetic, Common School and 
Physical Georgraphy, Modern and Ancient History, Gram- 
mar, Familiar Science, Physiology. Book-keeping/ Algebra, 
Stenography, Typewriting, Vocal and Instrumental Music. 

The present system of examinations continues highly sat- 
isfactory. 

The Kindergarten now numbers sixty -two, a class of four- 
teen having been promoted to the Primary Department; this 



202 Mayor Smyth's Ann mil Review. 

departmenl is one of the besl features of the School. Another 
year's observation of the progress made in the school, con- 
vinces your Committee of its usefulness, and the ultimate 
results that will obtain no1 only to the individual pupil, but 
to the community at large in which they will make their 
homes. Education in this day and generation is essential 
to success in any of the departments of life, and the ell'ort of 
this School is to lay the foundations so secure thai in the fu- 
ture they may be built upon and relied honor and credit 
upon those conducting them. In this we are making great 
success, as evidenced by the records of the past, the present 
conditions and the bright prospects of the future. 

The Wednesday afternoon exercises for the Public still 
continue; citizens as well as strangers avail themselves of 
the opportunity to visit the Institution and, study its meth- 
ods. Educators have taken advantage of this privilege, and 
in many cases, have engrafted upon their own Institutions 
the excellent system which has given this House such an 
enviable reputation among her sister Orphan Homes. The 
one hundred and thirteenth Anniversary of the founding of 
the Institution was celebrated on the afternoon of the twen- 
ty-second of October, in the Assembly Hall. A representa- 
tive and typical audience of Charleston citizens were present 
to sIioav their deep interest in all that appertains to its wel- 
fare. The Vice Chairman of the Board presided in the 
absence of the Chairman, Mr. Francis J. Pelzer; the exer- 
cises were opened by a prayer, offered by the Rev. John 
Kershaw, D. D., after which the Vice Chairman delivered an 
address, reviewing in a measure the last year's history, 
mentioning especially the loss to us all , in the deaths of 
Messrs. George W. Williams and George W. Egan, both of 
whom were conspicuous for their fidelity to the Institution, 
and for their love and interest in it. 

The varied programme, both physical and literary, came 
up to the standard, and elicited the praise due. The address 
of Master Alva Grooms was particularly well delivered, and 
the future promises well for him ; he was the winner of the 
"Bennett Medal" for proficiency in lessons and correct de- 
portment; in delivering the Medal, the Chairman of your 



Department of Charities. 203 

Committee made a few remarks upon the strength and puri- 
ty of character of those who would attain distinction in life. 

Commissioner Williams distributed the premiums in the 
various classes, making the most happy remarks in so doing, 
and offering a prize to the boy and girl who were most faith- 
ful and industrious during the coming year. 

The evening entertainment on December 16 was largely 
attended; the Board of Commissioners as well as many of 
the City Officers were present. Among the honored guests 
were the retiring Mayor — the Hon. J. Adger Smyth — and 
the newly elected Mayor — the Hon. R. Goodwyn Rhett. 

It is needless to say that the School maintained its repu- 
tation ,as evidenced by the encomiums of those present. 

In conclusion, your Committee thank the whole Board for 
the universal interest taken in the School, and ask their co- 
operation for the future. 

J. S. BUIST, Chairman, 
VIRGIL 0. DIBBLE, 
GEO. W. WILLIAMS, 

A. T. SMYTHE, 

B. A. MUCKENFUSS. 



-04 Mayor Smyth's Annual Reuietv. 

THE COMMITTEE ON RETRENCHMENT AND 

REFORM. 

The Committee on Retrenchinenl and Reform beg leave to 
rc-porl thai the management of (he Institution is, as usual, 
conducted on as economical principles as possible, and have 
no suggesl ions to make 

Resped fully. 

F. Q. O'NEILL, Chairman. 
T. A. WILBUR, 
A. P. C. CRAMER, 
ROBT. C. LEBBY. 



BINDING OCT COMMITTEE. 

Charleston Orphan House, Jan. 1, 11)01. 

The Binding Out Committee report that during the yeai 
1903 there were admitted to the Orphan House 1G Boys and 
11 Girls; total '11. There were discharged 24 Boys and 17 
Girls; total 41. 

The majority of those discharged were given to relatives 
and are being cared for by them. One was adopted, tw<» 
v, ent to farmers, two w: ut to the V . S. Navy as apprentices, 
one is learning the printing business, one found employment 
in mercantile pursuits, one is engaged in Railroad work, 
three are in domestic service. 

Many pleasant and gratifying reports of those who have 
left the Orphan House have been received during the year. 

VIRGIL C. DIBBLE, 
I. W. HIRSCH, 
A. T. SMYTHE, 
ROBT. C. LEBBY, 
Binding Out Committee. 



Department of Charities. 205 

COMMITTEE ON REPAIRS. 

The Committee on Repairs beg to report that during the 
year eight dormitories and the Hospital were whitewashed, 
and the plastering repaired. All the entries were white- 
washed, also the ceilings in the Tablet Hall and Principal 
Sehool Room. Four rooms painted, including the Children's 
Dining Room. One Stairway painted. Three small rooms 
and the Play Rooms whitewashed. Kitchen whitewashed 
and painted. 

Wall around the premises, color-washed. 

Ceiling of the Chapel, whitewashed, the exterior, color 
washed, except the front, which was painted. 

Furnace of Boiler, re-lined. 

Wood work throughout the house, repaired. 

Forty-three window glasses and 01 window cords put in. 

One hundred and eighty-five iron bedsteadis, repaired. 

There were besides many minor repairs that can not be 
particularized. 

Cost of repairs, $859.05. 

A. F. C. CRAMER, Chairman, 
I. W. HXRSCH, 
SAMUEL G. STONEY. 



206 Mayor Smyth's Annual Review. 



COMMITTEE on PURVEYANCE. 

The Committee on Purveyance beg leave to submil their 
Repori of the Expenditures of the Charleston Orphan House 
for i he year 1903 : 

Lbs. Cost. 

Fresh Meat 23,507 $1.097 33 

Bacon, Ham and other Salt Meals.. 4,189% 470 00 

Coffee 282 20 74 

Cocoa Shells 1,144 34 32 

Rice 3.030 125 53 

Butter 1,215 283 11 

Cottolene. 095 70 14 

Tea 93 45 50 

Sugar.. . .' 2.903 139 90 

Molasses gals. 500 173 00 

Flour bbls. 19 97 10 

Irish Potatoes bbls. 24 59 00 

Sweet Potatos bbls. 35 41 00 

Bread lbs. 54,178 1,280 74 

Milk gals. 4,110% 788 98 

Grist, 323 bushels; Meal bus. 177% 350 95 

Small Groceries 319 05— $5,416 31 

Soap, Starch, etc 85 59 

Corn, 30% bushels 23 29 

Fuel— Wood, Coal and Gas 1,30195 

Illuminating Gas 274 95 

Clothing, House Linen, Hats and Shoees 2,099 70 

Books, Stationery, etc 129 71 

Medicines, Disinfectants, etc 237 30 

House Furnishings, Garden Seeds, etc 472 50 

Salaries and Labor 0,820 70 

Incidental expenses, such as Vegetables, extras for Sick, 

Officers' Tables and other items too numerous to mention. . 1,302 90 
Repairs 859 05 

$19 024 13 

^Notwithstanding the payment of $1,200 for Insurance, 
and the very much higher prices of most of the articles of 
consumption, your Committee is glad to note that there is 
left to our credit over f 400 of the Annual Appropriation. 



Department of Charities. 207 

The garden furnished the following : 

78 bunches Beets. 
563 bunches Carrots. 
375 bunches Radishes. 
280 bunches Turnips. 
42 bushels Snap Beans. 
20 bushels Tomatoes. 
1% bushels Okra. 
2% bushels Green Peas. 
175 Pumpkins. 
S92 Egg Plants. 
(»76 Cucumbers. 
144 Ears Corn. 
07 Musk Melons. 
2% barrels Onions, 

T. A. WILBUR, Chairman. 
SAMUEL G. STONEY, 
A. F. C. CRAMER. 



-'"^ Mayor Smyth's Annual Reuicw. 

COMMITTEE ON CHAPEL AM) ANNIVERSARY. 

The ( tommil tee on ( <hapel and Anniversary respeci fully re- 
I orl thai the Sabbath afternoon services have had no inter 
niption during the year; on two occasions, owing to the in 
cleinency of the weather they were held in the School Room. 
The services were conducted by I he resident ( Clergy and seven 
visiting Ministers: Revs. G. I*. Watson, G. VV. Walker, I). 
!.)., B. I*. Robertson, C. L. Weltner, YV. M. McPheeters, I). 1)., 
W . K. Callender and .J. A. Morehead, D. 1). 

On May 17, *•< Miildrn's Day," the service was very attrac- 
tive and impressive. The singing and recitations were excel 
lent. "Jesus Love Me," by L2 little children; "Building the 
Ladder," by 9 boys, and "Then Ten Commandments," by 20 
giris, were particularly beautiful features, and the congrega- 
tion, which could scarcely find standing room, went away, 
no1 only (blighted, but edified. 

The thanks of the Committee are again tendered the Cler- 
gy for their prompt and cheerful acceptance of the invita- 
tions to officiate in the (Impel. 

Respectfully submitted, 

B. A. MUCKENFUSS, Chairman. 
J. S. BUIST, 
VIRGIL C. DIBBLE, 
F. Q. O'NEILL. 



COMMITTEE ON LIBRARY. 

The Committee on Library respectfully beg to report that 
there are now in the Library 4,M7:> bound volumes and 245 
pamphlets. 

Since the last report, there have been added to the Library 
1 14 volumes and 10 pamphlets. 

During the past year, 190:3, the children have drawn and 
read 4,253 books. 

AUGUSTINE T. SMYTHE, 
VIRGIL C. DIBBLE, 
F. Q. O'NEILL, 
T. A. WILBUR. 



Department of Charities. 209 



SEWING DEPARTMENT. 

The Report of the Sewing Department, which, in addition 
to general seamstress work, includes tailoring and dress- 
making, is as follows: 

Boys' Summer Suits (flannel) 110 

Boys' Winter Suits 37 

Pantaloons, pairs 4 

Shirtees 180 

Summer Dresses 120 

Winter Dresses 89 

Boys' and Girls' Under Garments 592 

Towels, hemmed 355 

Bed Ticks 63 

Pavilion 1 

TableCloths 6 

Pillow Cases 100 

Dresses, altered 194 

Boys' Suits, altered and repaired 410 

Stockings and Handkerchiefs, marked 924 

Most of the mending for the boys, this year, was done in 
this department. The children are instructed from half-hour 
to one and a half hours each day ; the larger part of the work 
is done by the girls. 



14 



210 Mayor Smyth's Annual Review. 

LAUNDRY. 

Only three washers have boon employed in the Laundry, 
the resl of the work being done by the girls. The year's 
washing and ironing amounts to L54,835 pieces. 

While the girls are occupied in sewing, mending and other 
work, the boys are employed in various duties, suitable to 
their age. They cu1 wood, sifi ashes, carry coal, take care 
of the poultry, and, under supervision, attend to the flowei 
gardens, and assist in the vegetable garden. During the su;-.-. 
nier vacation, they made benches for the Play Rooms, and 
assisted with sundry repairs. 



The Chairman, in transmitting the Reports of the different 
Standing Committees, avails himself of the occasion to add 
his endorsement of the same. Every department of the In- 
stitution has been managed with strict economy during the 
past year. 

The Commissioners wish to add their tribute 1 of praise to 
the Principal and Superintendent, Miss A. K. Irving, as well 
as to her corps of faithful assistants. They do all in their 
power to make the Orphan House in its various departments 
the Pride of Charleston. Miss Irving has devoted the best 
years of her life in organizing the Home, and placing the 
School on its present high and satisfactory basis. In the 
Board of Commissioners the utmost harmony nrevails. 

On the afternoon of December 28th the children were again 
entertained at Mrs. R. Goodwyn Rhett's home in Broac 
street. A very large and beautifully decorated Christmas 
Tree was in the center of the ball room, and every child re- 
ceived a present from it. At Mrs. Rhett's request the chil- 
dren sang several Christmas carols. 

After a bountiful supply of ice cream and cakes, another 
present from the grab-bags, etc., the children came home with 
happy hearts and hands full of their own treasures, and the 
presents for those who could not go. Mr. Rhett provided! a 
special car for the little ones. The occasion was one that 
will not soon be forgotten, either by the children or the Com- 
missioners and other friends present. 



Department of Charities. 211 

W. Reid Smith, aged 13 months, died July 24th of Entero 
Colitis after being with as one month. He was in poor health 
when admitted. 

The interment was in his family burying ground. 

The House is open to visitors on every Wednesday at 4 
o'clock, and all citizens and strangers should avail them- 
selves of the opportunity to see and learn the condition of 
the orphans, and the advantages offered them in this benefi- 
cent Home. 

I regret to have to announce the death daring the past 
year of Mr. George W. Williams, Chairman of the Board, 
and one of our most faithful and valued Commissioners. A 
committee was appointed to prepare resolutions of respect 
to his memory, and the report of the committee is annexed. 
Respectfully submitted, 

F. J. PELZER, 
Chairman of the Board of Commissioners of the Charleston 
Orphan House. 

Charleston, S. C, January 1st, 1904. 



12 Mayor Smyth's Annual Review. 



IN MEMORIAM. 
GEORGE \V. WILLIAMS. 

The Board of Commissioners of the Charleston Orphan 
House meet this afternoon with sad hearts. 

They miss the familiar face of one, who for thirty-five 
years has been active in their midst, and who for nine years 
has been the Chairman of the Board. No member of this 
Board exceeded him in his interest in all that pertained to 
this Institution. Always active, read}- and willing to do his 
best, for the benefit of the House, always courteous and 
polite, and yet firm, in the discharge of his duties; always 
indefatigable, attentive and earnest in everything relating to 
the welfare and happiness of the orphans committed. to his 
care; always realizing and to the full measure of big ability, 
the enormous duties devolved upon him as the Chairman of 
this Board, Mr. George W. Williams was indeed a model 
Commissioner. 

No one was more attentive, no one was more active, no 
one was more loyal than he. 

A man of large business interests with many cares press- 
ing upon his attention, he was yet always ready to respond 
to the cali of the orphans, always ready to spend and be 
spent to advance the interests of this Institution. 

In his death, the Charleston Orphan House has met with 



a heavy loss and the Board of Commissioners esteem it a 
sad privilege, and yet a duty which we owe to his memory, 
to enter this minute upon the records of the Board. There- 
fore be it unanimously 

Resolved, That in the death of Mr. George W. Williams, 
the Charleston Orphan House has, in common with all the 
citizens of Charleston, sustained the loss of a man of energy, 
character, indefatigable industry and keen perception ; one 
fully alive to the interests committed to his care, and ever 
active and zealous in the discharge of the duties connected 
therewith. 



Department of Charities. 213 



Resolved, That each inmate of this House has suffered the 
loss of a personal friend, from the loved and respected Prin- 
cipal, whose duties he lightened and whose responsibilities 
he endeavored to share to the youngest child. Each one felt 
free to go to Mr. Williams if in any trouble or any difficulty, 
and ask for the advice and aid, which was so readily at their 
service. 

Resolved, That the Board of Commissioners have each lost 
a personal friend. We miss his accustomed presence. We 
see his empty chair. We mourn that we shall here look upon 
his face no more. 

Resolved, That a blank page in the Minutes be inscribed to 
the memory of Mr. George W. Williams. 

Resolved, That a copy of this preamble and these resolu- 
tions be spread upon th Minute Book of the Board ; that a 
copy be sent to the family of our late friend, and that they 
be published in the Charleston papers. 



214 Mayor Smyth's Annual Review. 

CITY ORPHAN ASYLUM. 

Charleston, S. <\, January 1, 11)01. 

To the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of Charleston : 

Gentlemen: I beg respectfully to submit hereafter a 
statement of the receipts and expenditures of the City Or 
phan Asylum for L903, also reports of various standing com- 
mittees for the fiscal year ending December 31st, L903. 

T. MOULTRIE MORDECAI, 

Chairman Board of Commissioners City Orphan Asylum. 



Statement of receipts and expenditures of Charleston Or- 
phan Asylum for the year ending December 31st, L903: 

RECEIPTS. 
To .appropriation by City Council .$0,000 00 

EXPENDITURES. 

By imouni expended as per monthly reports to City Council . ..$0,000 00 

BENJAMIN H. RUTLEDGE, 

Secretary and Treasurer. 



Department of Charities. 215 

PRESENT BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS. 

T. MOULTRIE MORDECAI, Chairman. 
JAMES F. REDDING, Vice Chairman. 
GEORGE D. BRYAN, Chairman Pro Tern, 
BENJAMIN H. RUTLEDGE, Secretary and Treasurer. 

ANDREW J. RILEY. 

GEORGE S. LEG ARE. 

CHARLES LITSCHGI. 

PRESENT OFFICERS. 

JOANNA QUINLAN, Principal Matron, 

DR. EDWARD RUTLEDGE, Physician of the Institution. 

STANDING COMMITTEES. 

COMMITTEE ON IMPROVEMENT AND DISCIPLINE. 

T. Moultrie Mordeeai, Ex-officio. A- J. Riley. 
George S. Legare. 

COMMITTEE ON SCHOOLS. 

George D. Bryan, Chairman, George S. Legare. 
Benjamin H. Rutledge. 

COMMITTEE ON RETRENCHMENT AND REFORM. 

T. Moultrie Mordeeai, Chairman. Charles Litschgi. 
George D. Bryan. 

COMMITTEE ON REPAIRS. 

Andrew J. Riley, Chairman. James F. Redding. 
Benjamin H. Rutledge. 

COMMITTEE ON PURVEYANCE- 

Charles Litschgi, Chairman, T. Moultrie Mordeeai. 
Benjamin H. Rutledge. 



_1»> Mayor Smyth's Annual Review, 

COMMITTEE <>.\ ACCOUNTS. 

Charles Litschgi, Chairman. T. Moultrie Mordecai. 
George I). Bryan. 

BINDING OUT COMMITTEE. 

T Moultrie Mordecai, Chairman. George 8. Legare. 
George I >. Br van. 

COMMITTEE ON LIBRARY. 

George I). Bryan. Chairman. George S. Legare. 
Benjamin EL Rutledge. 



Department of Charities. 217 

The Committee on Improvement and Discipline respectful- 
ly reports that the discipline of the City Orphan Asylum has 
been kept well in hand, and they have no suggestions to 
make in connection therewith- 

GEORGE D. BRYAN, Chairman. 



Report of Committee on Schools year ending December 

31st, 1903 : 

HIGHEST NUMBER ON REGISTER. 

Boys 51 

Girls 61 

Total 112 

AVERAGE ATTENDANCE. 

Boys 51 

Girls. -61 

Total 112 

ADMITTED DURING THE YEAR. 

Boys 9 

Girls 12 

Total 21 

DISCHARGED DURING THE YEAR. 

Boys 16 

Girls .. 10 

Total 26 

STUDIES EMBRACED DURING THE YEAR. 

Reading, Writing, Geography, Modern and Ancient His- 
tory, Grammar, Familiar Science, Physiology, Bookkeeping, 
Algebra, Vocal and Instrumental Music. 

The method of examinations is entirely satisfactory. 

This Institution is open twice in every week, Thursdays 
and Sundays, for parents and friends to visit the children, 
and is also open on those days to the general public. 

The anniversary exercises of the Institution were held on 



218 Mayor Smyth's Annual Review. 

Hie 22nd day of December, L903. It was the good fortune ol 
Hie children to have present on that occasion His Honor the 
A]. i voi-, lion. R. Goodwyn Rhett, who addressed them and 
dist ributed the prizes. 

The .Mayor made a formal inspection of the premises and 
expressed himself as well pleased with the management, or- 
der and discipline of 1 ho Asylum as displayed to him on Ihis 
lus official visil. 

There was a varied programme of exercises which showed 
the proficiency of the children and their general excellent 
condition both intellectually and physically. 

The addresses of the children, the various exercises per- 
formed by them and their proficiency in music and singing 
evidenced the care, skill and attention which has been 
given them by the principal matron and her assistants. 

This Committee desires to testify to the devotion of the 
teachers and the interest which they have taken in advanc- 
ing the welfare of the children entrusted to their care. 

GEORGE D. BRYAN, Chairman. 



COMMITTEE ON RETRENCHMENT AND REFORM. 

The Committee on Retrenchment and Reform beg leave to 
report that the management of the Institution is conducted 
as economically as possible, and they have no special sug- 
gestions to make on the subject. 



Department of Charities. 219 

THE BINDING OUT COMMITTEE- 

The Binding Out Committee of the City Orphan Asylum 
beg leave to report that during the year 1903 they have not 
bound out any of the children. Several of the children have 
been withdrawn by their parents and relatives who have 
been able to properly take care, support and look after the 
children, but we have not deemed it expedient, although 
several applications have been made to us, to bind out any of 
the children, as we find that those who were of sufficient age 
to go out of the Institution could be best taken care of by 
their relatives and we have preferred to adopt this course 
w herever practicable. 

T. MOULTRIE MORDECAI, Chairman, 



COMMITTEE ON REPAIRS. 

The Committee on Repairs beg leave to report that during 
the year they have repaint e d the main portion of the build- 
ing, laid down new matting in several of the rooms and gen- 
erally renovated such portions of the building as required 
such attention, the total amount expended altogether not 
exceeding three hundred dollars. This sum of three hun- 
dred dollars would ordinarily have been used in fuel consu- 
mation except for the fact that in the year 1902 the Chair- 
man of the Board had changed from the use of coal to 
wood and had been enabled to purchase at a comparatively 
low price a very large quantity of oak and pine wood which 
proved to be sufficient to carry us not only through 1903 but 
a portion of the present year. In this way we were enabled 
to make the repairs above referred to. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 

T. M. MORDECAI, Chairman. 



220 Mayor Smyth's Annual Review. 

COMMITTEE ON PURVEYANCE. 

The Commit tee on Purveyance beg leave to say that dur- 
ing the pasl year, by the exercise 1 of the greatest care and 
economy, they succeeded in keeping their supplies about 
within the appropriation. Bids were called for and Ilie 
lowest accepted on all the various articles required in 11k 1 
Institution. This committee found thai by consolidating 
bids for general groceries they were able to secure better 
prices than by advertising separately for each article. In a 
series of competitive bids — outside of fresh meats and bread 
— on all the articles used in the Institution the difference 
between the lowest and next lowest bidder was less than 
$1.40; between the next bidder, $1.10, showing that the bids 
were very close and that the plan pursued by them was 
wisest, and the most economical. 

Our meats have ben furnished also on competitive bids 
and in this way obtained at a very low price, as low as am 
Institution in the city; and so likewise in reference to the 
bread. 

The Board of Commissioners is to be congratulated that in 
\iew of the advance 1 in prices of all articles of food con 
sumption and the increased number of children, during (he 
past year, we have been able to run the Institution within 
the limits of the appropriation, or nearly so- 

CHARLES LITSCHGI, Chairman- 



COMMITTEE ON LIBRARY. 

The Committee on Library respectfully beg to report that 
there are now in the Library 200 bound volumes. 

During the year 1903 the children have taken out and 
read 100 books. 

GEORGE P. BRYAN, Chairman. 



Department of Charities. 221 

SEWING DEPARTMENT. 

< 

The report of the Sewing Department, which in addition 
to general seamstress work includes tailoring and dress mak- 
ing, is as follows: 

Boys' Summer Suits, bought ready made 51 

Boys' Winter Suits, bought ready made (being most 

economical) 51 

Girls' summer dresses 108 

Girls' winter dresses 74 

Boys' undergarments 105 

Girls' undergarments 200 

Towels hemmed dozen 

Bedticks 11 

Table cloths — 

Pillow cases 4 dozen. 

Dresses altered 30 

Boys' suits altered and repaired 40 

Stockings and handkerchiefs marked lOdoz. each. 

All mending both for the boys and girls was also done in 
this department. The children are instructed every day for 
a sufficient length of time and a large portion of the work 
is done by the girls. 

LAUNDRY. 

Only two washers are employed in the Laundry, all the 
lighter work being done by the larger girls. The year's 
washing and ironing amounted to 4,000 pieces. 

The girls sew, mend and do other proper work and the boys 
are employed in various duties suitable to their age. 

It is proper to state that in this Institution the boys and 
girls are kept absolutely separate and apart. They hold no 
communication whatever with each other and the Assistant 
Matrons and Teachers in charge of the Departments care- 
fully observe the rule that the boys and girls are not brought 
into contact. 

The asylum is so situated and arranged that this can be 
readily done without any inconvenience or additional ex- 
pense. 



222 Mayor Smyth'' s Animal Review. 

GENERAL HEALTH OF THE 1 XSTITl Tlo.X. 

The Hoard wishes to express their grateful thanks thai 
during the past year, while Hie Institution lias been visited 
by dyptheria and scarlet fever, there have been no fatal cases 
and no spread of (lie disease. 

1 pon (he election of Dr. Edward Rutledge as physician 
( i' (he Institution Ik 1 took immediate steps to establish in one 
<>!' the upper doors of (lie building an infirmary under the 
special care and direction of one of the Assistanl Matrons 5 
one room for boys and one for girls, with every modern ap- 
pliance. These rooms are properly ventilated and every 
precaution is taken against Hie spread of disease- 

When scarlel fever broke out upon us and then diphlheria 
we wore able lo isolate the cases and the result was that (he 
disease was eliminated before it was able (o spread. 

The Board desires to express their deepest appreciation of 
the services rendered by Dr. Rutledge and (he interest 
shown by him in the health and well being of the children 
and inmates of the institution. 

One of the larger girls became a victim of appendicitis, 
was promptly operated on be Dr. Rutledge, and has now. 
we are glad to say, returned to the Institution and is ap- 
1 \rently as well as she ever was. 

On the evening of December 29th, 1903, the children of the 
Institution were entertained by Mrs. R. Goodwyn Rhett, at 
the .Mayor's private residence on Broad Street, at a Christ- 
mas gathering, each child receiving a Christmas present, 
and this thoughtful kindness on the part of Mrs. Rhett was 
the source of great joy and happiness to all of our inmates, 
and this Board also highly appreciate her thoughtful con- 
sideration. 

The Board of Commissioners, in closing this their annual 
report, desire to testify their appreciation of the services 
rendered by all of the subordinate officers and of the good 
order and discipline observed by the children. 

It is a pleasure to them to be able to say that this Insti- 
tution has always been in a condition where it could be vis- 
ited at any hour of the day or night and the same order and 



Department of Charities. 



223 



discipline found to be enforced as when the Board formally 
convenes for the purpose of meeting and inspection. 

The discipline observed is as perfect as possible in an In- 
stitution of this character, and the Commissioners keep 
strict supervision over the Institution. 

Every article of food is carefully inspected before it is al- 
lowed to be used and the same food which the children re- 
ceive is also consumed by the Principal, Matron and the 
other officials of the Institution. The various members of 
the Board on their regular daily rounds make it a practice 
to taste and test these foods and have always found them 
pure and wholesome, and have no complaint whatsoever to 
make as to their character and material or the manner in 
which they are prepared and served to the children. 

Great care has been taken by the Principal Matron In 
seeing that the health of the children is preserved by having 
an increased number of lavatories and bath tubs put into the 
Institution, enforcing a rigid use of them and keeping the 
children uniformly cleanly and well clad and it is our pride 
that our children will compare favorably with those of any 
Institution in looks, bearing and mental attainment — a re- 
sult due almost entirely to the care, skill and attention of 
the Principal Matron and her assistants. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 

T. MOULTRIE MORDECAI, 

Chairman Board Commissioners City Orphan Asylum. 

Note. — Since the preparing of this report, and before it 
has been placed in the hands of the printer, it has been the 
misfortune of this Board to be deprived by death of the ser- 
vices of our lamented Vice-Chairman, Capt. James F. Red- 
ding. We annex to this report for the purpose of being in- 
corporated with it a copy of preamble and resolutions adopt- 
ed by this Board in connection with the death of Capt. Red- 
ding on March 25th, 1904. 

T. MOULTRIE MORDECAI, Chairman. 



22 I Mayor Smyth's Annual Review. 



IN MEMORIAM, 

JAMES F. REDDING. 

A1 the meeting of the Board of Commissioners of City 
Orphan Asylum, held this day, the following preamble and 
resolutions were unaimously adopted: 

Whereas, It has pleased Almighty God in His infinite 
mercy to remove from His sphere of usefulness our lamented 
Vice Chairman, James F. Redding". 

Be it Resolved, That this Hoard desires to express its 
heartfelt sorrow at the severe loss which has been inflicted 
not only upon ourselves as a Board, and the children under 
our care and our assistants and teachers, but the entire com- 
munity of this city. 

Captain Redding was a devoted member of this Board, giv- 
ing daily his time, care and attention to the children of the 
Asylum, ever thoughtful of everything which would conduce 
to their comfort and happiness. Himself the father of a 
happy family, nothing delighted him more than the oppor- 
tunity of being present with our children, and joining in 
everything which tended to amuse and instruct them. 

Second Resolved, That a blank page in our Minute Book 
be inscribed to his memory, and that a copy of these Resolu- 
tions be published in The Charleston News and Courier, and 
Evening Post, and a copy forwarded to the family. 
Extract from the Minutes of March 25, 1904. 

BENJAMIN H. RUTLEDGE, Secretary. 



Department of Chanties. 225 



SHIRRAS DISPENSARY 



Charleston, S. C., December 31, 1903. 

To the Board of Trustees of the Shirras Dispensary : 

Gentlemen — I respectfully submit this my Annual Report 
of the working and management of the Shirras Dispensary 
for the past year. 

The dispensary has been open every week clay in the year 
for the treatment of patients. The building has been kept 
clean and in order. The janitor James McCants has been 
faithful in his work, and his services have been satisfactory. 
There have been no additions made in medical or surgical 
appliances, nor improvements in the building. There have 
been necessary some repairs of a minor character to the 
woodwork and plumbing. 

I beg especially to call the attention of your Board to the 
marked increase of patients in all the departments over all 
previous years. The medical staff have been regular in 
their attendance. I beg to thank your Board for the medi- 
cal staff for the marked courtesy which they have received 
from you at all times. 

Respectfully submitted, 

CHAS. M. REES, M. D., 
Chairman Medical Staff, Shirras Dispensary. 



15 



226 Mayor Smyth's Animal Review. 

Charleston, S. C, January 1st, L904. 

To the Board of Trustees of the Shirras Dispensary: 

Gentlemen — We beg leave to handyou the Annual Report 
of the Eye Department of the Dispensary for the year 
ending December 31st, 1903 and respectfully call your 
attention to the increase of attendance over the year L902. 

Number of patients treated in 1903 548 

Number of patients treated in 1902 *• • • • 473 

Number of whites treated in 1903 33 

Number of co'ored treated in 1903 . 515 

Number of males treated in 1903 19G 

Number of females treated in 1903 352 

Number of visitits paid in 1908 1,918 

CLASSIFICATION OF DISEASES: 

AFFECTIONS OF THE CONJUNCTIVA. 

1. Conjunctivitis, acute catarrhal 68 

2. Conjunctivitis, chronic 16 

3. Conjunctivitis ollicular .. . .. 1 

4. Conjunctivitis, purulent 11 

5. Conjunctivitis, gonorrheal 1 

6 Edema of Conjunctiva 1 

7. Growth of caruncle. 1 

8. Pterygium 11 

9. Subconjunctival hemorrhage 3 

10. Symblepharon 1 

114 

AFFECTIONS OF THE CONJUNCTIVA AND CORNEA. 

1. Phlyctenular Ophthalmia 41 

AFFECTIONS OF THE CORNEA. 

1. Burn of Cornea 1 

2. Foreign bodies in Cornea 4 

3. Keratitis interstitial 7 

4. Keratitis, ulcerous . .... 19 

5. Keratitis, traumatic ........ 1 

6. Macula of Cornea 3 

7 Nebulous Cornea 5 

8. Wounds of Cornea (punctured and larcerated). .... .... 2 



Department of Charities. 227 

AFFECTIONS OF THE OOKNEA AND IRIS. 

1 . Leucoma, adherent 16 

AFFECTIONS OF THE UVEAL TRACT. 

1. Choroiditis 3 

2. Gumma of iris 3 

3. Irido eyclitis 4 

4. Iritis, acute plastic 59 

5. Iritis, chronic 4 

6. Iritis, traumatic 1 

7. Occlusion of pupils 7 

8. Mydriasis (atropia) 3 

9. Sympathetic ophthalmia 1 

10. Uveitis 3 

88 

AFFECTIONS OF THE SCLERA. 

1. Episcleritis 6 

2. Staphyloma, anterior 1 

7 

AFFECTIONS OF THE OPTIC NERVE AND RETINA. 

1. Atrophy of the optic nerve 17 

2. Hemeralopia 3 

3. Optic-neuritis 13 

4. Retinitis Albuminuric 2 

5. Retinitis, central 1 

6. Neuro-retinitis . 2 

7. Retinal hemorrhage , 2 

8. Muscae volitantes 1 

41 

AFFECTIONS OF THE CRYSTALLINE LENS. 

1. Cataract, disclocated 1 

2. Cataract, senile and incipient 7 

3. Cataract, senile and mature 14 

4. Cataract, traumatic 3 

25 

AMBLYOPIA. 

1. From prolonged lactation 1 

2. Tobacco 3 

4 



.).) 



8 Mayor Smyth's An mud Review. 



ERRORS <>F REFRACTION 

1. Astigmatsira, uyperopic 2 

2. Hyperopia 21 

;*. Myopia 3 

26 

ANOMALIES OF ACCOMMODATION. 

1. Presbyopia 7 

AFFECTIONS OF THE MUSCLES AND NERVES. 

1. Convergent squint 3 

2. ( >cular Neuralgia 7 

3. Paresis of the right external rectus muscle 1 

11 

AFFECTIONS OF THE LACRIMAL APPARATUS. 

1 . Abscess of the laorymal 1 

2. Dacryocystitis . . 1 

2 

AFFECTIONS OF THE LIDS. 

1. Abscess of the lids ,. 6 

2. Blepharitis, marginal 13 

3. Chalazion 21 

4 Ectropion .... 2 

5. Edema of lid 4 

6. Hordeolum 2 

7. Paresis of lids 1 

S. Ulcer of lid 2 

51 

Very respectfully submitted, 

CHARLES W. KOLLOCK, M. D., 
JOHN L. DAWSON, M. D., 

Ophthalmic Surgeons. 



Department of Charities. 229 

Annua] Statement of the Diseases Treated and the number 
of cases seen and the visits paid to the Shirras Dispensary, 
in the Department of Diseases of Women for the year 
ending December 31st, 1903. 

To the Board of Trustees of the Shirras Dispensary : 



NAME OF DISEASE. NO. OF OASES. 

Abscess Broad Ligament 1 

Early Pregnancy 4 

Fibroma uterus and cyst vulvo, vaginal gland 1 

Pyosaipinx and tumor R. labia , 1 

Tubal abcess . . 2 

Papiloma Vagina 1 

Complete perineal laceration 1 

Constipation 8 

Not diagnosed 11 

Leucorrboea 2 

Laceration Cervix and Perineum 9 

Laceration Cervix and Ovaritis 1 

Dysmenorrhoea 8 

Laceration cervix and perineum, prolapse R. ovary 1 

Endometritis 4 

Pruritis vulvae 1 

Dysentery 1 

Salpingo, ovaritis 2 

Salpingitis 4 

Urethral caruncle 2 

Cystitis 3 

Tumor right ovary 1 

Syphilis 1 

Fistula in ano ... 1 

Fibroma uterus 2 

Nephritis 1 

Retro, displacement of the uterus 2 

Debility 1 

Metrorrhagia 1 

Cyst left ovary 5 

Amenorrhoea 2 

Dyspepsia 1 

Ovarian cyst and fibroma of the uterus 1 

Ulcer of the vulva .... 1 

Ovaritis 1 

Ventral hernia 1 

Pelvic abscess 1 

Menorrhagia 1 

Arterio, sclerosis 1 



30 M<ni<>r Smyth's Annual Review. 



White WOmeD treated 5 

Colored women 90 

'Total cases 95 

Number visits to Dispensary, (white) 9 

Number visits to Dispensary, (colored) 275 

Total visits 284 

Respectfully, 

CriAS. M. REES, M. 1)., 

Gynecologist. 



Department of Charities. 



231 



Report of the Department of Surgery of Shirras Dispensary 
including Dermatology and Genito-Uninary Diseases, for 
year 'ending December 31st, 1903. 





Whites 


Colored 




H 

30 
1 

16 
4 
7 

30 

13 
2 

1 
22 
8 
9 
1 
1 
1 
3 
1 
2 
3 
1 
3 
2 
2 
1 
-2 
3 
1 
3 

10 
1 
2 
2 

1 
1 
1 
1 

1 
2 
1 
1 
1 


a 


DISEASES TREATED. 


13 

-z 

< 

03 
1 


03 

Is 

B 

03 


O 


a 

CD 

O 

03 

£ 


-o 

< 

03 

29 


i 

3 

10 

1 
i 


o 

03 

"2 


pi 

03 
F-i 

03 

2 

i 

i 
i 

\i 




«H 
03 

Ph 

cc 

a 
.2 

"SI 

03 

O 


Ulcers penis 

Cancer breast 


1 


Phimosis 


o 








14 

4 

7 

2* 

8 

1 

*i 

7 
9 
1 


10 
1 


Urethritis anterior 


Urethritis posterior 












Urethritis diffuse 


2 
2 

1 


i 

l 


i 






Syphilis 




Verrucae Penis ... 

Menorrhagia 

Adenitis, cervical 


2 
5 


Adenitis, inguinal 




4 


Hydrocele ... 










7 


Ulcer leg 






Nephritis, chor. interstitial 












Tinea circinata 














Bubonicele (tubercular) 










2 

'l 
3 


i 
l 

2 
o 

i 

i 
3 


i 
1 

i 


1 


Neuralgia, facialis 

Eczema, impitgeneux 












Stricture urethrae 






Appendicitis, chronic 












Eczema 






Specific vaginitis 














Balanitis 










2 




Lipoma, jaw 












Contusions 


2 


l 






1 
1 




Infected wounds 








Displacements uteri 




























Eneurisis 










1 












2 


i 

l 

i 
'i 


'1 




Influenza 












Migraine 














Peri-utberal abscess 










1 


1 


Gumma Cerbri ... 












Constipation 










1 




Epithelioma nose 










Bronchitis 














Aene vulgaris. 












1 

i 
1 


.... 


Pharyngitis 















Manor Smyth's Annual Review. 



Surgical Department of Shirras Dispensary — Continued. 





Whites 


Colored 


3 

Ch 

1 
1 
1 
1 

6 

o 

1 
1 

2 
2 

•3 



8 

1 



2 
264 


o> 


DISEASES TREATED 


a 


B 


a 

03 

■a 


o 

1 


< 


<j 
a 

s 

c 

'- 

1 
1 
1 

'l 

2 

1 
1 
2 
2 
2 

1 


V 


~: 

Id 
_ 

c: 

e 

o 

2 

1 
i 

'l 

10 


o 

to 

a 
o 
'-5 

ecs 

(h 




















I leers labia . 










"i 

3 






















rr 


Lacerations perenii 




















































infra orbital neuralgia 








• •! 


"l 




Neuritis. . 




Abscess breast 












Chancroid groin . . . 










l 
l 




Double inguinal hernia 




Measles 












Elephantiasis leg 

Adenoma sebbaccuni 




1 






"i 

i 

4 

1 

"i 

l 


1 

1 

1 
1 

1 
'i 


i 




Sprains 


1 










Simple ulcers 












Urticaria 

Rupture urethrae .... 

Inguinal hernia. 












Eczema marginalis 












Rheumatism. 












1 
1 












Haemorrhoids 




Urethra, cystitis 

Sarcoma breast 














l 
"i 




Whitlow 








Impetigo contagiosa 








l 






( Chloasma . . 










l 
i 
l 

i 

"i 
l 

2 
69 


7 




Litchen 














Orchitis (traumatic) .... 










l 
l 

2 




Orchitis 












Cystitis.. 












Fracture olecranon 












Morbus coxalgius. . . 






1 








Sup. auxiliary gland 








Faulty union of fracture femur 










1 




( 'ondylomata vulvae 








Undiagnosed . . . 














Total 


14 


4 


2 


l 


159 


41 



Department of Charities. 233 



White Male Adults 16 

White Female Adults 3 

White Male Children 2 

Total white patients treated 21 

Colored Male Adults 121 

Colored Female Adults 63 

Colored Male Children , .. . 7 

Colored Female Children 9 

Total number colored patients. 201 



Total treated. 



Total number consultations 896 

Total number operations performed, ...... 41 

Respectfully submitted, 

T. P. WHALEY, M. D., 

Surgeon to Sbirras Dispensary. 



23 \ 



Mayor Smyth's Annual Review 



Report of the Department of Diseases of Children for the 
Way 1903. 

To the Board of Trustees, Shirras Dispensary: — 

Gentlemen — I beg to submit my Annual Report \'nv work 
done during the year 11)0:5. 

DISEASES OF CHILDREN. 





Whites 


Colored 




DISEASES. 


CD 

'as 


Female 

Total 


CD 

13 


s 

a; 


o 


o 
p 

5 


Malaria 


1 




1 








1 


Syphilis 


1 


1 
1 
1 
2 


2 

1 
1 
4 
8 
1 
o 

5 

2 

7 
1 

2 

1 

1 

2 

2 
1 
1 


2 


Asthma 








1 


Epilepsy 











1 


Pertusses 








2 


4 


Bronchitis 








5 3 
11 

i! 


8 


Diarrhoea 










Gastritis 








»j 


Tuberculosis 






5 


Tonsilitis 








i 

3 

i 


1 

4 
1 
1 


2 


Constipation 








7 


Neuralgia 

Ringworm 








1 








2 


Teething paralysis 




1 
1 


! 


Tie tongue 










1 


Dentition 








l l 

{ 


2 


Influenza . . . 






9, 


Adenites 








1 


Ilio colitis. 











1 


1 












Total 


i 




1 


19 


25 


44 


45 



Deaths, one, Bronchitis. 

Total number of cases treated 45 

Total number of visits 152 

Respectfully submitted, 

EDWARD RUTLEDGE, M. D., 

Iu Charge. 



Department of Charities. 



235 



Charleston, S. C, January 1st, 1904. 
To the Board of Control of the Shirras Dispensary : 

Gentlemen — I have the honor to make the following 
Report of the Departments of the Throat, Nose and Ear 
at the Shirras Dispensary. 

DISEASES OF THE NOSE AND THROAT. 





White 


Colored. 




DISEASES. 


a5 


0) 

a 


r3 


a 

CD 


3 



Abscess of jaw 


1 


"i 


"4 

2 


2 
1 
1 

2 

2 
1 
3 

2 
2 
4 

2 

14 

3 

13 


1 


Adenoids 




Anosmia 

Apthus ulcer 

Epistaxis 




1 
3 
2 


Fracture of nose . . ... 








2 


Foreign body in throat 

Globus hysteria 






"i 
1 
1 


1 


Hay fever 






1 


Laryngitis, acute. . 




2 


5 


Laryngitis, chronic 







Lymphangitis 






3 


7 


Neuralgic throat 






2 


Pharyngitis, acute 

Pharyngitis, chronic 




1 

2 


6 

2 
8 


21 

7 


Pharyngitis syphilitic 




21 


Pharyngitis, atropic 




1 


1 


Ranula 






1 
1 
3 
4 
4 
10 
6 
3 
1 

"l 
15 


1 


Septal deflection 




1 


1 
5 
1 

2 

4 
5 

2 
3 
1 


3 


Rhinitis acute 




8 


Rhinitis, chronic 






5 


Rhinitis, atrophic 






6 


Rhinitis, syphilitic 


1 
1 


1 
1 


16 


Tonsilitis, acute. . . '. 


13 


Tonsilitis, chronic 


5 


Tonsilitis, hypertrophic 




41 


8 


Tialism 




1 


Teething 






1 


Transferred 






5 


20 


Traumatism of nose 




1 


1 


Ulcer of star nasi 






1 
102 


1 








1 
61 


1 






15 


181 



- , .;i 



Mayor Sin '/ill's Annual Review 



disi:asi-;s of tiif ear. 



DISEASES. 



While 


Colored 




a; 




QJ 










1 


C3 

g 

® 

ft 




g 

1" 
ft 



Cerumen imfacter 


2 


2 

1 


3 

3 
4 

.... 

l 
8 

4 
3 

... 


4 

11 
o 

5 

1 

*2 

7 
8 
1 
2 
3 
3 
G 
1 


9 
16 
6 
5 
2 


Deafness ... 


Furuncle of car 




Foreign body in ear 


Eczema of ear .... 


Meniers Disease 


1 
3 
15 
10 
6 
ft 


Mastard disease 






M vringitis 




Otitis acute 






( Uitis chronic 


1 


1 


Otitis syphilitic 


Polypus in ear 


4 
3 


Punctured drum 




Tinitus. aurium 




1 


5 


12 


Ulcer of extr. auditory canal 




1 




3 




34 




Total 


5 


56 


98 





Total number of patients- 
Diseases of the throat and nose. 
Diseases of the ear 



181 

98 

279 
Total number visits aud examinations made 282 

Total number of patients examined and prescribed for 561 

Respectfully submitted, 

W. PEYRE PORCHER, M. D., 

Surgeon in Charge Nose, Throat and Ear Department 
Shirras Dispensary. 



Department of Charities. 237 

Alexander W. Marshall, Secretary and Treasurer in 
Account with Shirras Dispensary. 

1903. Dit. 

Jan. 1 To balance on hand f 268 58 

Jan. 3 Mrs. H. E. Thames to Dec. 1 35 00 

Jan. 3 Mrs. H. E Thames on account 15 00 

Jan. 3 January coupons on $21 500 00 City of 

Charleston 4's 430 00 

Feb. 18 Mrs. H. E. Thames on account 35 00 

M'r'h 18 Mrs. H. E. Thames on account 35 00 

April 2 Mrs. EL E. Thames on account 40 00 

May 5 Mrs. H. E. Thames on account 45 00 

June 5 Mrs. H. E. Thames on account 35 00 

July 3 July coupons on City of Charleston 4's. 430 00 

July 3 Mrs. H. E. Thames on account 35 00 

Oct. 7 Mrs. H. E. Thames to Aug. 1 40 00 

Oct. 7 Mrs. H. E. Thames on account 10 00 

Nov. 20 Mrs H. E. Thames on account 20 00 

Nov. 3 Mrs. H. E Thames on account 35 00 

Dec. 3 Mrs. H. E. Thames on account 35 00 

1903. Ce. 

Jan. 3 \iy J. McCants, Janitor, salary and wash- 
ing, etc 11 50 

Jan. 3 G. F. Hedrich, drugs, etc., Oct., Nov. 

and Dec 

Jan. 3 Water Works, 1 year in advauce 

Jan. 3 Dr. Chas M. Rees, honorarium for 1902 
Jan. 3 Dr. W. P. Porcher, honorarium for 

1902 

Jan. 3 Dr. C.W. Kollock, honorarium for 1902 
Jan. 3 Dr. J. L. Dawson, honorarium for 1902 
Jan. 3 Dr. T. P. Whaley, honorarium for 

1902 

Jan. 2 Dr. E. Rutledge, honorarium for 1902. 
Feb. 2 Janitor, salary and washing etc. ..... 

Feb. 28 W. J. Parker, gutters, Society and 

Meetirg 20 00 

Feb. . . Jno. Huchinson, repairs Society and 

Meeting 

M'c'h. 2 J. McCants, janitor to March 1st 

April 1 Dr. G. F. Hedrich, drugs, etc., Jan., 

Feb. , and March 

April 1 Janitor's salary and washing, etc 

April 1 Dr. D. P. Frierson, sundries 



49 20 


11 40 


40 00 


40 00 


40 00 


40 00 


40 00 


40 00 


12 00 



6 50 


12 00 


98 82 


12 00 


2 90 



238 Mayor Smyth's Annual Review. 



Kerrison ( !o towels 

A. .1 . Rilej , repairing cocks 

W. B. Patillo, 200 cards 

Win Johnson & Co. \ ton coal 

Janitor's .-alary, washing, etc. to date. . 

Bills for new door at office 

Jno. MacMillan opening doors 

Janitor's salary and washing etc. to-date 
A. J. Riley, plumbing at house and 

office 

Gas ( 'oinpany in full 

Jno. MacMillian, repairing locks, etc. . 
G. F. Hedrich, drugs, etc.. April, May 

and June 

Janitor's salary, washing, etc 

I'd R M. Marshall & Bro. for 500 City 

4 per cent bonds @ 100£ 

Win. Peoples, cleaning cistern (office). . 
L. Robinson, repairing office door, etc. 

Janitor salary and washing etc 

Pd. Secretary and Treas. on ace't. . . . 
Secretary and Treas. in full to Dec. 

31st. .' 

Janitor, 2 mos. to Oct. 1 

W. B. Patillo, 1,000 cards 

J. MacMillian, repair'g electric bells 
G. P. Hedrich, for prescriptions, etc 
Win Edwards, repairing slate and 

tile roofs 

Janitor salary and washing etc 
J. MacMillan, repairs to keys and 

locks 2 25 

Nov. 14 J. Hutchinson, repairs to glasses, 

shutters, etc 7 50 

Dec. 1 Janitor, salary and washing etc. . . . 12 00 

Dec. 1 Kindling wood 1 00 

Balance on hand 102 69 



April 


I 


Vpril 


1 


April 


1 


April 


1 


M:.\ 


1 


Mav 


1 


May 


i 


June 


1 


June 


•ju 


1 uiic 


20 


June 


20 


July 


1 


July 


1 


July 


7 


Aug. 


5 


Aug. 


1 


Aug. 


1 


Aug. 


i.; 


Sept. 


8 


Oct. 


i 


Oct. 


1 


Oct. 


i 


Oct. 


2 


Oct. 


31 


Nov. 


1 


Nov. 


1 



3 oo 


50 


75 


3 75 


12 00 


6 75 


75 


12 00 


5 60 


5 12 


2 00 


86 95 


12 00 


502 50 


3 50 


3 00 


12 00 


45 00 


55 00 


24 00 


2 00 


1 50 


125 15 


5 00 


12 00 



$1 543 58 $1,543 58 



ALEX. W. MARSHALL, 

Secretary and Treasurer. 

ASSETS. 

$22 000 — City of Charleston, 4 per cent bonds deposited in Safety De- 
posit Vault of Exchange Bank & Trust Co., subject to the order of a 
majority of the Trustees. 

Brick Residence, N. W. Cor. Meeting and Society Streets. 

Brick office and Clinical Rooms, 72 Society St. 



Department of Charities. 239 

CITY HOSPITAL. 

Charleston, ft. C, January 1, 1904. 

To the Honorable the Mayor and Aldermen of the City 
Council of Charleston : 

Gentlemen : By reference to the accompanying tables, 
prepared by our Superintendent, you will see that the total 
.number of patients treated last year was 1,521, as against 
;J,443 in 1902; the number of days treatment in 1902 being 
28,814, and in 1903, 31,358; the cost of the latter per dav 
being .90.77 cents, and of the former .89.23 cents. At the 
close of 1902 the good assets on hand amounted to $1,249.47, 
and of 1903 to $645.42. In 1902 there was a deficiency or 
f 1,750 between the expenditures and appropriation, which 
;was carried over into the next year, at the close of which 
(the total deficiency amounts to $2,891.93. You will remem- 
ber that we asked for $26,765 at the beginning of the year, 
'"for all purposes, but you could only see your way to ap- 
propriate $24,000. In estimating our requirements for the 
the proper management of the Institution will admit, and 
respectfully ask for the following appropriations for 1904 : 
•ensuing year we have made them as low as, in our opinion, 

Deficiency 1903 $2,89193 

General purposes 19,500 00 

Training School . . 3,500 00 

Repairs and Insurance 1 .200 00 

Gas 1,200 00 

Total $28,29193 

THE RIVERSIDE INFIRMARY. 

There were 202 patients treated in the Infirmary during 
the year, being a few less than during the previous year, 
flfn order to carry out the policy of keeping this valuable 
property in first class condition, the entire interior was 
repainted, and the old wooden fence on Calhoun street was 
replaced with a new iron fence. 



240 Mo yor Smyth's Annual Review. 

The receipts from all sources have been $10,770 13 

Running expenses $9,7*12 17 

Improvements 043 00 

Total $10,355 17 

\.M profits for the year 414 96 

The [nfirmary has a full corps of Nurses under the ell'i 
cient superintendence of .Miss L. B. McAssey, and is fully 
(equipped as a model Infirmary for I he I real men 1 of* pay 
patients, with the exception of some necessary furniture for 
the operating room. 

THE BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 

of the Hospital are in fair condition, but the roof of the main 
building and of the several wards is sadly in need of re- 
painting. Indeed all of the buildings need a new coat of 
'paint, both for preservation and appearance. 

THE TRAINING SCHOOL. 

Since the opening of the School in 1895, one hundred and 
nine applicants have been admitted upon probation, forty - 
two of whom have graduated, the rest having been dropped 
at various times for ill health, unfitness for the work, or 
other causes. Nine of the graduates have married. 

Dr. P. Gourdin de Saussure has kindly looked after the 
[health of the pupils during the year, the Faculties of the 
Medical College and of the Medical School have given the 
school a fine course of lectures, and Miss Florence Hener; 
continues to give a practical course in invalid cookery. 

The school has been under the charge of Miss Leila V. 
Jones, Superintendent; Miss Francis May, Assistant Su- 
perintendent, and consists of the following pupils: Misses 
E. LaBruce, E. Valentine. R. S. Smith, C. D. Cummings, E. 
Harris, E. Haile, B. Alexander, B. Mendenhall, L. P. Lock- 
wood, E. R. Cook, A. L. Camp, S. E. Thomas, S. A. Coffin 
and F. C. Levack. 

The following are the graduates of the class of 1903 : 
Misses A B. Hills, F. E. Strieker, May Martin, E. P. Lining. 
M. Youmans, M. A. Matthews and B. Tucker. 



Department of Charities. 241 

We regret that we have been unable to obtain from the 
faculties of the Medical College and the Charleston Medical 
'Sohool the tables of surgical and medical cases treated by 
^nem during the period when they were respectively in 
charge, so that they could accompany and form a part of 
this report. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ZIMMERMAN DAVIS, Chairman. 



16 



2 1 2 



Mayor Smyth's Annual Review 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT FOR 5TEAR 1903. 

TABLE A. 

Showing Patients as Free, Pay, and by Race for Year 1903. 





Free 






Pay 






1 * 




T3 








QJ 




<y 


0) 


«M 






'- 














O 


cc 




O 




53 
















is 


c 
O 


s 


£ 


o 


Ph 


£ 



z 



Iii Hospital Jan. 1st, L903. 
Admitted during year 1903. 



Total Treated during Year 1903. 



8 is 
333J 774 

341 J 822 



56 

1107 

11(13 



97 



8 
202 



19 
339 



210| 358 



75 

1446 

1521 



TABLE B. 
Showing Authority for Admissions During Year 1903. 



Whites 

1st Health Ward 30 

2nd Health Ward 24 

3rd Health Ward 23 

4th Health Ward 16 

5th Health Ward 51 

6th Health Ward ... 38 



Total Health Wards 

Police Department — 

Residents of city 

Non-residents of city. ... 



182 

65 
50 



Grand 

Colored Total Total 

59 

65 
42 

87 
71 
90 

!!! 



596 



Total Police Department 115 

Faculty S. C. Medical College 12 

Faculty Medical School 9 

Emergency 8 

Jail 2 

Mayor 5 

Total Free Patients 333 

Pay Patients — 

Personal application 82 

Charleston County 2 

Berkley County 2 

British Consul 3 

German Consul 2 

Riverside Infirmary 202 

Total Pay Patients 293 

Total Free and Pay 



151 




176 




327 


442 


L3 


25 


6 


15 


u 


17 


5 


: 





5 


774 


1107 


32 

11 
3 








1(i 



339 



1446 



Department of Charities. 



243 



TABLE C. 

Showing Nativity of Patients Admitted During Year 1903. 





Free 






Pay 






T3 






r C3 




o 


o 






<X> 




-4-J 




















c 










rQ 






£ 


o 

o 


H 


£ 


6 


H 



o 



Residents of City 

Non-residents of city. 

Foreigners 

American 



Totals 



255 

78 



333 



574 
200 



829 

278 



7741107 



5 
334 



293 46! 339 



1107 

339 

1446 



TABLE D. 

Showing Number of Insane Patients Admitted, Discharged, Died and 
Sent to the Asylum, Year 1903. 



Grand 
White Colored Total Total 



On hand January 1st 1903. 
Admitted during year 1903., 



Sent to Columbia Asylum .... 3 

Discharged improved 

Died during year 1903 



3 
18 

— 21 
9 

4 
1 

— 14 



Remaining on hand Jan. 1st, 1904 7 

TABLE E. 

Showing Patients Discharged and Died during Year 1903. 





Free 


Pay 


3 






T3 






Td 






H 






a 


r- 1 


<v 


<D 


i— i 


_ 


Ti 






o 










a 


a 




r& 






£1 




t> 




& 




£ 


o 
O 


H 


& 


C 

O 


s 


o 
Eh 


£ 

o 


Discharged ... 


279 


623 


902 


80 


42 


189 


1 
311 


1213 


Died 


40 


151 


191 


9 


8 


14 


31 


222 


Totals 


319 


874 


1093 


89 


50 


203 


342 


1435 





Total Treated Free and Pay Table A 1521 

Total Discharged and Died Table E 1435 



Kemaining in City Hospital and Riverside Infirmary, Jan. 1, 1904. . 



86 



244 



Mayor Smyth? & Annual Review. 



TABLE F. 

Showing Patients remaining in City Hospital and Riverside Infirmary, 

January 1st, 1904. 



Free Patients 

Pay Patients 

Riverside Infirmary 



Total, 





TZ 








o 


^3 




£ 


CJ 


22 


48 


8 


1 


i 





37 


ID 



70 



86 



Table G. 
Showing number of days treatment and average for Year 1903. 



Number of Free Patients— Table A. 
Number of Private 4 " '* " 

Number of Kiv. Inf. " " " 



Total Number of Patients Treated, Year 1903. 

Number of Days Treatment, Free Patients 

Number " " " Private " 

Number " •' " Riv. Inf. " 



Total number of Days Treatment for Year 1903. 
Average Number of Days Treatment, Free Patients. 
Average " " '* " Private " 

Average " <l " " Riv. Inf. " 

Average Number of Patients per day, free 

Average " " " " " Private 

Average " " '• " " Riv. Inf 



Total Daily Average for Year 1903 

Highest Number in 1 Day, City Hospital 

Highest " " " Riverside Infirmary. 



Lowest Number in 1 Day, City Hospital 

Lowest " " " Riverside Infirmary. 



1,163 
148 
210 



1,521 

.25,526 

1,836— 27,362 
3,996 



S8 



31,358 
21HH 



16 


104 


52 
4 


56 



Department of Charities. 245 

TABLE G. No. 1— Continued. 

Showing Average Cost of One Day's Treatment in City Hospital for 

Year 1903. 



For Salaries and Staff Honorarium — 

City Hospital. . $ 7,824 95 

Training School I,j569 23 

Average 34.33 

For Subsistence and Milk — 

City Hospital $ 6,656 50 

Training School . . 1,105 24 

Average 28.37 

For Supplies and Sundries — 

City Hospital $ 4,838 92 

Training School 81152 

Average 20.66 

For Medicines — 

City Hospital $ 2,035 42 

Average 7 . 41| 

Total average 90 77-100 



!46 Mayor Smyth's Annual Review 



T \UI.I-: G. Continued. 

ShoAving Expenditures for City Hospital, Riverside Infirmary, [nsane 

Building, Training School and Operating Room 

Furniture for Year 1903. 



City Hospital 

Nursing and Salaries .$7,824 05 

Subsistence and Milk 6,056 50 

Supplies and Sundries 4,838 vj 

Medicines 2,035 42 

Gas 1,420 20 

Repairs 593 • >? 

Insurance 566 50 

Lunatics 214 35 

Advertising 11 00 

— $ 24,161 05 

Training Schoo.1 — 

Salaries $1,560 23 

Subsistence and Milk 1,105 24 

Supplies and Sundries 811 52 

— — $ 3,485 00 

Riverside Infirmary- 
Nursing and Salaries $2,371 03 

Subsistence and Milk 3,861 25 

Supplies and Sundries 1.614 52 

Medicines 006 24 

Improvements 643 00 

Gas and Electric Lights 435 33 

Electric Power and Repairs 148 50 

Repairs 165 45 

Elevator and Furniture Insurance 63 00 

— $ 10,300 12 

Insane Building — 

City Hospital $2,200 65 

— $ 2,200 65 
R. B. R. Operating Room Furniture — 

City Hospital $ 722 05 

$ 722 05 

Total cost of City Hospital, Riverside Infirmary 
Training School, Insane Building and Oper- 
ating Room Furniture $ 40,870 76 



Department of Charities. 247 

TABLE H. 
Showing Collections for 1903. 



City Hospital — 

Private Patients $1,314 35 

Insurance 500 00 

Charleston County 444 00 

Board of Health 350 00 

Bills Payable 300 00 

City Treasurer 255 48 

Berkeley County 197 00 

Subsistence and Sundries 104 10 

Street Department 100 00 

Sale of Horse 85 00 

British Consul 68 60 

German Consul 23 00 

$ 3,741 5S 

Riverside Infirmary — 

Private Patients $ 9,606 43 

For Medicines 43 60 

— $ 9,650 03 

Training School — 

Services Nurses on Cases $ 154 10 

Nurses Uniform Material 32 75 



186 85 



$ 13,578 41 



TABLE I. 
Showing Earnings C. H., R. I., T. S., for Year 1903. 

City Hospital — 

Private Patients $ 1,427 85 

Charleston County 354 00 

Berkeley County 155 00 

British Consul 52 60 

German Consul 23 00 

$ 2,012 45 

Riverside Infirmary — 

Private Patients $9,593 99 

Board of Nurses 1,352 41 



Training School — 

Services Nurses $ 239 02 



10,946 40 



239 02 



$ 13,197 87 



248 Mayor Smyth's Annual Heciew. 

TABLE J. 

Showing Assets December 31st, 1003. 



( it v Hospital 

Private Patients $ 127 50 

Berkeley County 130 00 

Chariest on County 17 00 

Street Departmenl 50 00 

Ambulance 2 00 

— $ 335 50 

Piversitle Infirmary— 

Private Patients $ 300 02 

$ 309 02 

$ 645 42 
TABLE K.— FINANCIAL. 



Appropriations — 

Maintenance and Salaries $18,000 00 

Repairs and Insurance 800 00 

Training School 3,500 00 

Lights 1.200 00 

Insane Building 1,700 35 

Operating Room Furniture 725 00 

Collections 13,578 41 

— $ 39.503 70 

Bills Paid by City Treasurer- 
City Hospital $21,260 12 

City Hospital Deficiency, 1902 1,220 16 

Riverside Infirmary 10,300 12 

Riverside Infirmary, left over Dec. 31st, 1002 284 01 

Training School 3,485 99 

Insane Building 2,200 65 

operating Room Furniture 722 95 

( ash left in City Treasury to credit Insane Building 4 05 

Cash left in City Treasury. Operating Room 

Furniture 2 05 

Cash left in City Treasury, City Hospital 03 

Cash left in Superintendent's hands Jan. 1st, 1904. 5 63 

$ 39,503 76 

I submit the above as my report for all departments of 
City Hospital for the year 1903. 

CHAS. L. DuBOS, Supt. C. H. 



Department of Charities. 249 



ALMS HOUSE. 

Charleston, S. C., January 13, 1904. 

To the Honorable Mayor and Aldermen of the City of Char- 
leston, S. C. : 

Gentlemen : I submit this my annual report as Master o\ 

close the annual report of the Master of the City Alms 

House for the fiscal year ending December 31, 1903, as made 

to the Commissioners, and by them ordered to be sent to 

your honorable body. 

The cost of maintenance of the institution has been 
(107.49) one hundred and seven 49-100 dollars less than the 
appropriation made. 

The amount expended for free transportation has been a 
good deal less than for several years. 

1 issued eighty-seven (87) passes at a cost of $294.43, a sav- 
ing to the city of one hundred and five (f 105.57) 57.100 dol- 
lars of the four hundred (400.00) dollars appropriated for 
this purpose. 

The inmates of the house, of which there are seventy (70), 
are receiving the best of attention, and nothing but goofl 
food and clothing are given to them. They are also well 
cared for by the Master and Matron. 

Very respectfully, 

HERMANN KLATTE, 
Chairman B. C. A. H. 



250 Mayor Smyth's Annual Review. 

REPORT OF MASTER. 

( 'ii aim kstux, S. C, January 1, L904. 

Gentlemen : I subniii this my annual report as Master of 
the Institution for the fiscal year ending December 31, L903. 

The following statement shows the number of persons ad- 
mitted, discharged, sent 1<> City Hospital and remaining in 
the House; also the out-door pensioners drawing ration* 
and the receipts and disbursements during the said year: 

ADMITTED. 

Males, 25: Females, 17; Children, 1. Total 43 

Natives Ireland 9 

Nat ives of Germany 1 

Natives of Austria 1 

Natives of Finland 1 

Natives of Pennsylvania 1 

Natives of Tennessee 1 

Natives of North Carolina 2 

\a i ives of South C Carolina 27 



Total Admitted 43 

DISCHARGED. 

Males, 25; Females. 17. Total 42 

Natives of Ireland 

Natives of Germany 

Natives of Finland 

Natives of New York 

Natives of Pennsylvania 

Natives of Tennessee 

Natives of North Carolina 2 

Natives of South Carolina 26 

Natives of Maine 1 

Total Discharged 42 



Department of Charities. 251 

TRANSFERRED TO CITY HOSPITAL. . 

Males, 7; Females, 6. Total 13 

Natives of Ireland 4 

Natives of Finland 1 

Natives of New York 1 

Natives of Pennsylvania 1 

Natives of North Carolina 1 

Natives of South Carolina 5 

Total Transferred 13 

DEATHS. 

Females, 8. Total 8 

Natives ofi Ireland 1 

Natives of Germany 1 

Natives of South Carolina 6 

Total Deaths 8 

INMATES OF THE HOUSE. 

Males, 28; Females, 39; Children, 2. Total 69 

Natives of England 

Natives of Ireland 1 

Natives of France 

Natives of Spain .. .. 

Natives of Denmark 

Natives of Germany 

Natives of Austria 

Natives of Canada 

Natives of Greece • 

Natives of North Carolina 3 

Natives of South Carolina 39 



Total Number of Inmates . . . 
Average Number of Inmates. 



OUT-DOOR PENSIONERS. 

White Males 10 

Colored Males 19— 29 

White Females 58 

Colored Females 110—168 

White Children 57 

Colored Children 65—122 

Total 319 

Who have drawn weekly 253 rations. 



252 Mayor Smyth's An mini Review. 

Of i lie appropriation by City Council, namely, $9,500.00, 
i lie board lias disbursed $9,392.51, leaving a balance of 
$107.49 unexpended. 

Prom sales of empty bags and barrels have been received 
£' IT..'!!, which has been expended through petty cash. 

Due by city for free transportation for the pasl three 
months, advanced by the Board, $85.15. 

The inmates of the House have received the best care and 
ai tention. 

Respectfully submitted, 

JULIUS <;. SUIIROUDER, Master. 



Department of Charities. 253 



WILLIAM ENSTON HOME. 

Charleston, S. C, January 7th, 1904. 
To the Honorable Mayor and Aldermen : 

Gentlemen — I beg to submit herewith the Annual Finan- 
cial Report for 1903 of the Trustees of the Wm. Enston 
Home and of the Trustees of the Wm. Enston Annuitants' 
Fund. 

Respectfully submitted, 

M. B. PAINE, 

Secretary. 



-••I Mayor Smyth's Annual Review. 



\\ M. ENSTON ANNUITANTS' FUND. 

Cash transactions of Win. A. Courtenay, .J. V. Ficken, W. E Butler, 
Trustees from January 1st, 1903 to December 31st, 1903. (Statemenl 
Number 31.) 



Receipts. 

By Balance Cash on hand December 31st, 1902 437 41) 

By January- July Int. State Stock * 1 .741 25 

By January-July int. Charleston 4 per cent Bonds :* 470 00 

>y January interest Sumter Bonds net 718 6(1 

By January-July interest on Greenwood Bonds nut. 360 00 

By January-July int. Wilmington, N. C net 838 85 

By March-September int. Union Bonds, net 1,200 00 

By April-October int. Aiken Bonds, net 779 30 

By April-October int Gaffney Bonds, net . . 199 20 

By December interest Chesterfield Bonds net 1 2u0 00 

* '0,007 20 
By Sale State Stock, $8,500 @ 114 less brok'ge $21 25 9,668 75 

$ 20,713 44 
Disbursements. 

Annuities $7,500 00 

Expenses of Administration. 77 00 

— $ 7,577 00 

Trustees Commrs. on Receipts $10,607 20 

Trustees Commrs. on Disbursements 7,577 00 

Trustees Commrs. on Disbursements 2 512 78 

$20,696 98 @, 2h "„ 517 42 

Trustees Wm. Enston Home, surplus 2,512 78 

Investment $7,500 Charleston 4 per cent bonds % 100} and 

Brok ge 7,541 25 

Investment 82,000 Wilmington, N r . C, 4 per cent bonds and 

Brok'ge @ 101 2 020 00 

Balance Cash on hand 544 99 



$ 20,713*44 



Charleston, December 31s% 1903. 

WM. A. COURTENAY 



W. E. BUTLER, 

Trustees. 



Department of Charities. 255 



WM. ENSTON ANNUITANTS FUND. 
Assets — Annuitants Fund, December 31st, 1903. 



$ 13,000 00 Aiken 6 per cent bonds, coting $ 13,000 00 

90,500 00 Chaleston 4 per cent bonds costing 69,118 76 

20,000 00 Chesterfield 6 per cent bonds, costing 22,279 04 

10,000 00 Gaffney City, 5 per cent bonds, costing 10,383 94 

6,000 00 Greenwood 6 per cent bonds, costing 6,565 65 

30,000 00 State Stock, 4£ per cent, costing 22,056 72 

12.000 00 Sumter 6 per cent bonds, costing 12,000 00 

20,000 00 Union 6 per cent bonds, costing 20,315 00 

22,000 00 Wimington, N. C, 4 per cent bonds, costing .... 22,235 90 

544 99 Cash 544 99 

$224,044 99 $ 198,500 00 



Charleston, December 31st, 1903. 



WM. A. COTTKTENAY, 
J1TO. F. FICKEN, 
W. E. BUTLER, 

Trustees. 



256 Mayor Smyth's Annual Review. 

W.M. ENSTON HOME. 
(ash Statement January 1st, 1903 to December 31st, 1903 

Receipts. 

Balance Cash on hand December 31st 1902 $17,827 29 

Interest 5 150 09 

Balan e Annuitants' Fund, Surplus 1903 1.199 70 

On Account " " " 1903 1,312 78 

Bonds matured and paid (Colleton Co., Oct.) $6,800 00 

Less exchange 50 6,793 50 



$32,283 36 
Disbursements. 

Expenses of Administration, safe, lumber for fence, smoke 

stack, etc $ 2,710 67 

Fuel and lights 345 61 

Balance, cash on hand 29,227 08 



$32,283 36 



Charleston, December 31st, 1903. 

WM. E. HUGER, 

President. 



Department of Charities. 257 



WM. ENSTON HOME 
Assets December 31&t 1903. 



7,000 00 Winnsboro Bonds, 7 per cent costing. .$ 7,035 00 

500 00 Greenville Bonds, 7 per cent costing. . . 500 00 

10,000 00 Marion Bonds, 6 per cent costing 9,750 00 

5,000 00 Charleston Bonds, 5 per cent costing . . 5,250 00 

3,500 00 Charleston Bonds, 4 per cent costing. . . 2,027 77 

10,000 00 Columbia Bonds, 4 per cent costing . . . 7,035 00 

5,000 00 State Stock, 4£ per cent costing 5,143 75 

7,343 66 Cash 7,343 66 

!?48,343 66 $44,085 18 

New Cottage Fund. 

3,000 00 Kershaw Bonds, 7 per cent costing $ 3,000 00 

1,800 00 Newberry Bonds, 7 per cent costing. . . 1,854 00 

1,000 00 Pickens Bonds, 7 per cent costing 1,060 00 

10,000 00 Charleston Bonds, 5 per cent costing. . . 10,500 00 

20,000 00 Charleston Bonds, 4 per cent costing. . . 18,063 75 

2,000 00 Columbia Bonds, 4 per cent costing. . . . 1,430 00 

21,883 42 Cash 21,883 42 

$59,683 42 $57,791 17 

1108,027 08 Total Total $101,876 35 



Charleston, December 31st, 1903. 

WM. E. HUGER, 

President. 



17 



258 Mayor Smyth's Annual Review. 



INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR COLORED ORPHANS. 

To the Honorable the City Council of Charleston: 

As there has not yet been established an Industrial School 
for colored orphans in the City of Charleston, the Commis- 
sioners, following their custom for several years past, have 
applied the appropriation which was made last year to the 
needs of the Orphan Aid Society, thinking that thus they 
carried out best the objects for which the appropriation 
was made. 

Your Commissioners regard the Orphan Aid Society as a 
very useful institution, and one which is doing excellent 
work. Its expenses are very large, and the institution de- 
pends mainly on charity for its maintenance and continu- 
ance. In the City of Charleston it maintains a large day 
school for negro and colored children, which supplies means 
of education to those who cannot get entrance into the 
public schools; and it also maintains an orphanage where 
negro orphans and waifs are brought up. The Institution 
also has at Ladson's, S. C, an industrial school and reforma- 
tory where children are made to learn how to be useful on 
a farm. 

The needs of this Institution are great, and any amount 
which the City Council should think tit to give could be 
advantageously and profitably applied to it, until provision 
is made for the establishment of an Industrial School for 
colored children. 

As in the past, we ask now for an appropriation of One 
Thousand ($1,000) Dollars. 

Very respectfully, 

FRANK R. FROST, 

Chairman. 
April 16, 1904. 



Department of Charities. 259 



OLD FOLKS HOriE. 

To his Honor Mayor Smyth and Members of City Council : 

Gentlemen — It is with much pleasure in submitting the 
Annual Report of the Ashley River Asylum that we state 
that the Institution is now in a better condition than it ever 
was. The Steward and Matron deserve commendation for 
the manner in which they have discharged their duties 
toward the inmates as well as to the Board, the attending 
physicians have given the inmates the best attention possi- 
ble, and we would respectfully refer you to the steward's 
report which gives number admitted, deaths, etc., and the 
secretary and treasurers report which gives the income and 
expenditures. 

STEWARD'S ANNUAL REPORT FOR YEAR 1903. 

Number Admitted 51 

Number Died 26 

Interments Public Grounds, colored 406 

" white 18 

Number of Inmates in Home 62 

Sent to City Hospital 17 

Average Number of Inmates for Year 59 

Interment Fees $11 20 

Very respectfully, 

R. M. MASTERS, 

Chairman Com. Ashley River Asylum. 



260 Mayor Smyth'' s Annual Review. 

Charleston, S. C, January 1st, 11)04. 

To the Board of Commissioners of Public Lands: 

Gentlemen — In compliance with rules of our Board,] 
respectively submit the following report of receipts and 
expenditures for vein- L903. 

Commissioners Public Lauds in Account with City Treasurer : 

By appropriation % 5, 500 00 

By rent of Farm 250 00 

By Interments 11 20 

$ 5.761 20 

To Salaries $ 1, 193 86 

To Provisious, Wood and Coal 3,635 86 

To Carpenter Repairs 94 85 

To Two Force Pumps 86 25 

To Balance in City Treasury 750 38 

$ 5,761 20 

Respectfully, 

H. W. H. BUCK, 

Secretary and Treasurer C. P. L. 



Education in Charleston. 261 



EDUCATION IN CHARLESTON 



ANNUAL REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT ARCHER. 

Office Superintendent of the City Public Schools, 
Charleston, December, 31, 1903. 

To the Honorable, the City Board of Public School Commis- 
sioners: 

Gentlemen : — In accordance with the rules of the Board, 
I herewith respectfully submit this, my Eighteenth Annual 
Report, and the forty-ninth in the series of reports by the 
Superintendents of Schools. 

The schools opened on Monday, the 5th of January, with 
an enrollment of 8,319 pupils, which was an increase of 274 
over the enrollment on the opening day of the year previous. 
The total enrollment for the year was 8,547. 

Of the 8,547 pupils, 4,418 were whites, and 4,129 were col- 
ored. Of the 4,418 whites, 2,162 were boys, and 2,256 were 
girls. 

Of the 4,129 colored, 1,910 were boys and 2,219 were girls. 

The average daily attendance was 93 per cent of the num- 
ber belonging. The number of pupils remaining at the close 
of the year was 7,948, 246 more than at the close of 1902. 

The number of pupils studying each of the branches in 
the curriculum was as follows : 

Alphabet 998 

Spelling " 3,846 

Reading 3,846 

Writing 2,947 

Mental Arithmetic 2,947 

Written Arithmetic 2,947 

Geography.. ¥ 2,562 

English Grammar 2,562 

History of United States 2,947 

History of South Carolina 2.375 

Physiology and Hygiene 1,728 

Drawing 5,322 

Vocal Music 1 5,322 

Calisthenics ,. 4,287 

Higher Branches , ,. 1,728 



262 Mayor Smyth's Annual Review. 



M MBER OF PERSONS EMPLOYED. 

Superintendent 1 

Principals (all males) 

Vice Principals (males) 2 

Male Teachers 2 

Female Teachers 99 

l'.\l ra Teachers IS 

Janitors (all males) 6 

Total 134 

Number of months in school session, nine and one-quarter. 

The work of the year has been mostly on lines previously 
laid down in (he coin-so of study, and our energies have been 
expended in Ihe direction of securing good results from 
faithful effort on the pari of teachers and pupils alike. I 
am convinced that Heading, Arithmetic and Language study 
are the fundamental brandies, and that there is nothing in 
any course of study that can take their place. Other branches 
may quicken, enliven and intensify interest, but Reading, 
Arithmetic and Language study are the foundations, and on 
these every successful teacher must seek to build. A teach- 
er's work is not completed when she has simply taught her 
pupils how lo read from regular text books or reading-read- 
ers as they are called — this is a mechanical process, but she 
should instill in her pupils a love for reading good books and 
ood matter, wherever found, and this can never be done by 
reading over and over the pages of the reading book. What 
is most needed in the schools is more supplementary reading, 
and I purpose moving in this direction next year. All edu- 
cators are agreed that Arithmetic is the logical branch of 
the course, and realizing this, no efforts have been spared to 
emphasize the importance of developing the reasoning facul- 
ties of the children. This obtains in all the grades, from ob- 
jective counting with the abacus in the first grade to the 
siudy of mensuration and the metric system in the highest. 
That Language study should precede the study of tech- 
nical Grammar is no longer an open question, and our pupils 
in the upper grades of the primary department are required 
to take up this study long before they enter the grammar 
grades. 



& 



Education in Charleston. 263 

For a number of years the teachers of our schools have 
given much attention to the teaching of Geography- Dur- 
ing the past year map drawing and place geography have 
been emphasized, and the children have discovered that Geog 
raphy has a peculiar, fascinating and absorbing interest. 
Oral History has been taught in the lower grades as prepar- 
atory to the use of the text book in the higher, and with 
commendable results. The weak spot in our public school 
system is Spelling, and because of this more time has been 
given during the past year to -oral exercises and to writing 
from dictation. Commendable results have attended the 
teaching of Drawing, and vocal music in all the schools, and 
I take pleasure in so reporting. Satisfactory work has also 
been done in the special departments of Latin, French, Phys 
ics, Laboratory work, Elocution, Stenography, Typewriting, 
and Calisthenics at the Memmmger Normal School. 

ANNUAL EXAMINATIONS. 

These were held in all the schools a week earlier than the 
time prescribed in the book of Rules so as to enable the 
teachers to attend the State Summer School at Rock Hill, 
which opened during the last week in June. The regular 
work of the schools was accordingly closed up a week ear- 
lier, and the annual exhibitions were held on Friday, the 
19th of June under the direction of the supervising Commis- 
sioners. 

MEMMINGER NORMAL SCHOOL, MR. TATE, PRIN- 
CIPAL. 

The commencement exercises of this school were held at 
the Academy of Music in the presence of an immense audi- 
ence. The Hon. Charles H. Simonton, the Chairman of the 
Board, presided, and presented the diplomas to the grad- 
uates, thirty in number. The first honor and the school gold 
medal were won by Miss Dorothy L. Erckmann; the Mitch- 
ell gold medal for the best original composition was won 
by Miss Nellie Marion Kiellin, and at the request of the 
donor, Commissioner Julian Mitchell, was presented by J 



264 Mayor Smyth's Annual Review. 

Fdmund Burke, Esq. The alumnae gold medal Uw the best 
exhibition of elocution was won hy Miss Louise Elizabeth 
Bouson, and was presented by .Miss Agnes C. Strohecker, 
the president of (lie association. 

The prizes of (en dollars in gold annually offered by (he 
Charleston Chapter of the Daughters of (he Confederacy for 
(he best original essay on some subject relating to the war 
for Southern Independence were won by 31 iss Louise Kent 
Follin, of the Bennett School, and Master Jonathan Lucas 
of the ('rafts School, and were 1 presented by the Daughters 
themselves- The competition for this prize is limited to (he 
members of the highest grade in the boys' and the girls' de- 
partments of 1he Bennett, Crafts and Courtenay Schools. 

BENNETT SCHOOL, MR. C. L. LEGGE, PRINCIPAL. 

Public interest centered in this school because of the pre- 
sentation of the "Bennett medals" generously donated an- 
nually by Mrs. Andrew B. Murray as incentives to effort on 
the part of the pupils in the first or highest class of the boys' 
and girls' departments. The medal for the boys was won 
by Master Hall T. McGee, Jr., the one for the girls by 
Miss Louisa K. Follin, and were presented by the Hon. 
George L. Buist, the supervising commissioner of the school. 

CRAFTS SCHOOL, MR- 11. E. SEABROOK, PRINCIPAL. 

The closing exercises of this School were presided over by 
its Supervising Commissioner, the Hon. James Simons, and 
were very interesting. Mr. Simons read the Honor Rolls of 
the three departments and congratulated the pupils and 
teachers for the good work done. 

OOURTENAY SCHOOL, MR. J. A. FINGER, PRINCIPAL. 

The exhibition of this School was very creditable. The 
Supervising Commissioner, Capt. J. H. E. Stelling, had of- 
fered three silver medals as stimulants to effort on the part of 
the pupils, and they were won by the most proficient pupil in 
the Boys', Girls' and Primary Departments. The donation of 
Commissioner Stelling was greatly appreciated. 



Education in Charleston. 265 

SHAW SCHOOL, MR. EDWARD CARROLL, PRINCIPAL. 

The closing exercises of this School were conducted by 
one of its Supervising Commissioners, A. C. Kaufman, Esq-, 
who took occasion to compliment the teachers and pupils for 
the excellent record they had made during the past year. As 
an incentive to effort in this School the Board had offered a 
free scholarship at the State Colored College at Orangeburg 
to the most proficient pupil. It was won by Christopher 
Perry. 

SIMONTON SCHOOL, MR, W. P. HILL, PRINCIPAL. 

The exhibition of this School was fully up to its usual high 
standard and reflected credit upon all who participated in it. 
The Supervising Commissioner, Theodore A. Wilbur, Esq., 
presided and read the Honor Rolls in each department. 

SUMMER SCHOOLS. 

A Summer School for the teachers of the State was held at 
Winthrop College, Rock Hill, for four weeks, under the direc- 
tion of the Hon. O. B. Martin, State Superintendent of Edu- 
cation. Some of our teachers attended, but most of them 
went to the Summer School of the South, at B^noxville, Tenn. 

A County Summer School for Charleston County was held 
at the Crafts School building for four weeks- This School 
was under the supervision of William E. Milligan, Esq., 
County Superintendent of Education, and was conducted by 
Mr. W. K. Tate, Principal of the Memminger Normal School, 
assisted by Miss Sarah Withers, of Chester. The attendance 
was not large owing to the intense heat of the weather. 

RESIGNATION OF TEACHERS. 

During the past year the following named teachers have 
resigned : Miss Maggie A. Timmons, of the Bennett School ; 
Miss Anna B. Williams, of the Bennett; Miss Lou. E. Nev- 
ille, of the Courtenay, and Miss Ephie L. Jordan, of the Mem- 
minger Normal. 



266 Mayor Smyth's Annual Review. 

TEACHERS ELECTED. 

These vacancies Lave been filled by the election of .Miss 
Maggie Jordan and .Miss Eleanor R. Loeb for the Bennetl 
School, .Miss Mary P. Frosl for the Courtenay and Miss 
Mai'v Taylor for the Memminger Normal. .Miss Edythe M. 
Pringie, .Miss L- V r . Williams, .Miss Gertrude Muncaster, Miss 
KaU' A. Branded, .Miss Mary M. Meggett, Miss Carrie M. 
Getty, .Miss Catherine Fogarty, Miss Janie Grace and .Miss 
Zoo St. Amand were elected extra teachers. 

NECROLOGY. 

During the past year there were two deaths among the 
teachers, Miss Fannie M. Kinsey, on the 20th of -Inly, and 
Miss I (1m M. Cronan, on the 23rd of December. 

Miss Kinsey graduated with distinction from the Memmin- 
ger Normal School under Miss Simonton in 1875, and such 
was tin 1 appreciation of her services as a teacher that the 
Board unanimously adopted the following as a tribute to her 
memory : 

The unexpected death of Miss Fannie M. Kinsey has de^ 
prived the schools of the services of an earnest, faithful and 
conscientious teacher, one who was in thorough sympathy 
with her work, and who did it well. Sin 1 graduated with dis- 
tinction front the Memminger Normal School in the class ot 
1875, and shortly afterwards was elected a teacher for the 
Grammar Department of the Shaw r School. This was the 
only school in which she ever taught, and though offered a 
transfer to another school she gratefully declined it, feeling, 
as she said, that it was her duty to remain where she could 
do the most good. 

Miss Kinsey possessed in a remarkable degree the two most 
important qualifications for the teacher's office — the knowl- 
edge of child nature and the capacity for training it. The 
most prominent traits in her character were decision, execu- 
tive force and a loyal obedience to constituted authority. 
She never questioned the propriety of an order, but obeyed 
it and left the responsibility where it belonged. Miss Kinsey 



Education in Charleston. 267 

was exact, painstaking and methodical in whatever she did. 
She prepared herself conscientiously for the duties of each 
day and taught with that confidence which preparation al- 
ways inspires. But her work is done, her last lesson has' been 
taught, and she has left behind her the record of a noble, 
useful and self-sacrificing life. 

Miss Cronan was graduated from the Memminger Normal 
Sthpol under Miss Simonton in the class of 1894, and soon 
after graduation was elected a teacher in the Primary De- 
partment of the Bennett School- She soon gave promise of 
becoming a good teacher, and by successive promotions rose 
to a position in the Boy's Department. It was here that her 
pewters w T ere most strikingly developed and her usefulness 
ntcst fully appreciated. She labored hard for the welfare of 
her pupils, and often taught when she was unequal to the 
effort. She died of consumption at an early age, honored 
and beloved by all who knew her. 

DONATIONS. 

Through the efforts of the Hon. William A. Courtenay, ex 
School Commissioner, the valuable oil portrait of the late 
William Crafts, wiiich has been held as a loan to the Board 
by his kinsman, Mr. William Crafts, of New York, has be- 
come their property, as will be seen from the following cor- 
respondence : 

New York, February 14, 1903. 
Eon. William A. Courtenay, Newry, S. C. : 

Dear Sir: It will give me pleasure to present to the 
"Crafts School," at Charleston, S. C, the portrait of Wil- 
liam Crafts, which is now there as a loan. 

Sincerely yours, 

WILLIAM CRAFTS 

L T pon the receipt of this note Mr. Courtenay wrote to 
Judge Simonton as follows : 



>/ lyor Smyth's Annu 

Newry, S. <\. February L6, L903. 

lion. Charles II. tiimonton, Chairman City Bowrd ScJiool 
Commissioners, Charleston, 8. G. 

Dear Sir: Jl gives me infinite pleasure i<> enclose a note 
from the namesake of the late Hon. William Crafts, in which 
he donates to the Commissioners, for the "Crafts School," 
the original portrait of his uncle, which has been a! the 
school as a loan for several years past. Congratulating the 
Commissioners on this most desirable acquisition, I remain. 

Your obedient servant, 

WILLIAM A. COURTENAY. 

The portrait was accepted by tin 1 Board with thanks, and 
their Secretary was directed to make suitable acknowledge- 
mi nt to Mr. Crafts and to the Hon. William A. Courtenay. 

PORTRAIT OF MR. MEMMINGER. 

Through the efforts of your Superintendent, the Board has 
also become the owner of a valuable oil portrait of the Hon. 
C. G. Memminger, the leader of the Board and for over thirty 
years its Chairman. The following is the correspondence 

relative to the donation : 

Charleston, July 30, 1903. 

Major Julian Mitchell. Acting Chairman Hoard School Com- 
mission a * : 

.My Dear Major: I was informed yesterday that in your 
new arrangements of the Normal School Building for young- 
ladies, which bears my father's name, your Superintendent 
wished to place an oil painting of my father. I have a most 
excellent portrait of him, and if your Commissioners desire 
a donation of it. it will give me pleasure to present it to the 
school, for in parting with it. I am, too, apprized of the fact 
that where you intend to place it will be where he himself 
would have liked it most to be. With much esteem and re- 
spect. I have the honor to remain, 

Very sincerelv vours, 

ALLARD MEMMINGER. 



Education in Charleston. 269 

To this letter Major Mitchell sent the following reply : 

Charleston, July 20th, 1903. 
Dr. Allan! Memminger, 34 Montague Street, City : 

My Dear Sir : Your letter of this date, donating an oil 

painting of your father, the late Hon. C. G. Memminger to 

the City Board of School Commissioners, has been received, 

and in the absence of the Chairman of the Board, the Hon. 

C. H. Simonton, it gives me pleasure to accept the gift. The 

Board of Commissioners will meet on the first Wednesday 

in October, when suitable action will be taken upon your 

present of the portrait of one who was the father of our 

Public Schools. We will be glad to have it during the first 

week in October. 

Yours truly, 

JULIAN MITCHELL, 

Acting Chairman Board School Commissioners. 

The action of Commissioner Mitchell was approved by the 
B« ard, and on his motion the following Preamble and Reso- 
lutions were unanimously adopted : 

Whereas, Dr. Allard Memminger, promoted by a desire 
to associate more closely the name of his distinguished 
father, the Hon. C- G. Memminger, with the school house 
tiiat bears it, has generously donated to the Board of School 
Commissioners of the City of Charleston an oil portrait of 
Mr. Memminger, and, 

Whereas, It is the desire of the Commissioners in accept- 
ing the same to give expression to their appreciation of the 
gift and the noble impulse that inspired it, therefore be it 

Resolved, That the thanks of the Board of School Com- 
missioners of the City of Charleston are eminently due, and 
are herewith respectfully tendered to Allard Memminger, 
M. D., for the portrait of his father. 

Resolved, That in recognition of the long and unstinted 
service rendered by Mr. Memminger to the cause of popular 
education in this city, and especially to the Memminger 



270 Mayor Smyth's Annual Review. 

Normal School, of which he was the Supervising Commis- 
sioner for many years, the portrait will be placed in the 
Assembly Room of that building. 

Resolved, Thai an engrossed copy of this Preamble and 
these Resolutions be suitably framed and sen! to Dr. Allard 
Memminger, by our Secretary. 

Resolved furl Iter, Thai they be published 1 in The News and 
( Courier. 

The instinct ions of the Board were carried out and a1 

their November meeting the following letter from Dr. Mem 

minger was read : 

Charleston, October 22nd, 1903. 

To the Commissioners and Member* of tlie Board of School 
. . Commissioners : 

Dear Sirs: I have just received through your esteemed 
Superintendent, Mr. II. P. Archer, the resolutions of thanks 
tendered me by your distinguished Board for the painting 
of my father. I can assure you I appreciate and esteem most 
highly the honor you gentlemen extend in sending me them. 
And in thanking you for this testimonial so beautifully en- 
grossed and framed, 1 desire to say that amongst my Lares 
et Penates I shall place them first, and always keep them so. 
With much esteem, I have the honor to be 

Yor\ trulv vours, 

ALLARD MEMMINGER- 

This letter was appreciated by the Board' and was ordered 
to be spread upon their minutes. 

TRIBUTE TO CITY TREASURER LEA. 

In view of the very acceptable service rendered to the 
B( ard by Mr. J. Orrin Lea, the City Treasurer of Charleston, 
th- following Preamble and Resolutions were unanimously 
adopted by them at their January meeting: 

Whereas, The efficient City Treasurer, Mr. J. Orrin Lea, 
cas for several years discharged in a manner most satisfac- 



Education in Charleston. 271 

trry to this Board the duty of collecting the special school 
tax of one mill for supporting the City Public Schools, and 

Whereas, It is the desire of this Board to give some ex- 
pression to their appreciation of Mr. Lea's worth and work, 
and to put that expression upon record, therefore, be it 

Resolved, That the Board of Public School Commissioners 
of the City of Charleston recognize in Mr. Lea a most capa- 
ble, trustworthy and zealous official, always ready to give 
information, not only to the members of the Finance Com- 
mittee, but to any and every member of our Board. 

Resolved, That it is the desire of this Board to commend 
Mr. Lea for the intelligent, pains-taking and industrious 
manner in which he conducts the management of his office, 
and for the neatness and accuracy with which his accounts 
are kept and his annual statements to this Board are made. 

Resolved, That this Preamble and these Resolutions be 
spread upon our Journal, that a copy of them be sent to Mr. 
Lc by our Secretary, and that they be published in The 
N**ws and Courier. 

This was a most gracious act on the part of the Board, 
but no more than Mr. Lea deserved. 

ANNUAL STATEMENT. 

Of Receipts and Disbursements from January 1st, 1903, to 
December 31st, 1903. 

RECEIPTS. 

Balance from 1902 $ 162 99 

Received from City Treasurer 68,364 85 

Received from City Treasurer for Teachers' Retirement Fund . 741 80 
Received from City Treasurer to refund County Treasurer 

B. R. Burnet, on account of overpayment on Dispensary 638 58 

Received from City Treasurer to refund over- payment on ac- 
count of Duplicate Tax of Mrs. Rebecca Sigwald 3 25 

Received from Henry Schachte, Agent 127 45 



Total Receipts.! $70,038 92 



Mayor Smyth's Annual Review. 



DISBURSEMENTS. 

Paid for Salaries $55,745 58 

Paid for Memminger Building . .. 4,000 00 

Paid for Repairs 1,525 04 

Paid for School Furniture 32:j 03 

Paid for Insurance . . 101 00 

Paid for Fuel 7s I 00 

Paid for Water Pent 22S 00 

Paid for Printing and Stationery 345 60 

Paid for Supplies 58100 

Paid for Incidentals 358 34 

Paid for Collecting School Tax 500 00 

Paid for making Poll Tax List 150 00 

Paid for Scholarships at the High School of Charleston 3,602 00 

Paid for Scholarship at Claflin 75 00 

Paid for Scholarship at State Colored College 4120 

Paid to Trustees of the Teachers' Retirement Fund 741 80 

laid to P>. P. Burnet, County Treasurer, as a refund for Dis- 
pensary account . . 638 58 

Paid as a refund on account of Duplicate Tax of Mrs. Rebecca 

Sigwald 3 25 

Total Disbursements $09,740 42 

Cash Balance December 31st, 1903 $ 298 50 

As aforetime i have made out and forwarded to the Hon. 
(>.];. Martin, State Superintendent of Education, through 
the office of William E. Milligan, Esq., County Superinten- 
dent of Education for Charleston County, the Annual Re- 
port of jour Board for the scholastic year ending June 30, 
1903; also the annual statement to the Hon. William T. 
Harris, United States Commissioner of Education at Wash- 
ington, D. C, and the Annual Report for the Mayor's Year 
Bock. 

Respectfully submitted, 

HENRY P. ARCHER, 
Superintendent Public Schools. 



Education in Charleston. 273 

HIGH SCHOOL OF CHARLESTON. 

Charleston, S. C, March 22, 1904. 

Eon. R. G. Rhett, Mayor, and the City Council of Charles- 
ton : 

Gentlemen : In compliance with your request I have the 
honor to forward the report of the Principal of the High 
■School of Charleston to the Board of Trustees, giving a de- 
tailed account of the condition of the school during the 
year 1903. This report of the Principal shows in full the 
great value of the school to the community and the appre- 
ciation of the importance of the school by the City Council 
of Charleston. 

With great regards, yours, &c, 

JULIAN MITCHELL, 
President Board of Trustees High School of Charleston. 



18 



-i I Mayor Smyth's Annual Review 



Charleston, S. C, December 31, 11)03. 

To the President and Trustees of (lie High School of Char- 
It ston : 

Gentlemen: I have the honor to make the following re- 
porl in regard to (he work and condition of the Eigh School 
for the pasl year : 

The attendance during the three sessions of the scholastic 
year ,ending December 31, 1903, is shown by the following 
table: 

JANUARY 1 TO MARCH 31. 

Firsl (lass 13 Pupils. 

Second Class 20 " 

Third Class 40 " 

Fourth Clas-,. Seel ion A . . 28 " 

Fourth Class, Section B 29 

Fourth Class, Section C 24 " 

Preparatory ( 'lass 14 " 

Total 180 " 

april i to .hxf ::o. 

First (lass 12 Pupils. 

Seond Class 24 " 

Thrd Class 44 " 

Fourth Class, Section A 28 

Fourth Class. Section B 20 " 

Fourth Class. Section C 24 " 

Preparatory Class 14 " 

Total 175 " 

OCTOBER 1 TO DECEMBER 31. 

First Class 18 Pupils. 

Second Class 28 

Third Class 59 

Fourth Class. Section A 33 

Fourth Class. Section B 33 

Fourth Class, Section C 30 

Preparatory Class 14 

Total 221 



Education in Charleston. 275 

The enrollment at the opening of the session in October 
(was the largest in the history of the school, having reached 
a total of two hundred and twenty-one pupils, a record 
that was approached only twice before. Just previous to 
the sixties, when the number in attendance was two hundred 
and six, and again in 1899, when the register showed two 
hundred and nine pupils on the roll. 

This is most gratifying and shows that the community is 
appreciating the advantages offered by the school for a care- 
ful and thorough secondary education. 

The City Council has manifested its interest in the insti- 
tution and has continued its liberal policy toward the school 
in the past year. A special appropriation of $375.00 was 
expended for placing in the halls and rooms of the annex 
metal ceilings of ornamental design to replace those of plas- 
ter which had been used when the building was erected. 

At the close of the session in June, 1903, Mr. Alexander 
M. Bull, who was in charge of the commercial department, 
and who had rendered faithful and valuable service for two 
years, in developing to the highest form of efficiency the 
course in Bookkeeping and Stenography, tendered his resig- 
nation, in order to accept a position in another field of 
work. The Trustees secured the services of Mr. Frederick 
Muller, who was well qualified for the duties of the position 
by careful study and training. He has been carrying on with 
much zeal and enthusiasm, the work so acceptably and suc- 
cessfully done by his predecessor. 

The aim has been, in laying out the studies for this course 
or department, to provide that it should include as good a 
knowledge as possible of the English branches, a legible 
rapid handwriting, a working knowledge of bookkeeping, an 
ability to perforin arithmetical calculations with accuracy 
and dispatch, an acquaintance with commercial forms and 
usages, an ability to take down in shorthand a letter or other 
matter dictated at a moderate rate of speed, and to properly 
understand the use and capabilities of the typewriter. 

It is a mistake to suppose that the commercial course in 
a school should take the place of all other studies. It should 
parallel as nearly as possible the liberal course and, in a 



276 Mayor Smyth's Annual Review. 

general way, ii should differ from il only in the amount of 
time given to certain subjects; and the pupils should be 
fcarefully drilled in those studies thai are recognized as be- 
ing the foundation of a person's education, regardless of 
what .special lines he may intend to follow as liis life work. 

In (his way, and in this way only ,can we develop the pu- 
pil mentally J rain him to think clearly and accurately, and 
teach him that the "commercial course is not 1o be consid- 
ered a sort of educational catch-all in which all the lazy and 
incompetent pupils may find a place." 

In the departments of .Mathematics, (lassies, English and 
Modern Languages, good and faithful work has been ac- 
complished. The course is well planned and well rounded. 
The pupils are thoroughly drilled in the (dements of the 
various branches and frequent examinations are held to test 
1he knowledge of the student. Special attention is paid to 
the subject of English Composition and the pupils are re- 
quired to write both short and long essays, sometimes out 
of the class room and again under the immediate supervis- 
ion of the teacher. 

The department of physical training continues to be a 
valuable part of the school curriculum. Under the pains 
taking care of Prof. F. P. Valdes the course in gymnastics 
is made especially helpful to the pupils, and its effect is 
evident in the vigor and carriage of those who attend the 
school. 

The sixty-fourth session of the school closed June 26th. 
The closing exercises were held in the auditorium of the 
school and proved most interesting to the large audience 
which attested by their presence an interest in the welfare 
of the institution. The graduating class of eleven members 
'received from the president of the board, Major Julian 
Mitchell, the certificates, attesting that they had success- 
fully completed the prescribed course of study. 

The following are the names of the graduates: John C. 
Ball, Richard L. de Saussure, Samuel Hughes, Jr., Alexander 
M. Mclver, Jr., L. Harry Mixson, Thomas F. Mosiman, P. 
LeKoy Pinkussohn, H. Read Simons, Jr., W. Lucas Simons, 
John Hauckel Taylor, Francis M. Weston. 



Education in Charleston. 277 

In the first class the gold medal for general excellence in 
^scholarship was won by Thomas F. Mosiman. The second 
honor was awarded to John Hanckel Taylor. The Ferguson- 
Colcock Conduct Medal was awarded by vote of the class to 
John 0. Ball. Hon. D. Huger Sinkler, in presenting the 
medals, referred to the gift of the Colcock Medal by the noble 
and high-spirited boy who was cut oft' in the flower of his 
youth just before completing his course at the school. 

In an eloquent and thoughtful address he spoke of the 
development of character and of its value in life. He urged 
upon the pupils the necessity that each one should build an 
ii] right and manly character and should imitate the virtues 
of the founders of the medal and strive to attain to the high 
standard which had been set for all time by this reward for 
g( od behavior and honorable conduct. 

In the Second Class, the gold medal for scholarship was 
awarded to E. Kennerly Marshall, Jr., next in merit, Edward 
SB. Plenge. 

In the Third Class and the three sections of the Fourth 
Class, the first places were held by F. William Cappelmann, 
Edmund Kracke, J. Robertson Paul and Edward J. Coiiiar, 
Jr. 

It is a matter worthy of record that in the past five years 
all of the young men who have obtained appointments to 
the government Military Academies at West Point and An- 
napolis, when the competition has been open to Charleston 
boys, have been graduates of the High School of Charleston 
or have attended thf rchool and received a part of their 
training in the institution. This is a matter of much pride 
and gratification and speaks well for the sound and careful 
preparation offered by the school. 

Robert C. Richardson, High School Class of '98, appoint- 
ed to West Point. 

Joseph J. Grace, Class of 1900, appointed to West Point 
(at large.) 

Paul M. MacMillan, Class of 1900, appointed to Annapolis 
and holder of the appointment to West Point. 

Robert S. Simons, Class of 190Q, appointed to Annapolis 
and West Point and holder of the appointment at large to 
West Point. 



278 Mayor Smyth's Annual Review. 

Arthur L. Bristol, Jr., class of L901, appointed a1 large to 
Annapolis. 

George C. Logan, ('lass of L901, appointed to Annapolis. 

Julian 0. Collins, appointed 1<> Annapolis (at large) was 
a pupil a! the Bigh School for two years. 

The past year lias been a prosperous one for the scl I. 

The teachers of the several departments have one and all 
'labored zealously 1o keep up the work to the very highesl 
standard of excellence, and to maintain the reputation (lie 
school has hold in the community for good and faithful 
work. Respectfully submitted, 

W. M. WHITEHEA I >. 
Principal of the High School of Charleston. 



Education in Charleston. 279 

COLLEGE OF CHARLESTON. 

PRESIDENT'S REPORT. 

To the Board of Trustees: 

The President of the College 1ms the honor to submit to the 
Board of Trustees the following report for the year ending 
December 31, 1903. 

The only change in the Faculty has been caused by the re- 
signation of Prof. George Hall Ashley, Professor of Biologv 
and Geology, and Curator of the Museum. He had been pro- 
fessor in the College since 1900 and resigned to accept a very 
desirable position in Washington Avith the United States 
Geological Survey. Many important features in the recent 
development of the College we owe to the initiative, the zeal, 
and the untiring labours of Prof. Ashley. The systematic re- 
arrangement of the collections of the Museum according to 
modern scientific principles and the publication of the first 
museum guide are conspicuous among the many results of 
his valuable work. He was the first to teach the biological 
sciences as a part of the curriculum of the College, and with 
equipment which amounted to next to nothing he conducted 
the work of his department with vigor and success. 

Paul Marshall Rea was appointed Professor of Biology 
and Geology, and Curator of the Museum, to fill the vacancy 
caused by the resignation of Prof. Ashley. Mr. Rea took the 
degree of B. A. from Williams College, Massachusetts, in 
1S99, and the Master's degree in 1901. For two years he 
pursued graduate courses at Columbia University, during 
one of which he was University Scholar in Zoology, and af- 
terwards was Assistant in Biology at Williams College. In 
addition Mr. Rea has had valuable experience in the Marine 
Biological Laboratory at Woods Hole, Massachusetts, and 
in field work with the Bureau of Forestry, United States 
T3epartment of Agriculture. 

The number of students in attendance slowly Tmt steadily 
increases, the gain being from outside Charleston. This is 
certainly the most important factor at present in the devel- 



280 Mayor Smyth's Annual Review. 

opment of the College, [mprovemenl is not L'apid, bill this 
must not be expected "under the conditions. The attempt to 
attract students from outside Charleston is a policy slill o] 
if » nt adoption, and on accounl of lack of means Cor carry- 
ing 1 on the more vigorous personal canvass for a wider pat 
fonage that is almost universal with the colleges of* today, 
we have had to content ourselves merely with a slowly grow- 
ing appreciation abroad of the efficient and thorough work 
here and of* the standards which our independent financial 
position enables us to maintain. This appreciation is ex- 
tending only through the modest, newspaper advertising 
we are able to undertake, and through the graduates and 
former students who are now beginning to be scattered 
t!i7'ough the Stale, forming in each instance a new center oi 
influence. And besides these limitations to our efforts in 
gaining new patronage which arise from our lack of means, 
there seem to be circumstances which operate against our 
retaining a fair percentage of students through the whole 
four years of the college course. In this connection there is 
disadvantage in the location of the College in a city of com- 
paratively large size where the numerous clerkships and 
other positions in mercantile life tend to tempt away the 
underclassman who is meeting with only moderate success. 
He is often unable to concentrate his full energies on his col- 
lege work on account of a. lack of fixity of purpose, caused 
often by tl e >': w '•': he sees his fellows drop off, and 

the lack, perhaps, of some counteracting influence at home. 
Last year we lost forty-one per cent of our student body at 
the end of the year. Only fifteen per cent was by giadna- 
tion, and twenty-six per cent through withdrawal. In every 
case they were students who had failed to keep up with their 
classes. 

In spite of these heavy losses, however, the Freshman 
(lass more than made up the deficiency and we have this 
year the largest enrollment since 1850. This addition to 
our numbers has been made with no sacrifice of our require- 
ments for admission, as is shown by the fact that of those 
applying for entrance this year twenty per cent failed to 
pass the examinations. These were for the most part those 



Education in Charleston. 281 

whc took the examinations which are hold m July of each 
Year at the different county seats through the State. There 
are now twenty-seven students from outside Charleston, rep- 
resenting the following counties: Georgetown, Hampton, 
Barnwell, Berkeley, Dorchester, Williamsburg, Orangeburg, 
Darlington, Marlboro, Aiken, Edgefield, Greenwood, Fair- 
field, Chester, York, Laurens, and Oconee. As the Dormitory 
accommodates now only twenty there is need of devising 
some plan at once by which the accommodations there shall 
be increased. 

The work of the College is now organized into eight de- 
partments of instruction, the Library, and the Museum. The 
departments of instruction are those of Latin and Greek. 
French and German, English, History and Economics, Math- 
ematics, Chemistry and Physics, Biology and Geology, and 
Engineering. There are fifty-eight yearly courses offered. 
Each department has been ably andl faithfully conducted by 
the professors in charge, and the work has proceeded smooth- 
ly and with success. 

The equipment of the Biological Laboratory has been im- 
proved during the year by the addition of five microscopes, 
a. microtome, and other apparatus, costing about $340, and 
for the Engineering workshops there have been purchased 
a circular saw and some further additions to the equipment, 
costing about $180. But the growth of our scientific depart- 
ments in equipment is painfully slow. Almost all of our an- 
nual income — now about $15,700, exclusive of scholarship 
funds — is needed for salaries and general running expenses, 
and there is left almost nothing for the support and develop- 
ment of the three scientific departments. A gift of $500 to 
any one of them would go far toward increasing the efficien- 
cy of its work. In this connection I would gratefully record 
in this report two gifts to the college during the present year, 
one of $100 to the Library by a friend in the North for the 
purchase of books for the department of History and Eco- 
nomics, and the other, also from a friend in the North, of a 
cement testing machine for the Engineering department, 
costing about $250. Further the College has had an addi- 



282 Mayor Smyth's Annual Review. 

iional endowed scholarship added to its lisl of scholarships 

(he "Edward R. .Miles Scholarship," founded upon a be- 
<iuesi of $1,000 by the late Mrs. Edward R. .Miles for (his 
purpose. 11 seems peculiarly fitting thai (lie name of a fam- 
ily which lias been conspicuously associated with the Col- 
lege for more than sixty years should have this permanent 
plaee in its life. 

Jn the Library, the work upon the card catalogue steadily 
gees forward, and is being done in a most thorough and ex- 
cellent manner by the efficient Librarian, Miss E. A. Bull. 
We are unable to get full benefit of this work, however, be- 
cause of the lack of a case Cor the cards. It would cost only 
fifty or sixty dollars, but on account of the present need of 
the scientific departments, we have been unable as yet to 
provide this cabinet which is really essential to a use of the 
card catalogue by the professors and students. 

The arrangement now in effect between the College and the 
Charleston Library Society by which the students have full 
use of that library increases enormously our library facili- 
ties. The collection of scientific, technical, and semi-techni- 
cal books in the Charleston Library is already valuable and 
is being rapidly increased, selections being chiefly made by 
professors in the College. This arrangement has placed the 
College at once on a footing probably equal in this particu- 
lar to that of any institution in the State, and in the depart- 
ments of English, Classics, and History ahead of most of 
them. 

In regard to the Museum, your attention is respectfully in- 
vited to the report of the Curator, which is attached to this 
report. 

At present the most serious problem confronting us is the 
lack of adequate room in the College building to accommo- 
date the departments of instruction in their present ex- 
panding condition. The Engineering department requires 
the four rooms in the basement of the east and west wings 
for drawing room, lecture room, and work shops. This 
leaves no room for the Chemical laboratory and for the de- 
partment of History. In addition, the department of Biol- 



Education in Charleston. 283 

ogy has been crowded to the Museum floor where it occupies 
two small rooms — the west hallway which has ben converted 
into a class room, and the small tower room in the fourth 
story. When the classes were smaller these rooms in a way 
answered the purpose. But this year, with laboratory class- 
es of sixteen or eighteen, there was simply not space enough 
for as many tables as were necessary in the microscopic and 
dissecting work. Something had to be done, and as a tem- 
porary makeshift the Biological laboratory was moved 
down to the room used by the Physical laboratory, the two 
laboratories occupying the same room. This is a most in- 
convenient arrangement, and with larger classes can not con- 
tinue. Thus, if the Engineering department is given the 
space it urgently requires, there will be three departments 
entirely without accommodations, just as there is now al- 
ready one in this condition. This extreme crowding is due 
to the fact that the entire upper floor of the College building 
is occupied by the Museum collections, leaving the first floor 
and basement to accommodate all the departments of in- 
struction, the Chapel, and the Literary Society hall. And 
though all this room given up to the Museum is at the cost 
of full efficiency and convenience to the general college work, 
it by no means satisfies the requirements of the Museum. 
These unusual scientific collections constitute the finest pos- 
session of the College. To show them off to proper advant- 
age they should be housed in a building of their own, built 
especially for the purpose. As they are constantly used in 
connection with the college work in zoology, botany and 
geology, and contribute to making this part of the college 
work particularly strong, they should not be separated from 
the departmentof Biology, and such a building should there- 
fore be in the immediate vicinity of the College. But apart 
from the advantage to the College of an arrangement of this 
kind, it is to be remembered that museums exist primarily for 
the exhibition of objects, that they are largely for the public, 
and that at present the community does not get full advant- 
age of the presence in Charleston of what are really the 
finest scientific collections south of Washington, on account 
of their being crowded into rooms of insufficient size, incon- 



_' s I Major Smyth's Amu'"/ Review. 

veniently arranged, and improperly and insufficiently light- 
ed. A building of the kind 1 have indicated, enabling the 
Curator of the Museum to carry ou1 fully his plans for spe- 
cial exhibits of an industrial nature exhibiting the resources 
of the State and the industries of the city, would prove a 
most effective advertisement for (he city, apart from its dis- 
til ci benefit to the College. I f the upper floor of the College 
bu Iding were open to the departments of instruction the 
question of space would be solved for some time io come. I 
would ask that this mailer be given careful consideration, 
and would recommend that a plan be devised by which prop- 
erly in tlie immediate vicinity of the. College be secured, so 
that the three departments now so cramped and crowded can 
be temporarily accommodated, and the whole arrangement 
be carried out with a view io building upon such a site a 
building for the Museum and the Biological department of 
the College. 

HARRISON RANDOLPH, President 
Charleston, March 28, 1904. 



Education in Charleston. 285 

THE MUSEUM. 

To the President of the College of Charleston: 

Sir: I have the honor to submit the following report on 
the condition of the Museum: 

The College of Charleston Museum was founded in 1850 
as a result of the interest in natural history aroused in 
Charleston by the work of Elliott, Holbrook, Audubon, 
.Bachman and Agassiz. About this time museums of a simi- 
lar character were established in many colleges throughout 
the country and formed a complete expression of the natural 
science of the time. Their object was purely "systematic," 
i. e., the collection and classification of the largest possible 
number of natural history specimens, and the natural 
science taught in the colleges was directly dependent on the 
facilities offered .by the museums. Since 1850 a great change 
has taken place in scientific aims and methods. Systematic 
work has been given over to specialists and college courses in 
biology are now devoted to the study of the general princi- 
ples which underlie the structure and activity of animal and 
plant life and the relation of these to each other and to sur- 
rounding conditions. For this purpose only a small but very 
carefully selected teaching collection is necessary. 

Because large museums are no longer maintained by col- 
leges as instruments of undergraduate instruction it by no 
ireans follows, however, that their usefulness has passed. 
They have developed as rapidly as the sciences with which 
they are associated and, adopting new methods to meet new 
conditions, are working more intelligently and effectively 
than ever before. Museums are now conducted with two 
widely different aims. One is to provide very complete and 
unusual facilities for the research work of specialists and 
the other is to use the museum as a means of awakening pub- 
lic interest in nature and science and in the relation of these 
to human interests. A wide variety of means is used to ac- 
complish these ends. Besides the systematic collections of 
the old days, exhibits can be arranged to illustrate a large 
number of special topics, e. g., local resources and the use 
which is being made of them ; the economic value of certain 



286 31 ayor Smyth's Annual Review. 

group^ of animals, plants, or minerals; the history of lim 
earth and the life upon il ; the relal ion of an i ma Is and plants 
to one another and to their environraenl ; the distribution of 
:;ninials and plants over the earth ; and always the economic 
aspect of exhibits and their relation to man. Every collec- 
tion of this nature leaches a definite lesson of practical value 
and makes the museum a factor of grea-1 importance in pub- 
lic education as well as an exhibition of the resources of the 
State which can not fail to be helpful. Public attention may 
be called to such exhibits through the daily press and il is 
desirable that public lectures of an informal nature be given 
in explanation of various exhibits and these can be used to 
supplement the work of the public schools. 

The College of Charleston Museum should be regarded as 
a public institution under the auspices of the College, its 
purposes are eminently public spirited and its whole history 
and equipment til it for effective work on modern lines. The 
foregoing discussions of the functions of museums is at the 
same time an outline of the work which the College of Char- 
leston Museum wishes to perform. For this purpose a con- 
tinuation of the financial support accorded the Museum In 
the past is necessary. Merely to maintain the efficiency 01 
the Museum and prevent deterioration of material in which 
the city has invested money in past years $500 per annum is 
necessary. Any further increase in the appropriation will 
produce results proportionately very much greater. The 
former appropriation of $900 or $1,000 would give Charles- 
ton an effective Museum of greater public value. 

The cost of Museum accessions and even of maintenance is 
large and there is need for immediate expenditure to pre- 
serve some of the most valuable property of the Museum. 
r J be Stephen Elliott Herbarium is of priceless scientific value 
xvt much of it has been irretrievably damaged because of the 
iack of proper care, which the College was unable to pro- 
vide. A very advantageous arrangement has this year been 
. oncluded whereby this collection is being renovated by the 
Biltmore Harharium but all of this will avail little unless 
the Museum can provide a fire proof vault in which to store 
this collection when it is returned. 



Education in Charleston. 287 

As a beginning of active public work in the, Museum a visi 
tors' book has been placed near the entrance and it is pro- 
posed to add a turnstile to record the number of visitors. By 
these means it will always be possible to determine the suc- 
cess of special exhibits, advertising, or other means adopted 
lo increase the efficiency of the administration of the 
Museum. 

PAUL M. REA, Curator. 



288 Mayor Smyth's Annual Review. 



ORDINANCE RATIFIED DURING THE YEAR 1903, 



ORDINANCE Ratified in L903, since the Ratification of the Revised 
Ordinance December 8, 1903. 

AN ORDINANCE to suspend the ordiance to regulate the storage of 
inflammable oils within the limits of the city of Charleston for sixty 

days. 

That whereas il appears from the petition of the Standard Oil Company 
that the said company lias purchased a tract of land outside of the city 
limits of the city of Charleston and is proceeding with all due diligence to 
erect its tanks and warehouses thereon, so as to enable it to comply with 
the ordinance of the city of Charleston by the removal of its present plant 
from the city, be it ordained by the Mayor and Alderman of the city of 
Charleston in Council assembled thai the ordinance entitled "an ordinance 
to regulate the storage of inflammable oils within the limits of the city of 
Charleston,'' or so far as the same applies to the present plant of the Stan- 
dard Oil Company, situated within the limits of the city of Charleston, be 
and the same is hereby suspended for a period of sixty days from the first 
day of January, 1904, so as to permit of the removal of the said plant of the 
Standard Oil Company from the envy of Charleston in compliance with the 
provisions of said ordinance. 

Ratified December 9, 1903. 



Acts Relating to the Ctty of Charleston, 1903. 289 



ACTS AND JOINT RESOLUTIONS OF THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY 
OF THE STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA 

RELATING TO THE CITY OF CHARLESTON. 



AN ACT to Amend Section 258 of the Civil Code, 1902, by Prescribing 
Certain Qualifications for Voters in and Certain Regulations in Con- 
nection With Party Registration for Primary Elections in Counties 
Containing a City of Forty Thousand Inhabitants or More, and for the 
Prevention of Frauds and Illegal Voting in the Same. 

Section 1. Be it enacted by the General Assembly of the State of 
South Carolina, That Section 258 of the Civil Code of 1902, be amended 
by adding at the end thereof the following: Provided, That m Counties 
containing a city of forty thousand inhabitants or more, the following 
provisions shall obtain for all primaries, State County and municipal : 
Each voter in any primary election must be of the age prescribed by the 
rules of the party and must have been a resident of the State for one 
year, and in the County in which he offers to vote for sixty days next 
preceeding such primary; and he must have been duly registered in the 
party registration of voters, under the regulations prescribed by the 
rules of the party, at least sixty days before the holding of such primary 
election on a club roll which shall have been duly filed as hereinafter 
provided for, and he shall have paid his poll tax sixty days prior to any 
such primary election. It shall be the duty of the President and Secre- 
tary, and of either or both of them, of every party club or similar 
organization in such Counties as aforesaid, to file in the office of the 
County Auditor of the County, sixty days before the date of every 
primary election in such party, the club list or club roll of registered 
members of such club or other similar organization, arranged alpha- 
betically, and numbered consecutively, certified under the hands of said 
officers, giving places of residence, indicating street and number of the 
street in cities or other localities where street numbering is generally 
employed ; and such certified lists or rolls shall remain in said office under 
the care and the custody of the County Auditor, subject at all times 
during the usual hours when the said office may be open to public inspec- 
tion, examination and copying by interested parties, subject only ro such 
restrictions as may be necessary to the preservation and safe guarding 
of the same; and it shall be the duty of the County Auditor, on demand, 
upon payment of his fees, in advance, not exceeding the sum of one (1) 
cent for every name, with its appropriate data, to furnish within the 
space of five (5) days after such demand a copy or copies ot any one or 
19 



lM'O •'/ lor Smyth's Ainnnil Review. 

more of said certified lists or rolls; and the said original certified lists or 
rolls -i» Hied as a tor.-;, id. shall remain until called for and receipted for 
by the proper representative of the County or the municipal Executive 
Committee, who shall withdraw the same not sooner than the day before 
rjhe said primary, as to lists or rolls of city clubs, or three (3) days 
before as to other clubs. The club rolls which have been so filed shall 
constitute the registration list at the respective precincts in all primary 
e'eetions. No name shall be ;uUU>i\ to said list or rolls after they have 
been so tiled with the Auditor, nor shall further registration or registra- 
tion certificate be required as a prerequisite to voting at any primary 
At the same time and place, the said President and Secretary, either or 
hoih of them shall file, together with the club lists or rolls, the 
written application for membership hereinabove mentioned; and fcnese 
applications shall be preserved as permanent records in the said 
Auditor's office for the space of one year after filing of same, subject to 
the same provisions for examination by interested parties as applied to 
the club rolls. It shall be t he duty of the County Treasurer to prepare 
and file in the office of the County Auditor, sixty days before such 
primary, a list, alphabetically arranged and numbered, of all persons 
who have paid their poll tax at the time of the preparation and filing of 
said list, including therein those who are by law exempt from the pay- 
ment of •' poll tax. Every one, however, who is exempt from the pay- 
rrenf of a poll tax shall tile with the County Treasurer, at least sixty 
days before the primary, an affidavit to that effect, or otherwise satisfy 
the County Treasurer to that effect, or else his name shall not be placed 
on the said lists and he be entitled to vote at the approaching primary. 
At the same time the County Treasurer shall furnish a duplicate list 
(to that furnished the Auditor) to the Chairman of the Executive Com- 
mittee of the party about to hold the primary; and the said Executive 
Committee shall divide these names into as many lists as there are to 
be polling places at .the primary, so that each name may be assigned to 
its proper polling place, and no name shall appear on more than one list, 
and these lists shall be lodged by the Chairman of the Executive Com- 
mittee, municipal or County, in the office of the County Auditor, fifteen 
days prior to any election, for the purposes of examination, revision or 
correction by any person or persons interested, who upon affidavit filed 
that he lias been assigned to the wrong precinct, or been omitted from 
the list, shall be entitled to have a correction made by the Chairman of 
the Executive Committee and these segregated lists shall be published 
by the Chairman of the Executive Committee in a daily newspaper pub- 
lished in the County where such election is held, and such publication 
shall be at the expense of the Executive Committee. County or munici- 
pal. The lists, when corrected, shall be delivered to the Executive Com- 
mittee at the same time as the club rolls. And the appearance of the 
name of any person upon the certified poll tax list herein provided for 
shall be sufficient evidence of the payment of the said poll tax, and 



Acts Relating to I lie 6% of Charleston, 1903. 291 

said list shall remain under the care and custody of the County Au- 
ditor, subject at all times during the usual hours when t no said office 
may be open, to public inspection, examination and copying by inter- 
ested parties, subject only to such restrictions as may be necessary 
to the preservation and safe guarding of the same; and it snal] be the 
duty of the County Auditor, on demand, upon payment of his fees in 
advance, not exceeding the sum of one cent for every name, with 
its appropriate data, to furnish within the space of five days after 
such demand a copy or copies of any one or more of said certified lists 
or ro\ts. No person shall be qualified to vote at said primary un- 
less his name appear on both the said lists so filed as aforesaid, and 
then only at the polling place appropriate, under the rules of the 
party, to said registered residence. The failure of any officer men- 
tioned in this Section to properly perform the duties made incumbent 
on him hereby, shall be deemed a misdemeanor, punishable by a fine 
of not less than twenty-five ($25) dollars, nor more than two hun- 
dred ($200) dollars, or by imprisonment for a period of not exceeding 
three (3) months, or both, at the discretion of the Court; so that said 
Section as amended shall read as follows: 

Section 258. That candidates in all Counties in which there is a city 
containing twenty thousand inhabitants, or more, shall have the right 
to appoint a watcher at each polling place to look after the interest 
of such candidates. And in all cities of twenty thousand inhabitants 
or over there shall be a party registration of voters under regula- 
tions to be prescribed by the rules of the party: Provided, That in 
Counties containing a city of forty thousand inhabitants or more, the 
following provisions shall obtain for all primaries, State, County and 
municipal: Each voter in any primary election must be of the age 
prescribed by the rules of the party, and must have been a resident 
of the State for one year, and in the County in which he offers to 
vote for sixty days next preceding such primary; and he must have 
been duly registered in the party registration of voters, under the reg- 
ulations prescribed by the rules of the party, at least sixty days before 
the holding of such primary election, on a club roll which shall have 
been duly filed as hereinafter provided for. and he shall have paid his 
poll tax sixty days prior to any such primary election. It shall be the 
duty of the President and Secretary, and of either or both of them, 
of every party club or similar organization in such Counties as afore- 
said, to file in the office of the County Auditor of the County, sixty 
days before the date of every primary election in such party, the club 
list or club roll of registered members of such club or other similar 
organization, arranged alphabetically and numbered consecutively, 
certified under the hands of said officers, giving places of residence, 
indicating street and number of the street in cities or other locali- 
ties where street numbering is generally employed, and such certified 
lists or rolls shall remain in said office under the care and the custody of 



L ,, < t•_ , Mayor Smyth's Annual Review. 

the Counts Auditor, subjecl al all times during the usual hours when 

the ^aitl oilier may be open, to public inspection, examination and 

copying by interested parties, subjecl only to such restrictions as 

1 1 1 ; i \ he necessary to the preservation and safe guarding of the same: 

and it shall be the duly of the County Auditor, on demand, upon pay- 
ment of his lees in advance, not exceeding the sum of one in cent 
for even name, with its appropriate data, to furnish within the space 
of five (5) days after such demand a copy or copies of any one or more 
of said certified lists or rolls; and the said original certified lists or rolls 
so tiled as aforesaid, shall remain until called for and receipted tor l.\ 
the proper representative of the County or the municipal Executive 
Committee, who shall withdraw the same not sooner than the day before 
i h i said primary, as to lists or rolls of city clubs, or three (3) days 
before as to other clubs. The club rolls which have been so filed shall 
ron-iit ute the registration list at the respective precincts in all primary 
elections. No name shall be added to said list or rolls after they have 
been so filed with the Auditor, nor shall further registration or registra- 
tion certificate be required as a prerequisite to voting at any primary. 
Al the same time and place, the said ['resident and Secretary, either or 
both of them, shall file, together with the said club lists or rolls, the 
writ ttn application for membership hereinabove mentioned; and these 
applications shall he preserved as permanent records in the said 
Auditor's 1 office for the space of one year after tiling of same, subject 
to the same provisions for examination by interested parties as applied 
to the club rolls. If shall he the duty of the County Treasurer to pre- 
pare and tile in the office of the County Auditor, sixty days before such 
primary, a list, alphabetically arranged and numbered, of all persons who 
have paid their poll tax at the time of the preparation and filing of said 
list, including therein those who are by law exempt from the pnyment of 
a p'.ll tax. Every one, however, who is exempt from the payment of a 
poll tax shall tile with the County Treasurer, at least sixty days betore 
the primary, an affidavit to that effect, or otherwise satisfy the County 
Treasurer to thai effect, or else his name shall not be placed on the said 
lists and he he entitled to vote at the approaching primary. At the 
same lime, the County Treasure]- shall furnish a duplicate list (to that 
furnished the Auditor) to the Chairman of the Executive Committee of 
the party about to hold the primary; and the Executive Committee 
shall divide these names into as many lists as there are to be polling 
places at the primary, so that each name may be assigned to its proper 
polling place, and no name shall appear on more than one list, and these 
lists shall be lodged by the Chairman of the Executive Committer, 
County or municipal, in the office of the County Auditor, fifteen days 
prior to any election, for purposes of examination, revision or correction 
by any person or persons interested, who upon affidavit filed that he has 
been assigned to the wrong precinct, or been omitted from the list 
shall be entitled to have a correction made by the Chairman of the 



Acts Relating to the City of Charleston, 1903. 293 

Executive Committee, and these segregated lists shall, be published by 
the Chairman of the Executive Committee in a daily newspaper pub- 
lished in the Comity where such election is held, and said publication 
shall be at the expense of the Executive Committee, County or municipal. 
The lists, when corrected, shall be delivered to the Executive com- 
mittee at the same time as the club rolls, and the appearance of the 
name of any person upon the certified poll tax list herein provided for 
shall be sufficient evidence of the payment of the said poll tax, and said 
list remain under the care and custody of the County Auditor, subject 
at all times during the usual hours when the said office may be open, to 
public inspection, examination and copying by interested parties, subject 
only to such restrictions as may be necessary to the preservation and 
safe guarding of the same; and it shall be the duty of the County 
Auditor, on demand, upon payment of his fees, in advance, not exceeding 
the sum of one cent for every name, with its appropriate data, to 
furnish Avithin the space of five days after such demand a cop^ or copies 
of any one or more of said certified lists or rolls. No person shall be 
qualified to vote at said primary unles his name appear on both the 
said lists so filed as aforesaid, and then only at the polling place appro- 
priate, under the rules of the party, to said registered residence. The 
failure of any officer mentioned in this Section to properly perform the 
duties made incumbent upon him hereby, shall be deemed a misdemeanor, 
punishable by a fine of not less than twenty-five (25) dollars, nor more 
than two hundred ($200) dollars, or by imprisonment for a period of not 
exceeding three (3) months, or both, at the discretion of the Court. 
Approved the 23d day of February, A. D., 1903. 



AN ACT to Amend Chapter LXXXIX., of the Civil Code of South Caro- 
lina of 1902, Relating to the City Court of Charleston, oy onangmg 
the Title of Said Chapter, and by Adding Certain Sections Thereto. 

Section 1. Be it enacted by the General Assembly of the State of 
South Carolina, That Chapter LXXXIX., of the Civil Code of South 
Carolina of 1902, be amended by inserting after the word "Court," in the 
title, the words "and the Police Court;" so that the title of said Chaptei 
shall be "The City Court and the Police Court of Charleston," and by 
making the following amendments to the following sections of said 
Charter : 

That Section 2779 be amended by striking out the words, "except as 
provided in Section 2780," on line 2 of said section. 

That Section 2780 be amended by changing the number of said sec- 
tion, so that said section shall be known as Section 2791, and by insert- 
ing in the beginning of such section the words, "There shall be estab- 
lished a Court in the city of Charleston known as the Police Court of the 
city of Charleston, which shall be held by the Recorder of the city of 
Charleston." 



204 Mayor Smyttis Annual Review. 

\<\ changing the numbering of "Section 2781, so thai said section shall 
be know n as Sect i< >n 2792. 

By clianginb the numbering of Section 2782, so thai said section shall 
In- known as Sect ion 2793. 

By changing the numbering of Seel ion 2783, so thai said section shall 
be known as Section 2794. 

By changing the numbering of Section 2784, so thai said section shall 
be known as Seel ion 2795. 

By changing the numbering of Section 2782, so thai said section shall 
be known as Sect ion 2796. 

By inserting after Section 2779, as herein amended, a section to be 
know I) as Section 2780, as follows: 

Section 2780. All issues, controversies and litigations in the said 
Court, if demanded by either party, shall be tried by a jury composed 
of si.\ persons, according to the regulations and forms prescribed by law 
m cases of trial by jury, and as hereinafter provided. 

By inserting after said Section 2780, a section to be known as Seel ion 
2781, as follows: 

Section 2781. The Clerk of the City Court, the City Treasurer and the 
City Assessor shall constitute the Board <>f Jury Commissioners for the 
City Court of Charleston; Provided, In case any member of the Board 
of Jury Commissioners fail to attend for the purpose of drawing a jury, 
a majority of the Board may act. The City Sheriff shall, upon the 
passage of this Act, and hereafter on the 1st day of January of each 
year, provide a list of twenty-five hundred legally qualified jurors, from 
which list the Board of Jury Commissioners shall cause the names to be 
written, each one on a separate paper or ballot, and shall fold up said 
pieces of paper or ballots so as to resemble each other as much as pos- 
sible, so that the names written thereon shall not be visible on the 
outside, and shall place them with the said list in a box to be furnished 
to them by the City Council of Charleston, which box shall be in custody 
of the Clerk of Court. The jury box shall be provided with three 
locks, each different. The key to one lock shall be kept by the Clerk of 
the City Court, one by the City Treasurer and one by City Assessor, 
so that no two of said Commissioners shall hold keys to t)\o same lock. 
When jurors are to be drawn, the Board of Jury Commissioners shall 
attend at the office of the Clerk of the City Court, and in ttie presence 
of the Sheriff, shall shake up the names of the jury box until tney are 
well mixed, and having unlocked said box, the Board of Jury commis- 
sioners, or a majority of them, shall proceed to draw therefrom, without 
seeing the names writen thereon, a number of ballots equal to the 
number of jurors required, and which jury shall be summoned for the 
trial of causes in like manner and under the same penalties as are estab- 
lished by law and usage in the Circuit Court; Provided, That no "venire 
facias" shall at any time issue for more than eighteen jurors to serve 
at one Court, from whom a jury (or two juries, if the Recorder shall 



Acts Belating to the City of Charleston, 1903. 295 

regard more than one jury necesary for the proper dispatch of the 
business before the Court,) shall be impanelled; and in ease ot non- 
attendance of the jurors so drawn and summoned, their places may be 
supplied to talesmen, drawn in the usual mode; but no person shall 
be liable to serve twice until all the names in the said jury box shall be 
drawn out. 

By changing the numbering of Section 2780. so that said section shall 
be known as Section 2782. 

By changing the numbering of Section 2787, so that said section shall 
be known as Section 2783. 

By changing the numbering of Section 2788. so that said section shall 
be known as Section 2784. 

By changing the numbering of Section 2789. so that said section shall 
be known as Section 2785. 

By changing the numbering of Section 2790, so that said section shall 
be known as Section 2780. 

By changing the numbering of Section 2791, so that said section shall 
be known as Section 2787. 

By changing the numbering of Section 2792, so that said section shall 
be known as Section 2788. 

By changing the numbering of Section 279-3, so that said section shall 
be known as Section 2789. 

By changing the numbering of Section 2794, so that said section shall 
be known as Section 2790. 

By changing the numbering of Section 2795, and by striking out, the 
numbering of Section 2790 and Section 2798, and by including all of said 
sections in one section, to be known as Section 2797; so that said sec- 
tions of said Chapter, when amended, shall read as follows: 

Section 2779. The jurisdiction of the City Court of Charleston shall 
be limited to the trial of causes arising under the ordinances of the City 
Council of Charleston. 

Section 2780. All issues, controversies and litigations in the said Court, 
if demanded by either party, shall be tried by a jury composed of six 
persons, according to the regulations and forms prescribed by law in 
cases of trial by jury, and as hereinafter provided. 

Section 2781. The Clerk of the City Court, the City Treasurer and the 
City Assessor shall constitute the Board of Jury Commissioners for the 
City Court of Charleston; Provided, In case any member of the 
Board of Jury Commissioners fail to attend for the purpose of drawing 
a jury, a majority of the Board may act. The City Sheriff shall, upon 
the passage of this Act, and hereafter on the 1st day of January of each 
year, provide a list of twenty-five hundred legally qualified jurors, from 
which list the Board of Jury Commissioners shall cause the names to 
be written, each on a separate paper or ballot, and shall fold up said 
pieces of paper or ballots so as to resemble each other as much as 
possible, so that the names written thereon shall not be visible on the 



•jih; Mayor Smyth's Annual Review. 

outside, mid shall place them with the said lisl in a box to be furnished 
to them by the ( 'ii> < 'ouneil of ( 'harleston, w Inch box shall be in custody 
of the Clerk of Court. The jury box shall be provided with three locks. 
each different. The kej to one lock shall be kepi by the Clerk of the 
City Court, one by the City Treasurer and one by the < ii \ Assessor, 
so thai no two of said Commissioners shall hold keys to the same lock. 
When jurors are to be drawn, the Board of .Inrv Commissioners shall 
attend at the office of the Clerk of the City Court, and in the presence 
of the Sheriff shall shake up the names of the jury box until they are 
well mixed, and having unlocked said box, the Board of Jury Commis- 
sioners, or a majority of I hem. shall proceed to draw t hereform, without 
seeing the names written thereon, a number of ballots equal to the 
number of jurors required, and which jury shall be summoned for the 
trial of causes in like manner and under the same penalties as are 
established by law and usage in the Circuit Court; Provided, That no 
"venire facias" shall at any time issue for more than eighteen jurors to 
serve at one Court . from whom a jury (or two juries, if the Recorder 
shall regard more than one jury necessary for the proper dispatch of the 
business before the Court.) shall be empanelled; and in case of non- 
attendance of the jurors so drawn and summoned, their places may be 
supplied by talesmen, drawn in the usual mode: but no person shall 
be liable to serve twice until all the names in the said jury box shall 
be drawn out. 

Section 2782. All persons possessing the qualifications prescribed for 
jurors by the laws of the State, and usually residing in the city, or who 
have resided therein for four months before their being sworn, and there 
being at the time of being drawn and summoned, shall be liable to serve 
as jurors in the said Court, saving and reserving to all persons all lawful 
excuse mid exemptions as in other Courts. 

Section 2783. It shall be lawful for the City Council and the said 
Recorder to prescribe, and from time to time to regulate, the practice 
of the said Court, and of the attorneys therein, cornformably to this 
Chapter, and as nearly as may be to the forms and rules used in the 
Circuit Courts of this State, and the proceedings shall be the same 
substantially as in like cases; except in cases for the violation of ordi- 
nances, \vhen imprisonment is imposed in addition to or in the alternative 
of a fine, in which ease the prosecution shall be in the form of an infor- 
mation on the official oath of the Corporation Counsel. 

Section 2784. All writs and processes shall be issued by the Clerk of 
the said Court, and shall be made returnable to the first day of the term 
nexl suceeding the issuing of the same. 

Section 2785. The said Court is invested with power ana authority to 
-rani vnles. to hear and determine motions for new trial, in arrest of 
judgment, and all questions of law arising out of causes within its 
jurisdiction; to issue subpoenas for the attendance of witnesses, to 
grant commissions for the examination of witnesses, to issue executions 



Acts -Relating to the City of Charleston, 1903. 



0( 



17 



of "fieri facias" against the real and personal property of detenaants. to 
issue writs of "Capias ad respondendum." to punish for contempt, and 
also all other the usual process, according to the known and approved 
rules of the common law and of the Acts of the Assembly in such cases 
prvided; the Eecorder shall have the same powers in the ctiscnaxge of 
his duties as the Judges of the Court of Sessions and Common Pleas in 
like cases; but it is hereby declared and provided that no process- or writ 
issuing out of the said Court shall extend or be of force for service or 
execution out of the limits of the said city, except commissions to 
examine witnesses; and all writs shall be served and returned ten days 
before the sitting of the Court aforesaid. 

Section 2786. All parties shall have the same right of appeal to the 
Supreme Court from the decisions of the said City Court, In tne same 
form which is now or may be lawful for parties in the Circuit Courts 
in like cases, and the Supreme Court shall hear and determine such 
appeals in the same manner as appeals from the Ciucuit uourt of 
Charleston County. 

Section 2787. All judgments in the office of the Clerk of the said City 
Court, and all executions, writs and processes in the office of the Sheriff 
of the city of Charleston, other than judgments, executions and pro- 
cesses arising under the ordinances of the City Council of Charleston, 
shall be transferred, respectively, to the offices of the Clerk of the 
Circuit Court and of the Sheriff of the County of Charleston, which 
causes, judgments, executions, writs and processes shall De of like 
validity and force as if the same had originated or been sued out of 
the Circuit Court for the said County. 

Section 2788. The Clerk and Sheriff of the said City Court of Charles- 
ton shall have the same powers and authority in all cases within the 
jurisdiction of the said Court as the Clerks and Sheriffs of the Circuit 
Courts. 

Section 2789. In case of the sickness or absence from the State of the 
Recorder, they shall have power, and are hereby authorized and required 
to draw juries for the succeeding term. 

Section 2790. The charges and fees of the several officers of the City 
Court shall be the same as in the Circuit Court in like cases. 

Section 2791. There shall be established a Court in the city of Charles- 
ton known as the Police Court of the city of Charleston, which shall be 
held by the Recorder of the city of Charleston. The said Recorder, and 
any Magistrate holding the Police Court of the city of Charleston in the 
case of absence, sickness or other disability of such Recorder, is invested 
with jurisdiction to hear and determine all cases of a criminal nature 
occurring within the limits of the city of Charleston, which are not 
within the exclusive jurisdiction of the Court of General Sessions; that 
is to say, any such officer holding the Police Court shall have juris- 
diction of all offenses committed within the limits of the city of Charles- 
ton on arrest by the police or municipal authorities, wdiich may be 



298 '/ ujor Snmth's Animal Review 



■mbjeel in i li»' penalties of line or forfeiture not exceeding one hundred 
dollars, or imprisonment, with or without hard labor, noi exceeding 
thirty days, and may impose am sentence within these limits singly 
or in t he alterna tive. 

Section 2702, Upon the sworn information of any member of the police 
force or municipal officer, any such officer holding the said Police I our! 
as aforesaid, shall proceed to the examination of any charge againsl any 
person arrested and broughf before him, and upon the same appearing 
noi to be within the jurisdiction of the said Police Conn, he shall refer 
the same to a Ministerial Magistrate as such for examination, to be by 
such Ministerial Magistrate referred to the Judicial Magistrate's Courl 
of the city of ( harleston, jr Court of General Sessions, ns may be 
proper. 

Section - _!7'.»-">. Upon a in charge made as above againsf any person 
released on deposit and not appearing when called, any such officer hold- 
in- the said Police Court shall order the said deposits forfeited. 

Seed ion ii7'.U. In the trial of any case in the said Police Uourt, upon 
the demand for a jury, the same shall be summoned and empanelled in 
l he -aid Police Court, in accordance with the law for empanelling juries 
in Magist rate-' ( 'ourt s. 

Section 2795. In taking of testimony and preparation of the record in 
cases of appeal from the said Police Court, the transcript of the notes 
of the testimony taken of the dial by a sworn steiujgrapner stiall be 
held to he equivalent to the testimony signed by the witnesses, and the 
Recorder is hereby authorized and empowered to appoint a suitable 
person as official stenographer of said Police Court, who, after being 
duly sworn, shall take all testimony before said Police Court. 

Section 279G. It shall be the duty of one of the officers of the police 
force to be in constant attendance on said Court, and to take proper 
measures for the safe keeping of the prisoners and for carrying into 
effect the orders of said Court. 

Section 2797. The said Recorder shall not be permitted to plead in a 
superior Court in any cause which has been argued before or adjudged 
by him. The Recorder is hereby clothed with all the powers, duties and 
jurisdiction of a Judicial Magistrate, except that he shall not receive 
any additional compensation, and shall not have the authority of a 
Magistrate to appoint a Constable. In case of the sickness or other 
unavoidable absence of the Recorder, the Police Court shall t>e held by 
one of the Aldermen of the city of Charleston, or by one of the Magis- 
trates for (harleston County, as may be designated by the Mayoi. 

This Act shall take effect immediately upon its approval by the 
< lovernor. 

Approved the 2d day of March. A. I). 1903. 



Acts Relating to the City of Charleston, 1903. 299 

AN ACT to Refund, Repay and Return Certain Taxes to "The Protestant 
Episcopal Church of the Parish of St. Philip, in Charleston, in the 
State of South Carolina." 

Whereas, the parsonage of "The Protestant Episcopal Church of the 
Parish of St. Philip, in Charleston, in the State of South Carolina," (a 
body politic and corporate by virute of and under an Act of the Gen- 
eral Assembly of the State of South Carolina, ratified 20th December, 
1791), was erroneously assessed for taxation in the year 1898, and there- 
upon taxes were charged and levied on the said parsonage for the fiscal 
year 1898, and thereafter for the fiscal years 1899, 1900 and 19U1, and the 
said church was required to pay and did pay all of the said taxes; And 
whereas.the Supreme Court of the State in March, 1902, decided that the 
said parsonage is exempt from taxation, and that the County Auditor 
of Charleston County must correct the tax duplicate by striking there- 
from the assessment of the said parsonage (see the case entitled "The 
Protestant Episcopal Church of the Parish of St. Philip v. Prioleau, as 
County Auditor," and reported at pages 70. 71. 72 and 73 of the 63d 
volume of South Carolina Reports), wherefore and whereupon the said 
taxes for the fiscal year 1901 were refunded, repaid and returned to the 
said church by the County Treasurer of Charleston County tin#er and by 
the direction of the Comptroller General of the State on a petition to 
him, the said Comptroller General, by the said church; and whereas, the 
said taxes for the fiscal years 1898, 1899 and 1900, cannot oe refunded, 
repaid and returned except under and by the direction of. an .act of the 
General Assembly of the State; now, therefore. 

Section 1. Be it enacted by the General Assembly of the State of 
South Carolina, That the State Treasurer be, and he is hereby, author- 
ized and directed to refund, repay and return to the said "The Protestant 
Episcopal Church of the Parish of St. Philip, in Charleston, in the State 
of South Carolina," the sum of fifty-two dollars and fifty cents ($52.50), 
the same being the amount of the State's portion of the said taxes for 
the fiscal years 1898, 1899 and 1900, out of any funds in the State 
Treasury not otherwise appropriated, and to take the receipt of the 
Treasurer of the said church therefor, which said receipt shall be the 
proper and sufficient voucher of the State Treasurer for the same. 

Sec. 2. That the County Treasurer of Charleston County be, and he is 
hereby, authorized and directed to refund, repay and return to the said 
church the sum of twenty-seven dollars and twelve cenls ($27.12), the 
same being the amount of the County's portion of the said taxes for the 
fiscal years 1898, 1899 and 1900, out of the general County fund of the 
said County, and also the sum of thirty-one dollars and fifty cents 
($31.50), the same being the amount of the School portion of said taxes 
for the fiscal years 1898, 1899 and 1900, out of the general school fund 
of the said County; and to take the receipts of the Treasurer of the said 
church therefor, which said receipts shall be proper and sufficient 
vouchers of the said County Treasurer for the same. 



000 Mayor Smyth's Annual Reoiew. 

See. ;;. Thai the City Treasurer of the City of Charleston be, and tie 
ts liereby, authorized and directed \>> refund, repay and return to the 
said church the. sum of fourteen dollars ($14.00), the same being the 
amount of the special school tax levied and collected by him from the 
said church on its said parsonage, under the authority of the Act to raise 
supplies and make appropriations for each of the fiscal years L898, 1899, 

1 !><X) and IDOL out of any such special school tax fund now or hereafter 
in his hands. 

Approved the 0th day of February, A. I). 1003. 



APPKNDIX. 



In Memoriam—Dr. E. Barnwell Rhett. 



OFFICIAL ACTION OF CITY COUNCIL ON DEATH OF 
DR. R. B. RHETT. 



IN MEMORIAM. 

DR. R. BARNWELL RHETT. 

Proceedings of Council, Council Chamber. 

Regular Meeting, August 13, 1001. 

The fortieth meeting of Council was called this day at 1 P. M. 

Present — Hon. J. Adger Smyth, Mayor; Aldermen Williams, O'Neill, 
Rhett, Frost, Wilson, Roddy. Lapham, Masters, Gadsden, Rafferty, 
Cramer, Johnson. Galvin, Kollock, Hanckel, Melchers, Riley, Petit, 
Poppen, Legare, Hanley, Buck, Mathies — 24. 

The minutes of the previous meeting were read and confirmed. 

The Mayor said: "Again it is my sorrowful duty to announce the 
sudden death of Dr. Robert Barnwell Rhett, Jr., one of the Board of 
Sewerage Commissioners, and also one of the Trustees of the Shirras 
Dispensary. 

"When the old oak. under the shade of whose branches our fathers 
have often rested, and we have played in childhood's happy days, slowly 
decays and falls to the earth we mourn its loss, but are consoled by the 
thought that it has fulfilled the purpose of its creation. 

"When the young and growing tree, planted, perhaps, with our youth- 
ful hands, full of promise of long life and increasing usefulness, 
stricken by the lightning blast or the howling storm, lies shattered on 
the ground our hearts are stunned by the sudden and unexpected devas- 
tation, and we sit silent and broken-hearted around the wreck of our 
hopes. 

So it was last Wednesday night, when from lip to lip, with bated 
breath, the startling announcement was made, 'Dr. Rhett is dead.' As 
the news sped on there were few households in this city where s idness 
did not reign; few hearts that were not filled with grief; few eyes that 
did not overflow with tears. The entire community was in mourning 
and sincere and heartfelt words of sorrow were on every tongue. 

"It seemed so hard to understand why such a life of self-sacrificing 
devotion to the sorrowing and the suffering sons and daughters of hu- 
manity should be so suddenly ended, while thre was such need of his 
loving services and so many helpless ones dependent upon his care and 
ministrations. 

"And yet, his life was not a broken or imperfect one. It was full- 
orbed and beautifully rounded. No broken column, no imperfect shaft, 
can appropriately mark his resting place. Few men have ever lived who 
have done so much for their fellow men in so short a space of time. 



I Mayor Smyth's Annual Review. 

"No one can live a nobler, higher, purer life than to walk with the 
Divine Master, whose loving joy it was when on earth to go aboul doing 
good, healing the sick, alleviating pain and suffering and helping and 
comforting pour, sorrow stricken hearts. 

"So our friend, the beloved* physician, in his sphere followed in the 
footsteps of the God Man and lived 'even as the Son of Man came, not to 
be ministered unto, bul to minister and to give his life a ransom for 
many.' 

"And so Dr. Rhett's life, though brief in years, was complete. He had 
finished his work; he was faithful unto (he end. lie proved I he truth of 
t lie poet 's wolds: 

'We live in deeds, not years: in thoughts; not breaths; 
In service, not in figures on a dial; 

\\ e should count 1 inie by heart -1 hrobs. 

He most lives 

Who thinks most, feels the noblest, acts the best.' 

•\\o wonder a sorrow st 1 icken con mity desire to perpel uate the name 

a in! record their loving gratitude to this 'beloved physician.' It would be 
most appropriate tor this Council, in fitting term-, to express our appre- 
ciation of his life and our sorrow at his death." 

Alderman I fanckel said : 

Mr. Mayor and Members of City Council— There are times in the life 
of a community when events happen that may cause those who are the 
representatives of the people to feel that through them the wishes of 
the community should he expressed officially, so that future generations 
may know how those events affected them at that time. 

Such an event, a truly sad one. happened in our midst a few short days 
ago, the death of Dr. Robert Barnwell Rhett, Jr., of whom, Mr. Mayor, 
you have just so appropriately and feelingly spoken; hence it seems only 
fitting that we, the city's representatives, should officially record the 
greal loss our community has sustained — so touchingly expressed by 
that out pouring" of all classes and conditions of our people on last 
Friday afternoon at yonder church, where seemingly the whole city 
gathered to pay their last sad tribute to this saintly man, friend and 
benefactor, every one of whom had doubtless felt the spell of his per- 
sonality and witnessed his unselfish devotion to his great profession — 
the alleviation of the bodily sufferings of humanity. Therefore, be it 

Resolved, That a committee of three be appointed to prepare appro- 
priate resolutions in memory of the late Dr. Robert Barnwell Rhett, Jr., 
to be spread upon the minutes of this Council and published in the Year 
Book, and also to report mhiio suitable form of memorial to be estab- 
lished by the city. 

Unanimously adopted by a rising vote. 

The Mayor appointed the following committee: Aldermen Hanckel, 
Riley and Kollock. 



In Mcmoriam — Dr. R. Barnwell Rhett. 



REPORTS OF COMMITTEES. 

Your Ways and Means Committee would present the following report: 
With reference to the R. Barnwell Rhett, Jr., M. D., Memorial, would 
report that in accordance with the resolution of City Council, the Com- 
missioners of the City Hospital were supplied with the funds necessary 
to erect a suitable operating room in the City Hospital to the memory of 
Dr. Rhett. That they requested the Special Committee of Council who 
recommended this memorial to supply such a tablet as would comply 
with their report. The Special Committee has submitted a form of 
tablet, which is attached hereto, and we would recommend that Council 
adopt the following resolution: 

Whereas, A Special Committee was appointed by City Council to 
report to it what would be a suitable memorial for the late Dr. R. B. 
Rhett, Jr., and 

Whereas, On the 8th day of October, 1901, this Special Committee 
reported as follows: 

"That in testimony thereof the City Council hereby authorized the 
Ways and Means Committee to provide, in such manner as in their judg- 
ment may deem best, for the building and equipping of a modern, up-to- 
date operating room at the City Hospital, and that the same shall be 
known as the Dr. Robert Barnwell Rhett, Jr., Operating Room of the 
City Hospital of Charleston, S. C, and that a tablet suitably inscribed 
be erected in this operating room to the memory of Dr. Rhett," and 

Whereas, This memorial operating room has been completed and a 
form of tablet has been presented by the Special Committee above re- 
ferred to, now 

Be it resolved, That the form of tablet, as attached to this report, be 
adopted as suitable in the judgment of this Council, and 

Be it resolved, further, That the Mayor have the said tablet prepared 
and delivered to the Commissioners of the City Hospital for its erection 
in the said Memorial Operatng Room. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 

R. G. RHETT, 

SAMUEL LAPHAM, 

F. Q. O'NEILL, 

GEO. W. WILLIAMS, JR., 

JAMES R. JOHNSON, 

A. F. C. CRAMER, 

J. ADGER SMYTH, Mayor. 

Charleston, S. C, October 27, 1902. 
Hon. J. Adger Smyth, Mayor. 

Dear Sir — In answer to yours of the 14th and 23d instants, we beg to 
hand you herewith a design for a tablet, and a suitable inscription there- 
A 



Mayor SmytJis Annual Review. 



for, to !»«• placed in the operating km, f the City Hospital, Charleston 

S. ('., erected to i he memon of Dr. Roberl Barnwell Rhett, Jr. 
\ ours, \ ei \ respecl t nll\ . 

F. s. HANCKEL, 

in \kkks w . kollock, 

A. I. RILEY. 
Special Committee Illicit Memorial. 

The report and recommendation of the Ways and Means Committe< 
was unanimously adopted. 

The following i> the inscription: 

DR. ROBERT BARNWELL RHETT, .IK.. 

OPERATING ROOM 

Of the City Hospital of Charleston, S. C. 

faceted by the City of Charleston. 

IX MEMORY OK 

ROBERT BARNWELL RHETT, JR., M. D. 

Beloved Physician— Eminent Surgeon. 

PHILANTHROPIST. 

Born October 17. KS;)4— Died August 7. 11)01. 

October, 1902. 



/// Mem or lam — Dr. H. B. Horlbeck. 



OFFICIAL ACTION OF CITY COUNCIL ON DEATH OF 
DR. H. B. HORLBECK. 



IN MEMORIAM. 

DR. H. B. HORLBECK. 

Health Officek. 



Proceedings of Council, Council Chamber, 

Regular Meeting, October 28, 1901. 

The sixty-eighth meeting of Council was called this day at 7 P. M. 

Present — Hon. J. Adger Smyth, Mayor; Aldermen Williams, O'Neill, 
Bhett, Frost, Roddy, Lapham, Masters, Gadsden, Rafferty, Cramer, 
Johnson, Holmes, Garvin, Kollock, Hanckel, Melchers, Riley, Petit, 
Poppen, Legare, Hanley, Bischoff and Stoffer — 24. 

The Mayor said: 

It is my sad duty to announce to you officially the death of our health 
officer, Dr. Henry Buckingham Horlbeck, which took place on the morn- 
ing of the 2d of August, 1901. 

For over twenty years he has served this city as its health officer 
with unswerving fidelity and distinguished ability. He was stricken 
down with the disease which ended his life in the actual performance of 
his official duties, while personally examining the condition of the city 
pest house, which had been made habitable and useful largely by his con- 
stant and earnest statements of the pressing need to the city of such an 
asylum. 

A fitting end to a life devoted to the welfare of his native city and his 
fellow men. 

A gallant and patriotic soldier in war, a loyal and devoted citizen in 
peace, an able scientist, an accomplished gentleman, a faithful friend. 
Peace to his ashes. 

Alderman Kollock then arose and in feeling terms paid a very grace- 
ful and touching tribute to the memory of Dr. H. B. Horlbeck, who Had 
served the city so long and faithfully. He offered the following resolu- 
tions : 

1. Resolved, That in the death of Dr. Henry B. Horlbeck the city of 
Charleston has lost an accomplished and highly educated gentleman and 
most efficient, faithful and meritorious officer; the conservators of health 
an intelligent and ardent worker, who stood high in the national councils 
of public health and whose opinions were largely sought in all matters 
pertaining to sanitation and quarantine. 

2. That his office in the City Hall be draped in mourning for one month. 

3. That these resolutions be printed in the daily papers. 
Unanimously adopted by a rising vote. 



8 Mayor Smyth's Annual Review. 

Uderman Kollock then addressed Council as follows: 
Mr. Mayor and Gentlemen of Council When a man has served con 
tinually in one position for twenty years, whom by his intelligence and 
judgment has raised thai office from one of comparative insignificance 
to a position second to none in the city, who on account of his wise 
administrtion and progressive spirit, he is recognized throughout the 
country as an authority in his work and Ids opinion is eagerly sought 
by his conferees, he should be honored at home as well as abroad. 
When such a man 'ays down his burden and goes to Ids long rest. his 
work. Ids life, and his example should not be forgotten, but should be 
perpetuated in some form for the generations to come. Around us we 
see the portraits of many men whose examples and works it nas served 
good to keep green in our memories. There stands George Washington, 
of whose deeds every school boy knows, and who, though dead more 
than a hundred years, can never be forgotten. And there is "Old 
Hickory," the hero of the battle of New Orleans, and the ragged and 
honest statesman. There is John ( '. Calhoun, the greatest statesman of 
South Carolina, and a man whose character was as pure as the driven 
snow ; and there is Beauregard, the defender of Charleston, while near him 
hangs the portrait of gallant Tom Huguenin, the boy commander of Fort 
Sumter, and afterwards one of the city's trusted servants. Behind me 
hangs the picture of William A. Courtenay, Mayor of Charleston for 
eight years, than whom no man has done more for her good nor wishes 
better for her future. In front of me is the picture of the greatest and 
grandest man South Carolina has ever produced — Gen. Wade Hampton. 
All love him and none can forget him, and so Mr. Mayor and gentlemen 
of Council, this hall contains treasures that can not be replaced and 
history for the coming generations. It is my pleasure to present, for a 
number of his friends, a picture of another of Charleston's most faithful 
sons and servants. I refer to the late Henry B. Horlbeck, M. D., Health 
Officer of this city from 1S81 to 1901. It is not necessary to speak of his 
work and his faithfulness to this city where he was born and educated, 
which he helped to defend during the war between the States and to 
which he gave the best days of his life. In harness and with his face to 
the foe, he died, for while making his daily visit to the pest house, 
during the time when there were a few cases of smallpox here, he was 
stricken with paralysis and never recovered. To your custody, sir, I give 
this picture, and beg that, like those above me, it may serve to make us 
and our children respect and venerate the great men who have lived 
before us. 

The Mayor thanked Alderman Kollock and his friends who had so 
generously presented this portrait of one who had served his native city 
so faithfully and well, and assured him that it would give the Council 
pleasure to have the portrait hung in the City Council Chamoer among 
those other distinguished citizens whom Charleston delighted to honor, 
and that the portrait would be placed in the hands of the Committee on 
City Hall Clock and Chimes, to be assigned a proper place. 
(Published by request.) 



Flag Presentation by Alderman C. W. Kollock. 



OFFICIAL ACTION OF CITY COUNCIL 

Upon Receiving the Flag of Steamers Chicora and Palmetto, Presented 
by General W. W. H. Davis, Through Mayor Pro Tern C. W. Kollock, 
at Philadelphia, June, 1901. 

Alderman Kollock then said: 

"Mr. Mayor — At the recent meeting of the Southern Industrial Associa- 
tion, which was held in Philadelphia, I had, through your courtesy, the 
honor to represent the city of Charleston. This meeting was composed 
of men from every portion of the South, men of standing in their com- 
munities, and who not only had the best interests of their towns and 
States at heart, but were justly enthusiastic over the mighty strides 
which the Southern country has made during the last thirty years. As 
the names of the States were called there were many who were eager 
and anxious to speak in glowing terms of the advantages of their own 
States, and the true spirit of patriotism which pervaded these speeches 
proved how great was the love of country among these earnest men. To 
give an accurate account of this wonderful meeting would consume more 
time and space than is alloted for such reports and, besides, the news- 
papers contained full accounts of the proceedings. I can only say that I 
was astonished and pleased beyond expression by the reports from many 
States and cities whose progress has ben phenomenal, but it is a matter 
of profound regret that the representatives appointed by the Governor 
of South Carolina failed to attend and no one was present to speak of 
her wonderful soil, varied resources and agricultural and mineral pro- 
ducts. The Hon. John F. Ficken and Messrs. J. M. Seignious and J. C. 
Hemphill ably set forth the advantages of Charleston and the Exposition 
in strong addresses. The good people of Philadelphia did everything in 
their power to make the occasion one of pleasure and profit to the 
visitors by planning excursions to pleasure resorts, to Cramp's shipyards, 
Baldwin's locomotive works, and many other places which were both 
interesting and instructive. During the time of this meeting the bill to 
appropriate $35,000 for the building and exhibit at the South Carolina 
and West Indian Exposition was passed by the Philadelphia City Coun- 
cil and it was also decided to send the old Liberty Bell to the Exposition. 
These and one other incident prove more than honeyed words that a 
true feeling of friendship is once more binding the people of the North 
and South together in bonds that cannot be broken. 

In the latter part of the year 1862 two ironclad steam rams were built 
in Charleston. They were called the Palmetto and Chicora. The former 
was the flag ship of Commodore Duncan N. Ingraham and was com- 
manded by Lieutenant Commander John Rutledge. The latter was com- 
manded by Capt. John P. Tucker, of Virginia. On the 31st of January, 



M> Mayor Smyth's Annual Review. 

1863, these boats attacked the Federal Heel off Sumter and caused the 
Uercidita and Keystone State to haul down their colors, luit they both 
escaped before they could be boarded l>y the Confederates, as the rams 
were \ci\ slow on accounl hi defective engines. The entire fleel of ten 
vessels was. however, dispersed for some hours and ii was claimed thai 
the blockade was raised. On February IS, 1865, when the Federal troops 
entered Charleston, after its evacuation by the Confederates, they took 
possession, among other things, of the Chicora, and from her was taken 
by Lieut. Elliott, of t'he 114th Pennsylvania regiment, a signal (lag. This 
1 1 : i «4 was presented by him to the colonel of this regiment, \V. \Y. il. 
Davis, (afterwards general). 

Thirty-six years have passed since those eventful days and time, which 
changes everything, lias softened the hearts of many who were enemies 
then and made them friends now. The gallanl captor wished to return 
this flag to those from whom it came, and, hearing that the meeting of 
the Southern Industrial Association was to he held in Philadelphia in 
dune, and that representatives from Charleston would be present, he 
decided that this would he an auspicious occasion for returning the flag 
to the city of Charleston. Through the courtesy of the president of the 
Association this privilege was granted and to me fell the honor of 
receiving it. As Mayor of Charleston, 1 place it in your custody after 
an absence of thirty-six years from its home, during which time it has 
been faithfully preserved by one who was an enemy, but is now a friend. 
Once more it has been unfurled to the breeze to signal — not that the fleet 
which threatened our city and State should be dispersed as before — but 
in the hands of its gallant captor and keeper to signal from the North 
to the South that the war is over for all time, that good feeling once 
more prevails between the two, that their interests are ours and that 
henceforth we will be one people. And now, sir, let us flurl this old flag 
and place it where our sons and daughters and theirs rnar see and 
revere it, near the sword of the great Beauregard and those of the gal- 
lant Mitchel and Chichester and the tattered Hag of Sumter." 

The Mayor, in receiving the flag, said: 

"It is my pleasant duty. Mayor Pro Tem Kollock, to thank you on 
behalf of the city of Charleston for the very happy and appropriate 
manner in which you represented us at the Southern Industrial Conven- 
tion in Philadelphia last month, and especially for your eloquent re- 
sponse when receiving the Confederate flag belonging to the Confederate 
steamer Chicora, presented to this city by Col. \V. W. H. Davis, of 
Doylstown, Pa. 

"We receive from you this flag reverently and with loving hands 
place it in solemn keeping. There need be no words to emphasize the 
simple eloquence that touches our hearts to-day in silent but soul- 
stirring appeal at the sight of this sacred relic. As we look upon its 
battle-scarred folds our hearts overflow with precious memories and our 
eyes are filled with tears as we remember the bravery, trie devotion, and 
the self-sacrifice of so many noble women and gallant men during those 



Flag Presentation by Alderman C. W. Kolloch 1 1 

four long, bloody, weary years — a devotion and self-sacrifice that has 
never been excelled in all the ages of the past. 

"This Hag, however, represents more to us to-day than this precious 
past, with all its priceless memories. It tells us also of the present, 
with all its glorious and joyful possibilites. 

"It was most fitting that in the City of Brotherly Love, at a gathering 
of representative Americans, from such widely separated sections of this 
great republic, this Confederate flag, with all that it typifies to us and to 
them, should be so generously returned to this city, the cradle of seces- 
sion, by one who fought against that flag as bravely as we fought (o 
defend it. Most convincing proof that we are now one country! Most 
fitting token that former foes are brothers again! We accep this flag and 
the hand that offers it in the same kindly spirit in which it was given. 
I trust this City Council will duly acknowledge this courteous and 
brotherly gift." 

Alderman Melchers said: 

"Incidents like this are tokens of the good will and brotherly lov? 
which now again prevail over this broad land of ours; they are move 
eloquent and speak more direct to the heart than all orations or new- 
paper articles can accomplish. This token of good will, coming from the 
City of Brotherly Love, and from one who has fought bravely for the 
cause he thought right, is especially gratifying and a proof that we are 
again one united people and one great country, bound together by com- 
mon interest and the cement of brotherly love. The younger generation 
cannot appreciate the feeling and the throbbing of the heart: which over- 
comes the old veteran when he looks upon a torn and tattered flag like 
this -the symbol of the cause for which he fought and . struggled four 
long years; the most gigantic struggle the world has ever seen, and 
may God grant that the world will never see • such a struggle again. 
United we are the greatest nation upon the face of the world. Much has 
been accomplished during the last century and the spirit m which this 
battle-scarred flag has been returned to us, the spirit of brotherly love 
and good will, which now prevails all over the United- States will enable 
us to make this the greatest and best country the world has ever seen. 
.1 therefore beg to offer the following resolutions : 

"Resolved, by the City Council, duly assem'bled , That the heartfelt 
thanks of the city of Charleston are hereby tendered to Col. W. W. H. 
Davis, of Doylestown, Pa., for his generous and patriotic action in re- 
turning to us the flag of the Confederate steamer Chicora, captured by 
him at the evacuation of this city in 1865. 

"Hesolved, That a copy of the remarks of the Mayor and the Mayor 
pro tern and of this action of City Council, duly certified, be forwarded 
to Col. Davis." 

The resolutions were unanimously adopted. 
On motion, Council then adjourned. 

W. W. SIMONS, Clerk of Council. 
(Published by request.) 



1 _' Mayor Smyth's Annual lieview 



OFFICIAL ACTION OF CITY COUNCIL ON DEATH OF 
BERNARD O'NEILL AND GEO. W. WILLIAMS. 



IN MEMORIAM. 

HON. BERNARD O'NEILL AND HON. GEO. VV. WILLIAMS. 

Proceedings of Council, Council Chamber, 

Regular .Merlin-, January 13, 1!)0:5. 

The seventy-third meting of Council was called this day at 7 P. M. 

Present Hon. J. Adger Smyth, Mayor: Aldermen William-. O'Neill. 
Rhett, Frost, Roddy, Lapham, Masters, Gadsden, Rafferty, Cramer, John- 
son, Holmes, Galvin, Kollock, Hanckel, Melchers, Riley, Petit, Poppen, 
Legare, Hanley, Bischoff, and Storfer 24. 

The minutes of the previous meeting were read and confirmed. 

The Mayor said: 

Gentlemen of City Council Since our last meeting two of our most 
venerable and highly esteemed citizens, after long and useful lives, 
largely spent in the service of this city, lane passed from us into that 
unknown country, across the Dark river. 

In obedience to that universal instinct that leads men in all ages to 
reverence those whom death has taken away, it is proper to offer to 
their memories this tribute of affection and esteem. 

Both of them had been Aldermen, members of this City Council, both 
of them chairmen of important boards of commissioners miner the con- 
trol of this honorable body .and both of them presidents ol important 
and flourishing banks. 

Mr. Bernard O'Neill selected Charleston for his adopted home in 1S42. 
for sixty years, by his commercial probity, ami unwavering honesty, he 
illustrated the distinctive chaacteristics of the Charleston merchant, 
whose woid was always as good as his bond. Great as was his executive 
ability, his integrity in business matters and in public life was even 
greater and marked the very best type of true manhood. 

He was a devoted son of this old city, both in peace and in war, serv- 
ing as an Alderman uunder Gen. John A. Wagener, and being chairman 
of the hoard of Commissioners of the City Hospital and chairman of the 
Board of Health for many years. 

He died quietly and peacefully on December 29, 1902, in the 80th year 
of his age. 

Mr. George W. Williams came to Charleston in 1852, and entering at 
i nire upon a mercantile career, from that time until the very night of his 
death took always an active part in everything that concerned the best 
interest of this city. Taking at an early age his rightful place in the 



In Memoriam — Bernard O'Neill and Geo. W.Williams. 13 

front rank of her merchants, he was ever one of her most loyai sons. 
Under Mayor Charles Macbeth he was an Alderman and chairman of the 
Committee on Ways and Means. For many years, and until his death, 
he was the active efficient chairman of the Board of Commissioners of 
the Charleston Orphan House. 

Connected with almost every great enterprise that promised to ad- 
vance the public welfare, he impressed upon this community and the 
young' men especially the life lessons of thrift, energy and honesty as 
illustrated by the success and fortune that crowned his career. 

Several hours of the very last day of his life was spent at the City 
Hall with the City Treasurer, examining and verifying the financial 
affairs of the Orphan House for the year just ended, and affixing his sig- 
nature to these statements as the last official act of his long and useful 
life. 

He passed away in the early morn of January 6, 1903, in the 83d year 
of his age. 

Was it not strange that two such well known and highly esteemed 
citizens shouid have been taken from us within the one week? 

Active and energetic almost to the very last, long after many other 
men would have found ever the grasshopper a burden, grown weary and 
yielded up the strife, the summons of duty always met from them a 
ready response, until the despondent and faint-hearted took courage 
again at the sight of these two grand old men continuing their life 
battles until the insatiate Archer claimed them for his own. 

"Of no distemper, of no blast, they died. 

But fell like autumn fruit that mellowed long; 
E'en wondered at because they dropped no sooner, 
Fate seemed to wind them up for four-score years, 
Yet slowly ran one on two winters more, 
Till like a clock, worn out with beating time, 
The wheels of weary life at last stood still." 

Alderman Hanckel moved that the remarks of the Mayor be endorsed 
as the sentiments of Council, and spread upon the minutes. Unani- 
mously adopted. 

(Published by request.) 



11 Mayor Smyth's Annual Review. 



A POEM 

Written in 1804, 

I A 

i:i)\\ ARD OTHMEL GALE BE \l.i: 

Describing 

A Trip I "]) I lie ( looper I!i\ er. 

Adieu to the gay Oitty of my Birth 

hCqual to any thy cize on earth. 

Twas in the month of March, the winds were high, 

Our stately bark with spreading wings did fly, 

Swill through the sea it cut the froth'y way 

And every heart on board was light and gay 

The distant town and all its towr'ing spires 

Fast from my Glim'ring sight it pale retires 

Oh, radiant citty burned in arms and arts 

Where reighn in peace old virtuous vet'ran hearts. 

Now I behold the mansion of a chief 
Who fought the toe ami gave our land relief. 
So o'er his head old time Ins frost has thrown 
And art and science claim him for their own. 
A num'rours progeny around him throng. 
Oh. may the root and branches flourish long. 

The citty's hounds now leave my ardent sight 
Yet now I think upon !:;•)• glorious fight 
Blest city who repelled the foe so long, 
Tho crouding on the in imbattle'd throng 
The first invador Moultrie, thou dis'd foil, 
Parker's attempt then prov'd a fruitless toil. 

Arbonthnot and Prevost then next arriv'd 
And every art and stratagem they try'd 
A six week's Siege had baffl'd all their might 
Had not one direful letter come to light. 
Alas, it fell, but twas in glorious arms 
Thy tender fair to added to its charms 

True as the nedle to the distant pole 

And bright as sunshine to a virtuous sole 

Firm as a rock they tend their Husband's wounci 

And shew with heart and not with words their bound 

Their father, brother, friend, and foe they heal 

And shew their hearts for all the opprest did feel. 



A Poem by Edward 0. G. Brale in 180 ^ 15 

Now mark the foe whose hearts were form'd of steel 

x4nd for their fellow mortals never feel 

Roy den unfeeling monster, for thou was such, 

Tis yet a name to good by far to much, 

Was it to serve thy King, unfeeling wretch, 

Or put thy vengeance to the ut'most stretch. 

Thy King is merciful, not proud, he's good, 
He'll nee' embrue his hands in human bloood. 
But thou, O, fiend of Hell, thou murdr'd Hayns, 
Say, say, unfeeling man, what was thy gains. 
He died a marter to his country's cause 
And you shall sink to earth without applause. 

Curst sacrifice it was unfeeling act, 

And he that sign'd the scroll must now feel ract 

But here my pen must stop; I can not paint 

My youthful heart within me feels quite faint 

Say, feeling nature, was it not too base 

To view a fellow mortal, face to face 

And take his life; a curse shall crown they head 

Black phantom's dire shall haunt thy sleepless bea 

A murder'd patriot's form shall on the fall 

And peace be silent to thy ardent call 

Such cruelty Retaliation woke 

And fix'd on Andre's neck the baneful yoke 

To glut thy rage to weel thy turbid pride 

A Father and a Youth were saerifie'd. 

I'll leave the strains of murder and of blood 

And seek more pleasing scenes now on the flood 

Come deep and thoughtful Muse thy aid now lend 

And with instruction sweet descrystion blend 

As living scenes around my eyes now float 

As whistling gails assail our volant boat, 

As distant prospects open to my eyes 

Enotion startles with new born surprise; 

Between sweet cooper's banks we ploughed our way, 

And all around us was fair and gay; 

The shelving banks and prattling streams arouna, 
With crabs and oysters in abundance crowd; 
The rolling porpose glisten in the beam, 
And whiteing in abundance dart the stream; 
There's scarce a fish that swims th' Atlantic main 
But here too fills the angler's netted seine. 



h; Mayor Smyth's Annual Review 



< ' pleasanl ri\ er for indusl ry made 
Here Prichard dwells where oaks and cypris shade 
'Twas thou who gave the stately Adams birth 
And Cross commanded who has shown his worth; 
(hi these red hanks the stoul live oak did grow 
Thai form'd Amarica's firm youthful bow, 
For when that land that murder'd their good chief 
Was stealing on us like mi arrant I I I 
With sleting arrow and with iron show'r 
This stopt her naval and her unjust pow'r 
Brave Truxtun in a Constellation shine 
Proclaiming to proud Prance th' dnsurgant's mine 
A glorious peace soon spread her wings around 
And prov'd Columbia was her favourite ground. 
Bold Coopers stream shall still my theme engage 
kike Anthony that bright and learned sage 

Whose name it bears and Ashley too the same. 
Who live in annals with his endless fame; 
These rivers sweep two beds but yet are joined. 
And meet each other/ with a circling mind. 
For summer's air fair Cooper is the best, 
For winter silence sister Ashley is blessed. 
The Broth'r adorns the east in bold array, 
And Sister twin from west pursues her way; 
Thus shall thy name, great statesman, live in these, 
kike thy characteristics, charm and please. 

Assailing onward, next attracts the eye 

An island named buzzard, 'tis not high; 

And yet these birds of prey in swarms there fly 

To pick the fiddler crawling on this bank. 

In want of food more bulky or more rank. 

Salt Marsh and Bulrush deck the neighboring shores. 

It shoots up fast through those soft swampy pores; 

There the lean horse and cow will often stray, 

And feed in plenty greatest part of day. 

Next comes the flood to whelm this marshy field. 

The beast then tries to move, their limbs are sealed 

Bogged to the waist, all struggles now are vain, 

With death they drink the briny surge amain. 

Soon as the ebb commences its gliding way, 

These birds are on the watch to seize their prey; 

Soon as the tide has left these mud banks dry, 

They then in hundreds nay in thousands fly, 

Pecking the drowned beast in every part, 

Tearing its intrals and devouring the heart, 



A Poem by Edward 0. G. Br ale in 180 4.. 17 

Nor will they leave the beast, but gorge still on, 
Until the approaching flood there drives them from, 
Then crabs and shrimps come in for second course, 
And fish perhaps assails with tugging force. 

But now we approach a spot more fair and gay, 

That's decked with all the budding sweets of May; 

Tis Holmes' Isle where , Golden Orbs hang high, 

And case a fragrance to our Bark when nigh; 

Red Nectrine's Peaches, and sweet Apples bloom 

With Roses of all kinds the air perfume; 

Arbours with creeping I'vy over run, 

And plums and grapes" hang glittering in the sun; ; 

The flowering almond and pomegranate bloom, 

The evening primrose open to the moon; 

Sweet peas and beans on canes ascending high, 

And ripening corn in tassel waving nigh; 

Its earth o'erspiead with pumpkin's golden food. 

And watermelons red as human blood; 

The fig tree spreads its shady leaves around. 

The tanyer leaf more broad trails the ground; 

The tall green pine there whistles to the gale. 

And rippling springs meander through the vale. 

Had I like Holmes a sweet commodious farm 
(Not wish for thine no that I deam great harm) 
There would I lead a life of peaceful calm. 
On it a little dwelling snug and warm 
I'd rise before the sun May's sweet morn, 
Where I could rest secure from winter's cold, 
Or screen from Sol when beaming bright and bold; 
Pure limpid springs, whose waters sweet and clear, 
To quaff when southern breezes heat the air; 
There could I rest secure from war's alarms, 
And with the sister arts be filled with charms. 

Halcyonian Isle, lone, silent, blissful shade, 

For soft repose and meditation made; 

The prattling murmurs of the distant rills, 

The wisp'ring zephers sweep the verdant hills 

The foaming cascade rushing to the deep, 

And morning gales glide o'er the landscape sleet; 

Dim gray-eyed shades as evening slowly draws, 

O'er the calm interval industries pause; 

Then pale, chaste Cinthia, stealing o'er the plain, 

Illumes the groves with her bright spangled train. 



L8 Mayor Smyth's Annual Review. 

In such a region I could dwell and think, 

Keel pure delighl and virtuous pleasures drink: 

There unfold my pensive, languid arms 

And wake my lute Lo chanl fair Laura's charms; 

Thee, too, my friend, and second sire. 

Tor thee should burn im grateful, thankful lire. 

There ever blessed, thy aged, generous heart, 

\\ here charity resides devoid of aid ; 

I'm- limit n<>! like I lie rude unfeeling boo)-. 

LVr drove a houseless stranger from thy door; 

You felt my woes, you soothed my youthful grief, 

With hand and heart you ministered relief; 

Long have I listened to thy friendly voice, 

And with thee in thy peaceful house hours rejoice. 

Hut now a different scene attracts my eyes, 

! dwell in pity and in short surprise; 

Now Holmes' isle was lost upon the sight, 

When wo beheld a tedious, sanguine fight; 

Twas just abreast a house that Parker owns. 

Called White House, built of good Burmuda stones; 

A deer being wounded sought the cooling stream, 

But soon was awakened from his short, valiant dream. 

A boat ahead perceived his wa'ry track, 

A slave with ardor strikes it on the back; 

Swiftly he turns, pursues another course. 

'!die wave now foams with his impetuous force; 

The boat men turn and row with ardors ire, 

Their eyeballs flash with eager, thirsty fire; 

Our helmsman cries, away, I'll run it down, 

They cry, no. no. with angry, fretful frown; 

I "or fear we'd own a part concerned in chase, 

And wished alone their swimming foe to face; 

The helmsman yet to run it down strove hard, 

But missed it by two feet or near a yard; ; 

< Mir starboard bow struck with impetuous force 

And for a time had changed the'ir cannoe's course; 

They quickly freed themselves and without harm, 

Drove with the stream again the deer alarmed; 

They soon oertake their prey, and with their oars, 

Such blows they dealt it sounded along the shores; 

Quickly their knives they plunged in purple gore, 

The beast, fatigued and slain, now breathes no more; 

A boat we had dispatched towards the fray, 

With Little Tom, but he could make no way; 

Quick as he jumped down in the boat it drove, 



A Poem by Edward 0. G. Brule in 1804.. 19 

Yet lucky to him quick an oar they hove; • 

Be could not scull, but paddled now with might, 

The stream was against him and he in a fright; 

Our patroon now quickly cried out hard a lee, 

A negro forward let the gib fly free; 

Round flies the vessel on the other tack, 

Cuts through the brine and leaves a frothy track; 

The boat and man we now once more regain. 

Then quick pursue our voyage with might and main; 

Arrive at William's wharf with setting day. 

Then to the village soon we bend our way. 

Sweet village, thou inspired my artless voice, 

When of thy silent bowers I first made choice; 

Where Cainhoy's stream its silver waters roll, 

No shepherd tends his sheep or teemings foal; 

No nymphs and swains there dance upon the green. 

But fell desertion all around is seen; 

The woodman's axe rebound with hollow sound. 

And echo there responds neglected ground; 

Poor Africa's sable sons the team attend, 

The fuel-lart beneath its burden bend; 

A solemn silence reigns around the green, 

And here and there a footstep may be seen. 

A death-like stillness sits throughout the glade,- 

And oaks cast forth a gloomy gray -eyed shade, 

The weeping willow, too, hangs o'er the brook. 

To see its village now by all forsook; 

A barren and neglected spot appair, 

Oft have I stood and dropped a silent tear; 

To see such indolence around prevail, 

Where towering pines sweetly whisper to the gale; 

There Pinks and Cowslips grace the verdant banks, 

And nature gives to Sol her sanguin thanks; 

Soft purling brooks too creep across the mead, 

And kiss the river whom they often wed; 

Six Buildings stand that grace this silent place 

And dignify its banks with rural grace; 

The dwelling first as sailing up the stream 

Is shut now constant to Sol's golden beam; 

The next just as the other clos'd up fast, 

The Door too fasten'd likely so to last; 

The third now open to Sol's cheering beam 

And near the door a Willow hangs all green; 

Oft have I seen the master of this house 

Walk near this tree in converse with his Spouse; 



20 Mayor Smyth's Annual Review. 

Thc\ seem'd to live in lonesome, silent love 
W nil all the fondness of the turtle dove; 
'Twas he thai gave this little Village birth 
\i"l iiv.l to make it rise t,. real worth; 
It flourish'd for a time, it seem'd to bloom, 
Me saw its Zenith and its shod liv'd noon; 
Bui what «.n earth is permanently great, 
He now beholds it in its falling state; 
The fourth a Mansion Mrs. Pinckney owns, 
'Twas there I first did rest my languid bones: 
The fifth the house of Mr. L. Wigfall 
Lays open to the Goats and comers all; 
The Six the property of Miss Gailard, 
Out buildings nume'rous with a spacious yard; 
(To me this Mansion did she freely lend. 
To her my hart felt gratitude I send 
Accepl the loan and thank my unknown friend); 
A weakness did my youthful limbs assail. 
Which caus'd my visit to this silent vale; 
Like a young twig in spring that shoots up fast. 
Unable yet to bear a storm blast; 
A gale assails it quick on every side, 
11 waves its tow'ring head with youthful pride; 
A fierce North-wester bends it like a bow, 
The twig's inclin'd and so the tree must grow; 
Like this young tw r ig I rose to childhood's bloom. 
And in my youth I wither to the tomb; 
Taught as the nerve that brae'd old Israel's thigh 
And crampt so pity'ous to the human eye; 
In vain to Baths, to streams and friction long, 
Was try'd with care with oils for virtues strong, 
'Th Electric spark and shock then next apply M, 
No benefit I found when these were try'd; 
Now at St. Thomas's their dwelt a man, 
To him I went my malady to scan; 
Oft has he walked six miles in April's morn 
And brought me herbs fresh Cull'd from his own lawn: 
For Oils he saught the Beasts, for weeds the field, 
He try'd his skill to make my muscles yield; 
His Grand Climacteric he with strength had past 
And a full score his frame foretold to last; 
In Braddock's fight he lay'd the Savage low, 
Repeling all that came with youthful blow; 
'Twas there Floyd fought for England and its King, 
Young Washington commanded the left wing; 
Collombia's Star then rose to Gild the way 



A Poem, by Edward 0. G. Bride in ISO J,. 21 

And shine in Glorie on a future day; 

'Twas there he first beheld this Hero young 

And heard true wisdom flowing from his tongue; 

Braddock's neglect there caus'd his life to close, 

And Washington there sav'd him from their foes; 

Then Floyd was young, he fought in youthful bloom, 

And wing'd the bullit from the Rifle's womb; 

There saw his fellow soldiers drenched with blood, 

That search 'd the earth full-deep with purple flood; 

'Twas there Sir Peter fell by Braddock's side 

And many a soldier left a weeping Bride; 

The Gaullic foe there trampl'd o'er the gore 

They from the Sons of Britain tore; 

'Twas youthful Washington with soul of fire 

There check't the shock like Franklin's lectric spire; 

Quick as the flash that rends the sable sky 

Young Washington observ'd with God-like eye; 

To save his men now mark his thoughts were fleet. 

He order'd then a quick and safe retreat; 

The Revolution next this soldier call'd, 

With heart he rose that never was appall'd; 

He fought and bled 'twas for Collumbia's cause, 

And saw her triumph o'er Britania's laws. 

Soon Pease arose and wav'd her Lily Hand, 

And Washington discharg'd him to his land: 

To Till his field next was his dayly care, 

Or chase the Stag and hunt the grisly Bear; 

Keen is his eye to match the quick sight -Lynx, 

And trace the spot to where the Bever drinks; 

To hunt the Partridge hardest of all game, 

To Poise his Rifle shure at every aim; 

Fleet is his step as roe-buck o'er the plain, 

And 'en the pole -cay hed pursue and gain. 

Next to the Land where roves the Indian wide 

He bent his steps and long did there abide; 

There oft he brav'd the tempest howling round, 

As barefoot wading through the deep snow ground; 

Twelve years he dwelt among the Savage tribes 

And saw them take both French and English bribes; 

He found within them dwelt a Lions heart, 

The Foxes cunning and the Serpents Dart. 

From them he learn't their skill in simple weeds, 

To cure Disease and worst wound that bleeds; 

The Cancer's strong corodeing power he'd stop, 

And from his cell he'd make the hard orb drop; 

When languor fell invades the human frame, 



.... 



Mayor Smyth's Animal Review. 

Or fleet Consumtion it- most common name; 
He'd cheer the spirits of his patienl dull 
With weeds and root this fellow quick annul; 
The swolen Dropsy he as sate would cure 

\ud drive Disorders from fair He'be's door; 

1 To me he acted full an a rixious pari . 

Long did he try his skill with friendly hearts, 

Alas my Limbs l.ut baffl'd all his art ) ; 

This Man with ardour search the spacious field, 

Bui all in vain for fate my Doom had seal'd; 

Vain Oh full Vain the skill of all mankind. 

For to the Book of fate we all are blind: 

Nipt in the hud before it 'ear could bloom. 

I sink in silence to an early Tomb. 

In infancy my thoughts were quick and cleair. 

Xo noise or discord cou'd my spirits bear; 

Instructions to receive from my good Sire, 

As resting on his knee by winters fire; 

Ofl L've inhail'd the accents from his tongue 

Sow virtue bound his heart when he was young; 

lie shun'd all idle sports that led away 

And left us in th' bow'rs of vice a prey; 

Mow to a Father's and a Mother's voice 

He long in silence listen'd and rejoice; 

How he grew to manhoods healthy state 

By shunning evil that on youth doth wait; 

My Sire a Man whose every wish and care 

Is to maintain a character that fair; 

To vice and disapation he'l meer yield 

l.ut guards himself with nature's golden shield; 

A heart with pure rnorallity possest 

With reason allso is he heav'nly bless't; 

Probity in triumph reign's o'er his brain 

For he dispise's all the cairs of gain; 

Tie feels the woes of ev'ry troubled breast, 

And oft with hand and heart ministers them rest: 

Cleair as the dew drop resting on the thorn 

That gilds the verdant mead on April's morn; 

Tight as the breeze that skims the grassy plain, 

Bright as the Orb that Gilds the glassy main; 

In ()ld-age vigorous healthy void of care, 

A blooming visage with an eye that's clair; 

Brisk in his gait and lively with his tongue, 

Oft warbling to his Lute a modest song; 

In Sacred strains I've heard him sing sublime, 

The hand that form'd us surely is Divine; 



A Poem by Edward 0. G. Brale in 1S0/+. 

Twas three months T was absent from my Sire 
And often long to hear him touch his Lyre; 
Adiew lie said my Son before e'r long 
May you return to me both straight and strong; 
But He who rules thro' endless pace on high 
Permited not this change Ave know not why; 
Some wiser purpose his decrees to fill 
T rest contented Lord to thy great will; 
My only wish, my only earthly pain 
Was as I rose in youth more strength to gain; 
And as my Sire declin'd in Vale of years 
T might relieve him of all earthly cares. 
The winter I had pass'd in this lone Vale 
Tmprov'd by Stud'y shut from Boreal Gale; 
The month was May 'twas time now to return 
And leave a spot where summer fevers burn ; 
My book and pencil there my chief Delight, 
My Flute to brath oft too in silent Night; 
Or on a Winters Day when bright and clair 
I'd visit my Old Friend that liv'd quite near; 

A purling stream that glided o'er the Mead 

Parted my Villa from his friendly Shed; 

Fifty-five Summers — and bleak Winters too 

Past o'er his head since first this spot he knew; 

He'd seen this parish settle'd seen it bloom, 

Seen all its settlers find an earthly tomb; 

He now alone of all the first remain'd 

And all his sensess in old age retain'd; 

Now four-score winters his brows silver'd o'er. 

His steady temper seemed to insure few more; 

The land of Scotia gave Old Worthy birth, 

But Cain-hoy's parish long have known his worth; 

This Son of Aesculapius bright and fair, 

His neighbour's wounds would heal with heart felt care 

To ride around his parish all his care 

To see the sick and prattle with the Fair; 

For he would say I know I once was young, 

I Love to listen to a Youthful tongue; 

As you grow old be wise but not severe, 

Shun not to mix with youth in decent cheer; 

Yet my Old Friend had felt affliction dire, 

A Son he lost by Lightning's Volant fire; 

A youth just nineteen, bright as Orient bloom, 

A schorch'd up sable corpes sunk to the tomb; 

'Twas when Columbia for her fredom fought 

An op'site cause this youth with ardour saguht; 



-I Mat/or Smyth's Annual Rcclac 



Britain lie thought was rong'd of her jusl right, 
An. I strove to serve her with his utmost might; 
He left a Father's Mansion for a Camp, 
Where Sun beams seorch'd and night-Dews fell all Da 
He left a Mother's for proud glotie's arms, 
A quid Couch for one where Drums alarms; 
Uas poor youth an early grave you found, 
Disturb'd no mere with wars proud pom'ous sound; 
So still so quiet now thy mansion be, 
Von hear not now- the sighing Willow- tree: 
Nor Nightly Thunder with sonorous roar, 
Can rouse thee tho' it knocks at Heath own Door, 
lint there shall come a day when thou shall rise 
And sec salvation shine thro-out the skies; 
When the last Trumpet shall sonorous sound 
And thro' all space its Volant tones rebound; 
When forked Lightnings gleam from shore to shore 
And Thunders burst thro' Death's so'rific door; 
The Earth "will rock and to its center quake, 
And Earthly mortals from Deaths sleep awake; 
Oh! may mankind on that great awful day 
Rise all prepar'd to bend to heav'n their way. 

Next died the partner of bis youthful life, 

First of a Son and then a Virtuous Wife; 

A few years past in Solitude old grown 

In mental sorrow and in hope alone; 

Long has he wish'd that peaceful happy day 

lli^ soul to leave this earth and take soar away. 

Where peace and happiness to faith is giv'n 

And join a Son and Wife in Holy Heav'n. 

Xext from Scothis two antient Sisters came. 

A Brother's troubles to sooth with friendships flame; 

A few years past alas and Death quick bore 

These Antient Maidens to his silent shore; 

Full ninety years the eldest sister told, 

The other eighty-five and some months old; 

Worthy in peace continues still to live. 

And daily to his maker thanks doth give; 

Who tempers every gale with mercy's hand . 

That shakes the Oak or reed thro out the land; 

I parted with my friend the time was late, 

For Summer Sun advanc'd with burning heat ; 

Adieu he said when vernal blasts are gone, 

Come Come once more and 1 make my House your own: 

The Wind was fair, the Day was bright and gay, 



A Poem by Edward 0. G. Brale in 1804,. 25 



The time was now upon the close of May; 
Thetetream was rapid HolwelPs Bark did fly 
With white spread Canvas gay to human eye; 
As passing down the river wav'd my hat, 
Old Saunders quick return'd it with his cap; 
His House stands near to Cain hoy Cooling stream 
And he the master of a sprightly mien; 
Full seventy winter's snow his brows adorn 
But time has not yet bent his stately form; 
Firm and erect as forty now he stands 
And wields his two-edged sword with iron hands; 
To hear him tells of wars and battles dire. 
It warms the youthful heart with warlike fire; 
To rise before the sun and plow his field 
In harvest time to gather what it yeild; 
To chase the Deer upon his milk white steed 
And on his flesh invite his friends to feed; 
Draught after Draught of Stingo then he'll take, 
Rubbing his eyes he'll ciy I now am wake; 
His Guest must then look steady and be smart, 
For now he soon begins to act his part; 
Quick will he challeng any on this land, 
To ride, to shoot or jump with Cap in hand; 
At idleness I've often heard him rail, 
(When this with Vice and want a Man assail 
It never fails to drag him to jail); 
By bright ey'd Labour I have shun'd this jade, 
Of working I was never yet afraid; 
Cain-hoy is call'd a poor and hungry soil, 
A slender crop repay their sluggish toil; 
'Tis not the fault of earth but all their own, 
They should have cherish'd nature daily sown, 
For with the plow if they would rout the grass 
And make the Scythe a blade through all this pass, 
With lime or dung-manure the tight-bound soil, 
They soon would be repaid for all their toil. 
Soon would the corn with tostel wave on high, 
A sight thats pleasant to the planters eye; 
Soon will they see the pea's on poles ascend. 
The Bean's the fence with purple flowers blend; 
What ear they plant perfection Avould attain, 
As numerous as the tribe that swims the main; 
And seeds from seeds still giving birth to birth, 
Millions of Millions bursting from the earth; 
Know they own worth O Man assist your soil, 
A Summers Sun with showers will help thy toyl; 



-ft Mcu/or Smyth's Annual Review. 



\<li<\\ lone spot where oft in silent bow'r 
l"\ mark'd the progress of Life's fleeting hour; 
The \ .1 nit y of Earl lily w ishes seen 
Like grass new with'erd which was once so green. 
(The distant day may come when I may view 
In tile's pale glass the happy how'rs anew 
With Worthy that I'v pass'd in friendship true); 
Adieu (>M Friend and take my parting sigh 
To join the tear that glistened in your eye. 
Perhaps when Autumn's sun has spent its heal, 
We may once more in friendly converse meet. 
The Village soon was lost to every eye, 
As down the stream our rapid Bark did fly; 
Saint Michael's steeple open'd to our view. 
To me the sighl was strange and rather new; 
With Oaks and Cyprus all encompass'd round 
Twas four long months since from my sighl was bound, 
And ne'r had heard this Steeple's merry peal 
hi all this time Ring out the Yankey reel. 
Strike up ye Bells and cheer my listining ears. 
Come banish from my heart all sullen cares; 
For now I see the Mansion of my Sire 
And soon shall hear the Music of his Lyre. 
Scare had I spoke when our swift Bark had gain'd 
It- destin'd port and at the Wharf remain'd; 
(1 saw my Father standing on the strand. 
He quickly came and lent his fostering hand 
To help me up in safety on the Land) ; 
Now safely seated in my native home, 
In six months more perhaps I 'gain may roam. 
Charleston, 30th June, 1804.